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Lebanon Valley College. 




ANNVILLE, PA., JANUARY, 1898. 



Whole No. 57. 



EDITOR IX CHIEF. 

n. Clay Deaner, A. M., 

Professor of Latin and Astronomy. 

FACULTY. 
E.BSNJ Bierman, A. M., Ph. D , President. 

Professor of Menial and Moral Science. 
JohsE. Lehman, A. M., 

Proiessor of Mathematics. 
Itnv. .Ino. A. McDekmad, A. M., 

Professor of Greek. 
John A. Shott, Ph. B. P... Ped., 

Professor of Natural Science. 
Mary E. Sleicrter, A. B , 
Professor ot English and Modern Languages. 
Carrie M. Flint, 

Professor of Piano and Voice. 
Alice K. Ginguich, M. A., 

Professor of Harmony. 
Emma A. D itt ma it, Teacher of the Fine Arts. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 
Clionian Society— Miss Maggie Strickler,'94. 
PMtokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society-C. B. Penny-packer, '96. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 
Horace W. Crider, '93. 

8. Kshelman, '94. 
William H. Kreider, '94. 



PUBLISHING AGENT. 
Clay Deaner. 



All communications or items of news 
»houl,i be sent to the Editor in Chief. Sub- 
THpttons should he sent to the Publisb- 
"8 Agent. 

THU COLLEGE FORUM will be sent 
mthlj for one school year on receipt of 
' "V-five cents. Subscriptions received at 
hme. 

« terms of advertising, address the 
fashing Agent. 



For 



Btei ' e " at th e Post Office at Annville, Pa., 
a » second-class mail matter. 



EDITORIAL. 




| Y tue time the Forum will reach 
Readers the first installment of 
. 000 willed the College will be 

mm. 




^Esident Bferman has received 
e /bat Ms mother is critically ill. 
I . quite old, and there is little 
^ of "er recovery. 



^i C M NCERT wil1 be S iven »y the 
% * Apartment of the College 

Krr!^ 11 - h 1>art 1 ° f the pr0 " 
[Li 6 WLl ' eons ist of solos, instrn- 

; ' !1Ju sicand choruses. Part II 



will be a cantata, " The Garden of 
Singing Flowers." It will afford 
the lovers of good music a rare treat. 

The 18th inst. was the coldest 
weather Annville has experienced in 
thirty years. It was 13 degrees 
below zero. The citizens experienced 
great trouble with their water-pipes. 
A few were bursted, while the great 
majority were frozen shut. The 
ground was frozen to the depth of 
three feet. 

Reports have come to us that 
those of our alumni who are taking 
post work in other colleges are mak- 
ing excellent records. The authori- 
ties are delighted with their student- 
like deportment and thoroughness 
in their work. L. V. C. graduates 
have always maintained such a repu- 
tation. 



The death of Rev. I. Baltzell in 
our midst has been keenly felt. The 
teachers and the majority of the stu- 
dents knew him personally. The 
earnestness with which he spoke on 
the day before his death will never 
be forgotten. A very fitting me- 
morial service was held on the Sun- 
day following his death. Addresses 
were made by Rev. Spayd, Prof. 
Deaner, H. H. Kreider, Adam For- 
ney and others. 



It gives us great pleasure to give 
our readers the valedictoiy address 
of President Vickroy, the first Presi- 
dent of Lebanon Valley College. 
It shows the broad basis upon which 
the College was established, and the 
difficulties and sacrifices that were 
made in its establishment. Its pe- 
rusal should cause the Church, after 
twenty-five years of waiting, to place 
the College on that firm financial 
basis which is so necessary for a 
college to be to do the greatest good 
for the Church and humanity. 



The committee appointed by the 
alumni at its last meeting to have a 
grand rally of its members, met in 
Harrisburg about Christmas. After 
thorough^ considering the condi- 
tions necessary to a successful meet- 
ing, it was deemed expedient to first 
ascertain how many could and would 
attend the meeting, and they recom- 
mended that the meeting be held on 
December 8, 1893, in Harrisburg. 
The committee hopes that the matter 
will be given the attention so im- 
portant a measure should have, so 
at the next meeting of the alumni, 
definite action can be taken. 



The opening of the winter term 
was marked by the return of the 
students with unusual promptness, 
the number of belated stragglers be- 
ing very small. This punctuality 
enabled all to take up the work of 
the term without interruption, and 
the first week found all the machin- 
ery of the College from steam plant 
to study working smoothly and har- 
moniously. 

The opening exercises of Wednes- 
day morning, January 4th, were 
conducted by President Bier man. 
After the usual devotional program 
of scriptural reading, singing and 
prayer, the president welcomed the 
return of the students in a brief and 
appropriate address, and expressed 
the hope that while the fall term 
proved to be a successful one the 
present winter term ought exceed it 
in interest and loyalty to dutj'. 

Improvements in the gymnasium, 
in the form of new apparatus, and a 
thorougly renovated hall, so happily 
inaugurated by the Kalozetean Liter- 
ary Society during the fall term are 
about completed, and a new interest 
is rapidly growing in the formation 
of classes of both sexes, separate of 



2 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



course, for exercise and instruction 
in physical development. 

From growing indications it would 
seem as though the time was nigh at 
hand for College authorities to begin 
to consider "how far the benefits 
may be secured from manly exercise 
without the accompanying evils." 
The demoralization now attendant 
upon some of the games is simply 
frightful, and in our opinion an earn- 
est effort should be made to stay the 
evil. In importance physical devel- 
opment is on a par with mental cul- 
ture, but how unfortunate that zeal 
in this line of work is running so 
high in our day that laws are being 
violated and the holy Sabbath dese- 
crated. Should any Christian col- 
lege have ever a seeming alliance 
with such work? 

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS 

DELIVEEED BY 

President T. R. Vickroy, A. M., 

At the Commei cement of Lebanon Valley 
College, Jane 22d, 1871. 



Ladies and Gentlemen : All times 
are not equally important. Spring 
is the season of flowers ; autumn of 
fruits. A pebble may turn a river, 
and a trival circumstance may deter- 
mine the course of empires. A gentle 
rain on the morning of the mem- 
orable 18th of June, 1815, changed 
the current of human history, and 
sent Napolean Bonaparte a fugitive 
from Waterloo to end his days on 
the mid-ocean rocky isle of St. 
Helena. In our own history, a slight 
circumstance may determine our 
life-destiny. As the fall of an apple 
led to the discovery of the laws 
which hold planet to planet and bind 
the everlasting hills in chains of 
adamant, so the gravest consequences 
may result from acts seemingly in- 
significant. 

Life also has its epochs. These 
are moments 

"When the spirit receives 
Whole volumes of thought on its un- 
written leaves ;" 

when our susceptibilities are intensi- 
fied and when impressions which 
cling to us for years are indelibly 
imprinted on our hearts. 

The present is such an occasion. 
The circumstances which surround 
us, and the interest which they nat- 
urally excite, conspire to impress 
everything associated with this 
hour's proceedings. 

To-day I live not in hope but in 
memory. My thoughts wander 
over the past. For more than five 



years I have devoted my life and my 
energies to the interests of this in- 
stitution. From a few primary pu- 
pils, I have seen it grow to collegiate 
proportions. I have seen it when it 
existed only in thought, when it was 
the latest bud hid beneath the bark 
of the trunk, when it was a child sick 
unto death and needed the fostering 
care of a father, when its friends 
were few and disheartened, and its 
enemies were bold and boisterous, 
when some who now are prominent 
were too fearful to sustain it by open 
advocacy, and who, Joseph and Nic- 
odemus-like, would have embalmed 
it and laid it in the tomb. But the 
sentiment is changing, the opposition 
has expended its force, and, like a 
spent arrow, it lies harmless in the 
dust. Anew spirit has been aroused, 
and though I shall not see it, nor 
reap its benefits, the College will long 
enjoy the things for which I have 
toiled and suffered. 

In the desert near Gila Bend, is to 
be seen, plainly and distinctly, the 
face of a man reclining, with his eyes 
closed as though in sleep. The In- 
dians think that it is Montezama's 
face, and that some day he will arouse 
from his slumber, and gather all the 
brave and faithful around him, uplift 
his downtrodden people, and restore 
his kingdom to the gloiy it had be- 
sore the Spaniards came. So strong 
if their faith, that in some places 
fires are kept constantly burning, in 
anticipation of his early coming. 
They have watched and waited long. 
The battle cry has echoed from crag 
to crag as it rolled along the moun- 
tains, the earth has drunk the prec- 
ious blood of patriots, and yet the 
face is motionless and silent. When 
I came here in 1866, the spirit of 
education was sleeping. There was 
not a first-class school between Har- 
risburg and Easton. There was a 
sleeping face eveiy where to be seen, 
but with signs of awakening. Gleams 
of beauty were here and there visible. 

As it slept long and soundly, it is 
awakening with the more energy. 
All along the line colleges are 
springing up, and people who op- 
posed education before are becom- 
ing its most earnest friends. To give 
the blessings of a higher education 
to this section which literally groans 
with abundance, is the task of the 
rising generation. I have given it 
what impulse I could. It remains 
for others to enter into my labors 
and continue the much-needed work 
of reform. 

I live to-day in the past, but it is 
a past full of hope for the future. I 
live in the consciousness of duty 
done, and in the confidence that the 
good seed sown will not be barren 
of results. I have been as "a com- 
plaining brook which makes the 
meadows green," sometimes sad, 



sometimes discouraged, but ever 
hopeful of final triumph. 

1 have looked down the vista J 
the ages, and have seen in fancy wha 
will be transacted here for years to 
come. I have seen class after class 
enter and conquer, and go forth an 
so many bright winged messengers 
to scatter truth and bless the wor 
The acorn is a little thing. It hides 
itself in the earth and stealthily 
sends up its little swollen seedleaves. 
The roots sink into the earth, the 
stem aspires to the clouds, and, under 
the genial influences of sun-light and 
moisture, it becomes the majestic 
tree. Time is an element in i 
growth, and so time must work its 
changes in Lebanon Valley College. 
After God had made his promises to 
Abraham telling him that his seed 
should be as the stars which he could 
not number, and promising him the 
land in which he was then a sojourner, 
the father of the faithful asked for a 
confirmatory sign. The Lord di- 
rected him to prepare his sacrifice, 
to place it in order, to protect it 
from harm, and to stand still, and 
see the salvation of God. Abraham 
obeyed. When the sun was goin.2 
down, a horror of great darkness fell 
upon him. This prefigured the 
bondage in Egypt. But when the 
sun was down, behold a smoking 
furnace and a burning lamp passed 
between those pieces. Tnen tlic 
Lord made a covenant with Abra- 
ham, and gave him in promise tl;e 
land from the river to the sea, from 
the mountains of Lebanon to the 
overflowing Nile. So the way tj> 
success lies through sacrifice,throuP 
the horror of daikness, but at tin 
end the smoking furnace and burnui? 
lamp w ill be the sign that God bl 
covenanted to give us Canaan jf 
sure possession. Abraham's experi- 
ence must be the experience of eac 
individual. I have made my sm 
fice— a sacrifice of toil and sorrow 
the horror of darkness has coraeo^ 
me as discouragement after ^ nsC ° l 
agement has fallen upon this en ^ 
prise — hope deferred has often m* 
my heart sick; but I have seen 
hope the burning light, and tho^ 
if not until I have slept wi»l 
fathers, God will assuredly bless* 
enterprise. Others will have to 
rifice— others will see the dai '» 1 
and shudder— others will feel WW 
have felt, but in their sorro* _ 
them remember that, while J 
mine bore the sorrow alone, thej^ 
feel that they are not tread"^ 
unexplored path. I believe U^j 
races of mankind are joined i' 1 ^ 
sympathy that no one ca £. ot hef 



alone. I shall feel my 



griefs and participate in hi s J°'n| 
triumphs. And so as .V earS . M Jil 
and the College rises above ji^J 
culties,in its success I shal 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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tiallv compensated for my toils and 
sorrows here. 

But I live in the past only as in 
the past I saw the future. A little 
]lier e than five years ago, Lebanon 
Valley College was not. A college 
waS to be established, but it whs 
like making brick without straw. 
Had there been a nucleus of college 
3es with which to begin, the work 
would have been accomplished with 
comparative ease. There was then 
no taste for liberal learning. The 
great work was to create a thirst for 
knowledge. This was no easy mat- 
ter. It has required unceasing toil 
and effort, but the fruit of these 
vears are beginning to ripen. 

No student will be fully benefitted 
by a college training unless the love 
of learning is his animating princi- 
ple. Like virtue, knowledge is its 
own reward, and he who studies for 
a diploma, for honor, or even for 
position, has not even tasted the de- 
light of liberal learning. I have no 
patience with the idea too prevalent 
among many, "If we don't get an 
education we shall have to work." 
Away with such false notions! 
Knowledge cannot be bought with a 
price; neither can it be inherited. 
He who would gain this priceless 
pearl must get it by unremitting 
toil. It is a personal gift, neither 
purchasable nor transmissable. A 
student is one who studies, and the 
college affords him help and guides 
that be may obtain a successful is- 
sue. But what is a college ? Lest 
you misapprehend its nature and ob- 
jects, I shall attempt to describe it. 
The term college does not mean a 
pMing, otherwise wealth might be 
P'tted against brains. The term is 
Use d in a collective sense, and im- 
Pbes an association of persons united 
,0r tbe accomplishment of some 
pat object. Thus the twelve men 
vhom Jesus chose to organize his 
Jjhurcb are called college of Apos- 
es . The term is, however, more 
Ptieularly applied to persons as- 
sociated for the purpose of studying 
, u » science and literature. The" cof- 
i(; Se diffe 



tion s 



-rs from all other institu- 



of 



111 'ts aim, methods and modes 
administration. It is not a 
*™ ln g school, where the pupils are 
I? 8 not >et capable of self-gov- 
la no tUent ' ancl needing the surveil- 
ie n u iVen criminals - Neither is 
the ge an University, in which 
E ns j*uction is given by lectures, 
■teicT 6 tuere are 110 restraints 
Kg °* reci tation room. The 
l"'ofV^ e 18 an assoc 'ation of students, 
era! ? 80rs . aud tutors, intent on lib- 
pr 0v eai *ning and anxious for im- 
tli e n 1 ttl p Ilt " In tlie boarding school 

Kstud or may (lrive the inditfer " 

but in t | nt ^ r cudgels or sour-looks, 
Bfcfrjj c °Hege he must draw him 
n ess and personal magnet ism 



The Bible strikes the Keynote of 
college education, when it says : 
" Mind sharpeneth mind." The main 
reason why Colleges so frequently 
fail, and become mere machines, 
graduating but not educating, is be- 
cause the professors simply keep) 
school — they simply hear recita- 
tions, look sour when a student 
stumbles and make him stumble 
more, and when the bell rings, too 
frequently before, they fancy their 
work accomplished, and, with the 
dignity of princes, retire from all con- 
tact with the rude material they are 
appointed to educate. If youth 
were blocks of marble, such a course 
would be correct. But as they are 
susceptible of inspiration — as they 
are easily influenced and can be 
moulded to the noblest proportions, 
a close personal contact with their 
teachers is an absolute necessity. 
Young people must be counseled, 
not by formal homilies on theoretic 
ethics, or b}^ partial, carping haran- 
gues, but by that living power which 
noble minds have over ingenuous 
youth. 

The genuine professor must love 
the young. He should be to them 
as an elder brother, genial, kind, 
affectionate, sympathizing and in- 
spiring. His presence must be wel- 
comed. He must scatter sunshine 
wherever he goes, and, by his ex- 
ample, show the excellences of cul- 
ture. He must have liberal views, 
and his tastes must be literary and 
aesthetic. Above all he must be gen- 
erous, intelligent, magnetic, other 
wise he will freeze his classes into 
icebergs. Christ has chosen for the 
work of reclaiming the world to God, 
men whose souls are quickened by 
renewing grace, and whose zeal is 
such that it almost eats them up. 
The educator must partake of the 
same spirit. His work must be per- 
formed enthusiastically, not grudg- 
ingly. Such is my ideal professor. 
It is true, however, that our ideals 
are more perfect than the reality, and 
yet all standards are ideal. 

I am too conscious of personal 
imperfections to presume that I have 
been a model. Yet, in my daily 
intercourse with students, I have 
ever tried to lead them out toward 
the true, the beautiful and the good. 
I have labored in all departments of 
the College. With the many classes 
which I have had the privilege to 
instruct, I have generally tried to 
create enthusiasm, not without par- 
tial success. Where I have failed, 
it has been with minds too gross to 
be thrilled by truth, beauty or good- 
ness, or too stupid to appreciate 
earnest efforts. I dwell with pleasure 
on the pleasant hours spent in the 
recitation rooms. We have traveled 
through winding ways by the moun- 
tain side, but the prospect has always 



been delightful. Whether construing 
French or Latin, whether finding the 
value of x or y, whether following 
the comets in their eccentric courses, 
whether groping after nature's laws 
in the realms of Natural History or 
Physics, whether considering the 
faculties of the mind or the laws of 
reasoning, whether studying human 
duty, or threading the realms of 
literature, reading Chaucer, Spencer 
or Shakespeare, I think you will 
bear me witness that our work was 
never dull. The bell would dissolve 
the recitation, but the interest con- 
tinued to increase from day to day 
until you have said: " There is noth- 
ing so delightful.' 1 But these hours 
are now no more. May their fra- 
grance distil as early dew throughout 
the coming years. 

But the important feature of a 
College is its students. For them 
all the toil and expense is under- 
taken. The church contributes its 
funds, and its ministers .and laymen 
give their counsel, and their green- 
backs. Too often students think 
lightly of their priviliges. They fail 
to perceive that the world and the 
church value them not for what they 
are, but for what they may become. 
Their worth is not actual, only po- 
tential. It is a blooming flower, but 
it may fail to mature into pleasant 
fruit. It is a budding branch, which 
the frost may wither. It is a glow- 
worm light, which may go out amid 
a deeper darkness. Hence the 
student is the object for which all 
travail, and sacrifice and labor. The 
important work of education is much 
more than development. A thing is 
developed when its parts are unrolled. 
Education does more than this. It 
quickens the lifeless soul and makes 
it instinct with lofty aspirations. 
It wakens the dormant powers, and 
leads them out after sublime objects. 
It inspires hope, and courage and 
emulation. It puts old wine into 
new bottles, and there is neverthe- 
less an expansion. If education 
only developed, its work would be a 
monstrosity. We would have the 
magnified coxcomb, the inflated ig- 
noramus, the turgid sycophant. It 
would not be the mollusk developed 
into a man, but a man developed 
into a brutal beast. Education is 
not from educere, a leading out, but 
from educare, which means to foster, 
to cherish, to nourish, to warm into 
life. There is a vast difference be- 
tween development and. growth. 
The bud may blow into- the beaute- 
ous flower, but it blows only to 
wither. All living things grow. 
But how do they grow ? The plant 
feeds upon water and carbon, but if 
there were no life power present to 
assimilate the nutriment tfie plant 
would degenerate into a mineral. 
So with the mind. It is a creative, 



i 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



formative power. The true, the 
good and the beautiful are brought 
within its grasp, and are seized by 
this godlike power, and are assimila- 
ted to the soul itself. Development 
is like its father, Dr. Darwin. 
Science stamps it as a lie. With some 
persons, however, there is only a de- 
velopment. They have only one 
idea, which is developed into protean 
forms. We want less development, 
and more culture and genuine 
growth. J 

And now my work is almost done. 
Whatever mistakes 1 may have 
made, I think you will accord to 
me an unswerving purpose to build 
up the College upon a solid founda- 
tion, and to advance the highest in- 
terest of education and religion. In 
organizing the school, I looked to 
the most thorough education. As 
the school has advanced I have made 
adequate provisions to meet its 
wants. To train all the powers of 
body and mind has been my earnest 
aim. In music and art, as in science 
and literature, much has been ac- 
complished. These pictures, which 
are idealizations of nature, are the re- 
sult of years of training. Those 
who spoke last night, and who have 
spoken to you this morning, are not 
students taken from other schools to 
advance the interests of this institu- 
tion, but have been hewn from the 
rough quarry. They have grown in- 
tellectually under our fostering care. 
Those sweet sounds which have 
greeted you at intervals were from 
voices trained here. It is true, I 
have only done a part personally, 
but I have caused it all to be done, 
providing the teachers at a personal 
sacrifice. More would have been ac- 
complished had I not so frequently 
been thwarted. Where I should 
have received counsel, I have re- 
ceived censure; where I should have 
had sympathy, I have been chilled 
with coldness; where my efforts 
should "have elicited a grateful recog- 
nition, I have received opposition 
and obloquy. But my work is now 
completed. It has made its impress 
where the corroding acids of malice 
can never erase it — on the souls of 
the generous-hearted young men and 
young ladies whom I have instructed. 
The ages will roll on, and still im- 
mortal thought shall live. The years 
will pass, and minds quickened into 
intellectual life shall kindle flames 
in other souls. Eternity alone will 
terminate these forces. 

It is true, I have not accomplished 
all that I desired, but the excellence 
of our efiorts is not to be measured 
by success. Many an evil cause 
temporarily succeeds, while great 
and good enterprises fail. But if 
our heart is set on doing a good 
thing, however we may mistake in 
the means, the character will be 



ennobled and the cause of truth pro- 
moted. 

Whatever my work may have 
been it is now done. It is done but 
not dead. My faith is fully ex- 
pressed in Whittier's words : 

'Tis truth that painter, bard and sage, 
Even in earth's cold and changeful clime, 

Plant for their deathless heritage 
The fruits and flowers of time. 

We shape ourselves the joy or fear 
Of which the coming life is made. 

And fill our Future's atmosphere 
With sunshine or with shade. 

The tissue of the Life to he 
We weave with colors all our own, 

And in the field of Destiny 
We reap as we have sown. 

Still shall the soul around it call 
The shadows winch it gathered here, 

And painted on the eternal wall 
The Past shall re-appear. 

Think ye the notes of holy song 
On Milton's tuneful ear have died? 

Think ye th it Raphael's angel throng 
Has vanished from his side ? 

Oh, no ! We live our life again ; 

Or warmly touched or coldly dim, 
The pictures of the past remain, 

Man's works shall follow him ! 

The false shall die : The name of 
the wicked shall not. Error and 
envy and ignorance shall perish. 
Only the true, the beautiful and the 
good have immortalit}^. One of the 
truest, kindest and manliest charac- 
ters in history draws this parallel 
between the true and the false : 

" Look how the lark soars upward and is gone 
Turning a spirit as he nears the sky ! 

His voice is heard, hut body there is none 
To fix the vague excursions of the eye. 

So poet's songs are with us though they die 
Obscured and hid by death's oblivious 
shroud. 

And earth inherits the rich melody, 
Like raining music from the morning cloud. 

Yet, few there be who pipe so sweet and loud, 
Their voices reach us through the lapse of 
space. 

The noisy day is deafened by a crowd 
Of undistinguished birds, a twittering race 

But only lark and nightingale forlorn 
Pill up the silences of night and morn." 

If we would fill up the silence of 
earth's night and morn, we must be 
true men. We must be useful and 
self-sacrificing ; we must fix our eye 
upon lofty objects, and perseveringly 
seek their attainment. We must 
never relax our efforts. There comes 
an hour in man's history when earth 
loses all its charms, when he stands 
alone with God. In such hour the 
recollection of duty well performed, 
of blessings conferred upon others, 
will be our greatest joy. Neither 
ambition nor selfishness can satisfy 
the mind in life's extremities. A 
great man said to his pupil : 

"Cromwell, I charge thee, fling away am- 
bition ! 

By that sin fell the angels ; how can man then, 
The image of his maker, hope to win by it ? 
Love thyself last ; cherish those hearts that 
hate thee ; 

Corruption wins not more than honesty, 
still in thy right hand carry gentle peace 
To silence envious tongues." 

Like a lark whose music lingers in 
the clouds, like a stream spreading 
fertility all around, like a shower 
brightening and gladdening the earth, 
so may you, one and all, be a fountain 
of constant blessing. 



"Nota Lyric sudden flashing from the 

of the strife ; 
But an Epic swelling giandly onward in tu 

close of life, 
Noble Epic! but the prelude of a nobler an 

to come, 

That shall peal when all the nations ofth 
universe are dumb." 

FAREWELL ! 

Soon this little band will be scat 
tered never to reassemble here a^ain 
The old must die that the new may 
live. Farewell ! It gives me pJ 
to say that sad sweet word. I would 
speak it softly, gently, sweetly as a 
mother smiles upon her child, fer. 
vently as a holy prayer breathed 
when the raptured soul is all alone 
with God. Farewell ! May the 
flowers I have planted bloom with 
increasing fragrance, may the birds 
find peaceful homes in the trees I 
have placed in the Campus, and 
mingle their matins with 

The spicy breath of incense-breath- 
ing morn. 

Friends, Associates, Students, my 
cares, my toils, I bid you all pare- 
well ! 



How To Spend Spare Moments. 

To all classes and conditions of 
mankind, no matter what their avo- 
cation in life, or how pressing their 
business engagements may be, there 
come intervals of time when they 
are not occupied with their daily oc- 
cupations, and when there is nothing 
which requires their special attention 
for some length of time. These 
"spare minutes" vary greatly » 
length as well as in number, anion? 
men engaged in different pursuits. 
Certain classes of men, as farmers, 
clerks, mechanics and the major! 
of unskilled laborers, usually »»* 
busily engaged from eight to twelve 
hours per day, and have daily about 
three to four hours to be spent' 1 
idleness, pleasure or improvement' 
according to the inclination of tit' 
individual to whom the^e oppor 
ties present themselves. Merchant* 
railroad employees and busui 
men generally do not have le' s ^ 
time occur to them at such reg" 1 * 
intervals, and consequently they* 
at a greater disadvantage in t" eff ^ 
of profitably employing their sp :1 
moments. But even those who | 
so situated can achieve much m 
respect if such is their ambitio' 1, , 
The question which confront?! 
of us is, " how can we improve tu^ 
moments of leisure to the best J 
vantage ? " Naturally, no doiiM, 
majority of mankind i 1 ^ avers* 
labor. „ 
If every one had the privily J 
spending life as he saw fit, if 
believe that he exists for a P ur Lj 
and that he has a duty to P e J 
his first and greatest effort ^ 
likely be put forth for the p uI jj 
of providing for himself a ^?f J 



liiS 

mea is of pleasure, whatever m> 



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H 0rs 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



i 

di 
r 

• 



f that term might be. True, many 
persons find pleasure even in 
the performance of some of their 
most difficult tasks ; but this is 
largely so because a rich reward is 
always sure to follow honest and 
persistent effort in any calling in 
jife. Since man's time in this world 
is given him that he may make ad- 
vancement and improvement in him- 
self as well as in his surroundings, 
it should be his desire not to waste 
it in idleness, but to devote it to the 
accomplishment of some useful pur- 
pose. 

While pleasure and recreation 
must not be forgotten, yet work it- 
self can be so arranged that it may 
prove to be ample recreation. 

The man who is engaged in labor 
requiring great physical exertion, 
however small his opportunity for 
improvement, cannot better employ 
the leisure time alloted to him than 
by exercising his mind while he rests 
his weary body. A course of read- 
ing, varied as much as possible, 
could not fail to prove a pleasant 
and delightful means of recreation 
to the muscle-worker who would ac- 
custom himself to such a discipline. 
A considerable knowledge of history, 
science, current news and writings 
of all kinds can be acquired by him 
who does not waste the opportuni- 
ties which his spare moments afford 
him. 

A surprising degree of culture and 
knowledge of the affairs of the world 
can thus be acquired by the man 
who has never had the advantage of 
a college education. 

True, there can be no substitute 
«>r a college training which will pro- 
duce results equally good ; but those 
deprived of this privilege should use 
their next best means of developing 
the powers given them. 

Those engaged in mental pursuits 
Can equally well improve their spare 
moments by employi ng them in a 
* av as different as possible from 
'at in which they are usually en- 
» a gecl. Mental workers engaged in 
^ e active duties of life usually find 
eans of exercising themselves phy- 
Ca % to a sufficient degree in the 
Jtornmnce of necessary duties de- 



Th 



ln g upon them. 



open 1^4.1 w^dnj 

^ to tne student, and consequently 
tint USt receive from a gymnasium 
E**Wch he might under different 



receive from some 



^stances . 
Reemployment, 
fllipti enev er possible, exercise, 
be of mental or physical, should 
m 0m a useful character, and thus the 

*Oulr| nt y* allolte( l for tllis purpose 
vanf„ be employed to double ad- 

""taan 4.1. . • . 

8 ar\- ' ut ot » lvin g man neces- 
U8 e { u] recreat ion, and that of some 
kbora °f )jeCt accomplished. The 
of many persons are such as 



to tax severely their powers in one 
direction only. Such persons attain 
a great degree of strength and de- 
velopment in this one respect, but 
with perhaps some sacrifice in other 
respects. 

This disadvantage, arising from 
the nature of some occupations, can 
to a great extent, be overcome, by 
engaging in something, perhaps of 
a similar nature, but which requires 
some exertion, on the part of the 
other members, of mind and body. 

Some interesting work of fiction 
might prove real interesting and re- 
freshing to one who had for some 
time been engaged in the investiga- 
tion of some principle of philosophy, 
or in making a laborious research 
for materials of interest, or in 
managing weighty and important 
business transactions. Efforts put 
forth in different directions tend 
toward equal development and pre- 
serve against one-sidedness. Much 
can thus be clone by a proper use of 
spare moments toward accomplish- 
ing this result, even if our daily oc- 
cupation has a tendency to produce 
one sidedness. Then, how different 
the result of spare moments well 
spent from that of spending them in 
loafing, or in debasing pleasures, 
which frequently ruin the one so 
spending his time and, many of those 
with whom he comes in contact. 

Many a young person, while spend- 
ing his time in idleness, has been 
led into evil paths, perhaps for no 
other reason than that he saw noth- 
ing else to do; while those who have 
always made an effort to find some- 
thing to do have thus acquired 
habits of thrift and industry which 
were instrumental in making their 
lives useful and happy. 

The men who have achieved suc- 
cess in the past were not usually 
men whom fortune seemed to smile 
upon, but men who, starting from 
the humbler walks of life, by per- 
sistent effort and by embracing every 
opportunity presented to them, 
climbed the ladder of fame. 

Such were Franklin, Lincoln, Gar- 
field and a host of others. 

The time for activity and useful- 
ness is short and the career of one 
man may determine the fate of 
many. 

Some men have become useful 
citizens, while others became out- 
casts because of the influence which 
their associates exerted upon them. 

It therefore behooves every one, 
however, humble, to avail himself of 
the opportunities within his reach, 
and thus make his own life happy - 
and prove himself useful to his fellow, 
man, his country and his God. 

0. E. Good, '94. 



Reverence evei-y woman's opinion 
whether it be to you right or wrong. 



The Past Year's Progress. 

It is pleasant to contemplate the 
past when there are many evidences 
of progress and advancement. Since 
Father Time announced the birth of 
'92, Lebanon Valley College and 
our beautiful village have been keep- 
ing pace with each other. The College 
has been beautified and improvements 
of various kinds made. Our chapel 
has been handsomely frescoed and 
painted. Recitation rooms have been 
made more homelike and music rooms 
made very attractive. Four acres 
of ground west of the campus have 
been purchased and possession will 
be given in April. It will be beauti- 
fully laid out; tennis court and ath- 
letic ground will be made. The 
gymnasium is being thoroughly re- 
modeled and beautified. Additional 
appliances are being secured which 
will make the gymnasium first-class 
in every particular. In May a move- 
ment was set on foot by the Philo- 
kosmian Literary Society to build 
themselves a commodious hall. They 
are succeeding well in their subscri p- 
tions. About six thousand dollars 
have been secured. It is hoped they 
can break ground in the spring for 
the building. To show the progres- 
sive spirit and business tact of our 
town, it is but necessary to speak of 
three different enterprises. 

The business of our bank so in- 
creased that it became imperative to 
increase its capital stock to $100,000. 
The business the past year was the 
greatest in its history, and necessi- 
tates a new banking house which 
they hope to erect in the near future. 

To better accommodate the travel- 
ing public, and to be in touch with 
the spirit of our times, the Hotel 
Eagle was remodeled at a cost of 
$25,000, and equipped with all the 
modern conveniences. Its interior 
is in hard wood finish and is hand- 
somely furnished. The accommoda- 
tions are first-class. No better can 
be found outside of our large cities. 

Our electric street cars are the 
admiration of, and a surprise to, the 
general public. They are cozily 
heated and run at intervals of half 
an hour to Lebanon. They carried 
828,691 passengers during the year, 
which is an unusual showing for the 
first year. An annual dividend of 
six per cent, was declared, which 
very few roads have been able to do 
the first .year. 

We invite our friends to come and 
see for themselves what advantages 
Annville gives. A more suitable 
plan for a college could not be found. 
Our people are large open-hearted. 
Their homes are always open to 
receive von and bid you welcome. 



A bird in the hand is worth ten 
dollars — if it's an eagle. 



6 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Ecce, Homo. 

When Diogenes went through the 
city of Athens, in the full light of the 
sun with a lantern in his hand, he 
was in search of a man. Had he 
lived in the close of the Nineteenth 
Century, in the beautiful city of 
York, Pa., and on the evening of 
December 30th, last, visited the pal- 
latial residence of Mr. D. W. Crider, 
the sought for personage (although 
not in accordance with the old 
cynic philosopher's idea) could have 
been found among a merry, happy 
and joyful gathering of 3'oung people 
who had assembled to do honor to 
the twety-first anniversary of Mr. 
Horace W. Crider. The occasion 
was looked forward to as the social 
event of the season by his many 
friends, and their expectations were 
more than realized. 

The home was beautifully illum- 
inated with gas, while the rooms and 
balls were artistically decorated 
with evergreens and festoonings 
which, with the handsome toilet of 
the ladies, produced a most charming 
effect. 

After all the guests had assembled 
in the spacious parlor, Mr. D. W. 
Crider gave an address of welcome, 
followed by several pieces of music. 

Games of various kinds were in- 
dulged in until a late hour, when re- 
freshments were served, consisting 
of fruits, candies, nuts, cakes and 
cream. Toasts on the subjects of 
" The Ladies," " College Days," and 
"The Present Occasion" was res- 
ponded to by representations of the 
different colleges. The hour of bid- 
ding good-night having come, the 
resident guests returned to their 
homes, accompanied by one or more 
of the visiting. All were delighted 
with their royal entertainment and 
good time. Those present from 
Lebanon Valley College were Misses 
Elvira Stehman, Maggie Strickler, 
Mary M. Shenk, Anna K. Forney, 
Nettie Swartz, Josie Kreider and 
Anna Brightbill, and Messrs. D. S. 
Eshleman, D. A. Kreider, David 
Kreider, C. B. Pennypacker, Chas. 
H. Sleichter, S. P. Bacastoe, and 
W. H. Kreider. K. 

Rev. Isaiah Baltzell. 

On Monday morning, January 16, 
A. D., 1893, at Rev. Henry Spayd's 
residence, Annville, United Breth- 
ren parsonage, after one hour's ill- 
ness (from about C> to 7 o'clock), 
this esteemed divine, in his 61st 
year, passed gently to the home of 
the blest. As poet, musician and 
minister he was widely known and 
greatly beloved. There are very few 
who filled a greater number of va- 
rious important positions in the 
United Brethren Church during the 
past thirty years. By nature, edu- 



cation and grace he was richly en- 
dowed, and his attainments made 
him an amiable friend, successful 
author, eloquent preacher and broad- 
guaged Christian. He preached 
twice the Sunday preceding his 
death, in the Annville U. B. church, 
with unusual inspiration and enthu- 
siasm. In the forenoon his text was, 
" Let thy garments be always white ;" 
in the evening, " And it is appointed 
unto men once to die, but after this 
the judgment." He died at his post 
covered with glory, earthly and di- 
vine. " And he walked with God, 
and he was not ; for God took him." 
We quote one of his own poems 
(songs), founded upon "Blessed is 
that servant, whom his Lord, when 
he cometh, shall find him so doing," 
— as he did : 



" Blessed are the faithful, watching for the 

Lord- 
Looking for the coming of the great reward ; 
When lie comes in glory shouts of praise shall 

ring, 

As the faithful gather with their glorious 
King. 

Blessed are the faithful, watching for the 
day, 

When the earth and heavens swiftly pass 
away ; 

When the lone and weary from their toils 
shall rest ; 

In the Father's Kingdom be forever blest. 

Blessed are the faithful, struggling here be- 
low, 

Watching for the Master while the shadows 
grow ; 

Soon their hearts will gladden at the Master's 
call; 

Come, ye faithful servants, there is room for 
all." — Lebanon Courier. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 



Kalozeteaii Literary Society. 



Palma non sine Pulvere. 



The boys report a fine holiday 
vacation ; gifts, turkeys, candies, 
cakes, etc., are the things spoken of. 
Kind parents, friends and home still 
occupy are minds, but must now be 
laid aside temporarily for more 
Latin, Greek, mathematics, science 
and society work. We did not 
realize all we hoped for in society 
affairs, and I am glad to say it was 
largely due to external circumstances. 
We could not carry out our plans 
in the improvement of the gym- 
nasium, because of the scarcity of 
laboring men to do some of the 
work for us, although what we have 
done is an improvement and a step 
in the right direction. We hope to 
add-to the apparatus. 

There will be a class in dumb- 
bell drills for the ladies, also classes 
in dumb-bells and Indian clubs for 
the gentlemen. 

The sessions held this term were 
interesting; the lastone was especially 
so because of a visit from our 
esteemed instructor, Prof. J. A. 
Shott. The Professor is highly in- 
terested in the work of the societies ; 



the opinions he gave us were app re . 
ciated very much. Come again Pr 
fessor. 

New responsibilities face us this 
term which will be discharged 
earnestly and to the best of our 
ability. 



Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



Our Christmas vacation was a 
short one, but, judging from the 
pleasant faces of our returning mem- 
bers, it must have been greatly en- 
joyed hy all. 

It generally requires a few days 
time, after a vacation, for students 
to become accustomed to study, and 
this proved to be true in our society 
work as well as in our work in the 
class room. 

On the evening of the 6th inst., 
we held the first session of the Win- 
ter Term, and, as no one seemed pre- 
pared to perform the duty assigned 
him on the literary programme, we 
engaged in a "Hash Debate," in 
which some sense was expressed, but 
nonsense greatly preponderated. 

Mr. Shope, a new student of the 
College, visited us on this occasion. 

Messrs. Backastoe, Sleichter, Krei- 
der and Good attended the anniver- 
sary exercises of the Excelsior 
Literary Society of the Palatinate 
College, December 16. 

J. Pv. Wallace spent his vacation 
visiting friends among whom were 
some of the students. 

D. S. Eshleman has not yet re- 
turned to school, being engaged i" 
revival work. 

H. W. Crider recently passed the 
21st milestone on his terrestrial 
journey. 

The event was happily celebrated 
by Mr. Crider and his many friends, 
among whom were quite a nunih er ° 
the students of the College. 

The Money Problem in ourChfltffl 

of 



number 
artic' e 
our 



Dr. Etler, in the last 
the Qvarterly Review, in an 
on the " Money Problem i' 1 
Church," has so' well presented | 
matter of how to relieve education' 
institutions of their present fi |ia 
cial embarrassment that we q u 
therefrom : College agents were ^ 
necessity in the past, and serve 
wise purpose in the beginninO 
our educational work. They vlS ^ 
our people and instructed them 
cerning the great needs ol ■ 
church, and thus disseminated ( e ^ 
to excess) a love for education ' 
denominational schools, 
for such work is now past 
in times when great tilings are 



a 
t 

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tl 
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hi 

it 
ch 
m; 
ar 
sa 
foi 
It 
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foi 
Mi 
po. 

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of 
toi 
La 
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bee 
Sai 
feri 
but 
hea 
mai 
his 
tho 
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Pre} 
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and 

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that 
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education • H 

>>*• % ft Ulat 

past. V Ve tu ai . 

nngs are to 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



done; when men who hold large 
fortunes in their hands need to be 
instructed in the principles and 
duties of their earthty stewardship, 
and direct in the proper distribution 
f their God-given trust. We are in 
jjjjnes when, instead of employing 
salaried agents over the entire pat- 
ronizing membership of a college 
territory, every rich man in the 
church needs a college agent whose 
mission it is to convert him financi- 
ally from the error of his ways, and 
persuade him to make a free will of- 
fering according to the ability God 
hath given him. When an import- 
ant enterprise needs a hundred 
thousand dollars, it is like child's 
play to ask help from a man who 
cannot give more than fifty or a hun- 
dred dollars. In the maintenance of 
the regular ministry and missionary 
cause we need these mites, but in the 
building up and endoWnment of per- 
manent and monumental schools we 
need the mighties. 

The church has millions of dollars 
that are going to waste, yea worse, 
working ruination in many of our 
happy homes and Christian families. 
Our people should be taught that 
it is a disgrace to hoard money for 
children's or riches' sake while so 
many needy institutions of charity 
are crying for our help. It is often 
said that men ought to save money 
for the good of their children. 
It ought often to be said that men 
ought to give with a liberal hand 
for the good of their children. 
Many a man inflicts the greatest 
possible wrong upon his children 
w ''en he makes them the possessors 
of great wealth which they never 
foiled for nor learned to value, 
harge fortunes have too often been 
* curse to children. They have 
^en hindrances rather than helps. 
°&in Jones once compared money to 
fertilizers— a blessing when distri- 
cted, but a public nuisance when 
'eaped up. it is a reproach to a 
Jan's family, as well as a dishonor to 
£» memory, for him to leave them 
thousands while he leaves nothing, or 
least but a few hundreds, of his 

ealth to the cause of God and man. 

onn Wesley, long before his death, 
glared in print: '-If I leave behind 
j.. ten pounds, you and all man- 
j. <■» bear witness* against me that I 

tint i a thief and robber." Admit- 
I a that Wesley's statement is per- 

ti'utl a - 1 exa o" enit ' on °f a great 
touch lfc * S ' nevei *theless not too 

prei ^° Sa ^" ^ Ul ^ no man ' s P vo P er " }' 
t P area to die who leaves millions 

s anf [ ls family and but a few thous- 
I'heV^ a ^ f* onns °f benevolence. 
a nr | t , m ° has come for the pulpit 

^"e press to teach this truth, 
that" ould also teach our people 
tuQ iti ln ^is day of golden oppor 



money it is a disgrace to spend 
thousands of dollars for the erection 
of towering monuments over our 
graves to perpetuate our names when 
we are dead. A far grander way to 
immortalize our names is not to 
place marble shafts over our smolder- 
ing ashes, whose stone will crumble 
beneath the touch of Time's effacing 
fingers, but to build monuments in 
the affection, sympathy, gratitude 
and memory of needy, aching, bleed- 
ing humanity, where the deeds of 
our munificence will be an undecay- 
ing tower speaking of us from genera- 
tion to generation. We want more 
such monuments as were built by 
John Hopkins, Stephen Girard, Cor- 
nelius Vanderbilt, Ezra Cornell, Geo. 
Peabody, Peter Cooper and Matthew 
Yassar. Give us more such " mound 
builders." 



Bivalves For All. 

u r generous-hearted Senior, 
Horace, did a kind act on the 5th 
inst. In honor of his twenty-first 
birthday, the students were given 
an oyster supper, to which all did 
themselves credit and justice. If 
the students could do anything to- 
wards having the words of Horatius 
" serus in coelum redeas" fulfilled, 
they surely would do it. Many good 
wishes were expressed for his future 
happiness and usefulness. It is 
hoped that he may continue to re- 
member that " we live in deeds, not 
years in feelings, not in figures on a 
dial. He should count time by heart 
throbs. He lives most who thinks 
most, feels the noblest and acts the 
best." 



to serve God with our 



The Bonnet Sociable. 

On the morning of the 19th inst. 
at prayers the following announce- 
ment was made : The Faculty and 
students are most cordially invited 
to attend a Bonnet Sociable at the 
Ladies' Hall on Saturday evening 
next. 

It was a novel sight to behold 
how each one smiled and laughed at 
the thought that bonnets were to 
have a sociable. It seemed a little 
out of the order of things, yet seeing 
that bonnets and hats were made 
with a watch in them — a most sug- 
gestive idea — a Bonnet Sociable did 
not seem unreasonable. Did it mean 
that the ladies were to wear their 
bonnets, or were the gentlemen to 
wear them? The inevitable was to 
surmise and wonder and wait. 

Saturday evening found all arrayed 
in their best. Tramp, tramp, the 
boys are marching to the Ladies' 
Hall. Soon the parlor was the scene 
of mirth and joy and not a bonnet 
to be seen. The music-room joining 
the parlor was opened and the 



gentlemen requested to walk in. A 
sight greeted them that only a lady 
could describe, a millinery depart- 
ment with an accumulation of hats, 
bonnets, plumes, ribbons, etc., from 
time immemorial. Each gentlemen 
had to select a bonnet from this hete- 
rogeneous collection that would suit 
the lady assigned to him, and then 
trim it in the most modern style. A 
fixed time was allotted in which it 
was to be done. Needles and thread 
were provided, but no thimbles. It 
was a sorrowful time for the white 
delicate fingers of the gentlemen, but 
bravely and manly the}' faced the 
danger without a murmur or com- 
plaint. A more painstaking, submis- 
sive crowd of toilers the fair ones 
never beheld. To the credit of the 
gentlemen, all were through before 
the time was up. 

The work was so skillfully done 
that the committee appointed to sit 
in judgment and to decide who 
should receive the prize for the best 
taste displayed, had frequent con- 
sultations before the awards were 
made. 

The first prize was awarded to 
Mr. George Stein, who received a 
beautiful calendar and blotter com- 
bined. The booby prize was a rattle, 
awarded Mr. William Gable. 

During the remainder of the even- 
ing games were indulged in, which 
were more than usually enjoyed. 
Cocoa and cakes were served by the 
lady teachers. The evening was 
highly enjoyed by all. Many thanks, 
ladies, for the pleasure and fun. 

One of the Boys. 



PERSONALS. 



Mrs. Laura Middle ton, of Harris- 
burg, was the guest of Mrs. Deaner 
on the 10th and 11th inst. 

Miss Anna E. Wilson was called 
home by the critical illness of her 
grandmother. 

A very pleasant visit was made by 
Mrs. Sleichter, of Scotland, Pa., with 
her daughter, the Professor of Lit- 
erature in the College, and her son, 
Charles, on the 3d inst. 

H. E. Steinmetz, of Clay, Pa., al- 
ways renews his subscription to the 
College Forum with some kind 
words of cheer, which make the 
editor feel like returning a good 
handshake. 

Mr. Urich Deibler, of Baltimore, 
Md., paid the College a pleasant visit 
during the holidays. Mr. Deibler 
was a student in '74. He was de- 
lighted with our improvements, and 
said he never saw the College look so 
well. He is now traveling for the 
Standard Oil Company. 

Mr. John Young, while attending 
the reunion of his father's family, 
Rev. Joseph Young, visited the Col- 
lege. 



8 



THE COLLEGE EORUM. 



Mr. Sheridan Garman at our re- 
cent quarterly meeting was licensed 
to preach. 

Professor and Mrs. Bowman, and 
their daughter Eva, spent nearly a 
week during the holidays visiting 
friends. 

Revs. Enek and ShaefFer before 
returning to the Seminar}* 1 called at 
the College. 

President Bierman was elected a 
member of the Pennsylvania German 
Society at the last meeting. 

Miss Ella Mayer, former teacher 
of Harmony, on the 10th inst. made 
a short but pleasant visit. 



The Origin of Bangs. 

The bang is one of the latest inno- 
vations among women and girls. It 
had its origin in the reformatory for 
girls in Blackwell's Island, New 
York. The inmates were in the habit 
of getting away, and it was difficult 
to recognize them after changina' 
their apparel. It was first suggested 
to crop them, but this was considered 
too sweeping. The bang was then 
adopted, and it was then a perfect 
mark. For some reason or other 
the style struck the popular fancy, 
and in the course of a few years after 
its adoption as a mark in the reform- 
atory it became one of the fads 
of fashion. 



A Big Volcano in the San. 



Four Tiillion Square Miles Covered by the 
Vapor from the Cra er. 



Correspondence of the Globe-Democrat, 

A volcano, puffing great volumes 
of vapor, burst in the immediate 
neighborhood of an active group of 
spots nearly at the edge of the sun. 
For almost two hours the men with 
long telescopes were unable to see 
the black blotches of shadow. This 
volcano was of enormous size, and 
the vapors which it threw out cov- 
ered an area of 4,000,000,000 square 
miles, according to measurement. 

Perhaps the story of the volcano 
is best told by Prof. Hale, of the 
Kenwood Observatory in Chicago. 
Prof. Hale took the only photo- 
graphs made anywhere of the phe- 
nomenon with his recently invented 
spectro-hellograph. Nothing of like 
character has ever been recorded. 
The photographs taken were made 
part of an important record. 

"The particular disturbances which 
occurred in these spots that Friday," 
said Prof. Hale, " was shown by the 
the spectro-hellograph. The " first 
was taken at 11:01 a. m., and shows 
the spots in a normal condition, al- 
most off the edge of the sun, and 
only two of the most important 
showing at all. The next was taken 
at 11:13 o'clock, and at this time 



there had appeared a great hook- 
shaped streamer, which hid from 
view the lower black spot of the two. 
The photographs were not being de- 
veloped rapidly, as the pictures 
were being taken in the ordinary 
record of the day, and we knew 
nothing of the disturbance until it 
was practically over. So it happened 
that No. 3 was not taken for twenty- 
seven minutes afterward, at 11:40 
o'clock. By this time the entire 
spot was hidden from view, and the 
mass that floated over it was brilliant 
in the extreme. It covered, accord- 
ing to our measurement, fully 4,000,- 
000,000 of square miles in area. An 
hour later the eruption had settled 
down, the vapors had passed away 
and the group of spots looked as it 
did before the eruption took place. 

" We were convinced by the dis- 
appearance and reappearance of the 
spot group that the matter we saw 
was above the surface of the sun, 
though the volcano was probably 
hidden pretty snugly under the edge 
of the northern spot. The result 
should have been felt all over the 
world at the same time, but so far as 
we have been able to learn the first 
molestation of the local elements 
was on the next day, when the great 
electrical storm occurred, followed 
by one of the most brilliant auroras 
that was ever witnessed in this lati- 
tude. 

"An exactly parallel case has 
never been recorded, though a some- 
what similar one was noted by Car- 
rington, September 1, 1859. He 
was watching a sun spot when he 
saw two brilliant objects shaped like 
half moons move from one side of 
the group to the other. These were 
comparatively small, for the area 
covered was only about 30,000 square 
miles. Again, in 1891, Trouvelot 
saw an outbreak near the edge of 
the sun from his observatory near 
Paris. Nothing was obscured, how- 
ever, and the extent of the eruption 
was only conjecture. 

" In the phenomenon just noted 
we were able to tell not only its mag- 
nitude, but what the matter was 
made of. It was mostly calcium 
vapor and hydrogen gas. Vapors 
of magnesium, sodium and probably 
iron were mingled more or less with 
the erupted mass that floated away 
across the spots. At the time we 
were looking down into the crater on 
the sun, much as we might look into 
Vesuvius in active operation were 
we to take a balloon and float above 
the volcano. The difference, of 
course, being that instead of seeing 
gases we would look at red-hot liquid 
and ashes that later would settle 
back to the surface of the earth in 
lava and dust. So in the sun the 
vapor settled down and we were per- 
mitted to see the spots again." 



QUMKEKLAND VALLEY/ RAILROAD 
TIME TABLE— Dec. 18, 1892. 

Down Trains! 9/bg I Ky'e I Mr'g DajME^T^ 
Acc. I Exp Mail Exp Mail 

No.12 No. 2 No. 4 No. 6 Nc~8 No~M 



p .M. 

5 00 
710 

10 05 
1028 
10« 
1107 
1127 
1145 
1204 

1220 
A.M. 
4 25 
710 

6 20 
AM. 



Lv. Winchester 
" Martin b'g 
" Hagersto'n 
" Greencas'e 
" Ctiamb'g.... 
" Shippens'g 
" Nevvvi le ... 

" Carlisle 

" Mechau'bg 

Ar. Dillsburg... 
" Harrisbu'g 



Philad'a.... 
New York. 
Baltimore . 



6 15 
6 35 
6 55 



A. M. 

6 20 

7 03 

7 42 

8 00 
8 30 

8 52 

9 12 
i.35 



8 25 
!t 02 



125 

4 00 

I 1 25 

A. M. I P. M. 



9 51 
io'25' 



1 25 
4 00 
1 25 
P. M. 



11 45 

12 09 
12 32 
12 53 

1 10 

1 35 
12 55 

4 43 

2 18 

6 50 
9 35 
6 45 
P. M. 



P. M. 

2 20 
310 
4 mi 

4 2« 

5 06 
5 20 

5 41 

6 07 

6 34 

7 05 
7 15 

10 55 

3 50. 

10 40; 

P. It 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except 
Sunday at 5:55 a. m., 12:30 p. m., 3:45 p. m. stopping at 
all intermediate stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 
6:40 a. m., 1:15 p. m., 4:33 p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and 
Chambersburg. 



Up Trains. 


Win 


•Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


Cog 


N. 0. 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp 




Ni 


. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 


No. 7 


No. 19 


No. 9 




p. 


M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


Lv. Baltimore.. 


11 


30 


4 45 


853 


11 20 


425 


425 


" New York 


8 


00 


12 15 




9 00 


■Jiio 


500 




11 


20 


4 30 




11 40 


435 


7 40 




A. 


M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


" Harrisb'g... 


6 


12 




12 30 


3 45 


8 00 


1025 








7 15 


12 10 




810 




" Mechm'bg 


6 


27 


8 11 


12 51 


4 06 


8 20 


10 41 


" Carlisle 


6 


57 


8 31 


1 15 


4 30 


8 44 


10 58 


" Newvine.... 




21 


8 53 


1 42 


4 55 


9 08 


11 14 


" Shippens'g 
" Chamb'g.... 




40 


9 15 


2 02 


5 16 


9 29 


1138 


8 


03 


<l 40 


2 30 


5 42 


9 50 


1129 


" Greencas'e.. 


8 


24 


10 10 


- 52 


6 08 




1147 


" Hagerst'n... 


8 


55 


10 20 


3 15 


6 30 




1225 


" Martinsb'g 
Ar. Winchester 


9 


40 






7 12 






10 


30 






8 00 






A. 


M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 



Additional trains wil leave Harrisburg dailyexcept 
Sunday at 8:25 a. m., 10:35 a. m.. 5:15 p. m., arriving 
at Carlisle at 9:10 a. m., 11:20 a. m., 6:00 p. m., stop- 
ping at all intermediate stations ; on Saturday addi- 
tional train will leave Harrisburg at 6:20 p. m., arriv- 
ing at Mechanicsburg 6:41 p. m., stopping at allii- 
termediate stations. 

Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hagerstown 
and New York on Keystone Express and Night Ex- 
press east, and on Memphis Express and New Orleaiw 
Express west. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New 
Orleans Express between Philadelphia and New Or 
leans. 



ESTABLISHED 1865. 



Standard and Reliable 
Clothing at Reasona- 
ble Prices. All Our 
Own Make. Spring 
and. Summer Stock 
Now Ready. 



LEINBACH & BRO, 

Cor. 8th and Penn Sts., READING, M 

A SPECIAL DISCOUNT 



TO STUDENTS AND CLERGYMEN 



TF you wish to advertise an ything anywhere m 
1 time, write to GEO. 1'. ROW ELL & Co. 
Spruce Street, New York. 



EVERY one in need if information on the sii»j ^ 
of advertising will do well to obtain a ' '.'fur. 
" Hook for Advertisers. " 368 pages, pri.^ oiit" |g » 
Mailed, postage paid, on receipt of price. < °"|.!2§| 
careful compilation from the American V^!. 
Directory of all the best papers and class jo'" 1 „*) 
gives the circulation rating of everv one, :>n ( ' ,ter>' 
deal of information about rates ami other 'HEjfM 
pertaining to the business of advert ising- ,?323M 
HOWELL'S ADVERTISING ISUREAU, W vv 
Street, New York. 



: 



Em 




Site (Mlcp Jfarwnt 

Lebanon Valley College. 



VOL. VI. No. 2. 



ANNVILLE, PA., FEBRUARY, 1893. 



Whole No. 58. 



EDITORS. 

EDITOR IN CHIEF. 

H Clay Deaner, A. M., 

Professor of Latin and Astronomy. 

FACULTY. 

E. Benj. Bierman, A. M., Ph. D., President. 
Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

John E. Lehman, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. Jno. A. McDermad, A. M., 

Professor of Greek. 

John A. Shott, Ph. B. B., Ped., 

Professor of Natural Science. 
Mary E. Sleichter. A. B., 
Professor of English and Modern Languages. 
Carrie M. Flint, 

Professor of Piano and Voice. 
Alice K. Gingrich, M. A., 

Professor of Harmony. 
Emma A. Dittmar, Teacher of the Fine Arts. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 
Clionian Society— Miss Maggie Strickler, '94. 
Philokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— C. B. Pennypacker, '90. 



ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 
Horace W. Crider, '93. 
D. S. Eshelman, '94. 
William H. Kreider, '94. 



PUBLISHING AGENT. 
H. Clay Deaner. 

All communications or items of news 
Should be sent to the Editor in Chief. Sub- 
scriptions should be sent to the Publish- 
es Agent. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent 
monthly for one school year on receipt of 
twenty-five cents. Subscriptions received at 
a »y time. 

For terms of advertising, address the 
Publishing Agent. 



Entered at the Post Office at Annville, Pa., 
as second-class mail matter. 



EDITORIAL. 



*WS concert to be given by the 
Musical department will be on the 
10th of March, instead of the 1st 
Enounced in our last issue. 



as 



adv 
In 



normal class will be organized 
lln g the spring term. Superior 



stages will be offered teachers. 
° Ur next issue full particulars will 
e given. 



Many have intentions of sending 

child ° hilflren t0 Colle g e > but the 
p ri ren never get to enjoy that 
Alle ge because father forgets that 



lu tentions never do anything. 



fa 



We have frequently been asked 
wiry L. Y. C,. as well as all other 
schools of the church, is not amply 
endowed. Let each member of the 
church and friend of L. V. C. answer. 



President Bierman was honored 
with a special invitation to the for- 
mal opening of the Engineering 
Building of the Pennsjdvania State 
College on the afternoon of the 22nd 
inst. 



Lebanon Valley College asks 
parents to invest a few hundred dol- 
lars in their children's education, 
and promises them that such an in- 
vestmet will pay better than their 
bank stock. 



Dr, Warren, state ornithologist, 
has kindly sent us a copy of the exhib- 
its of birds, beasts and reptiles at the 
World's Fair. There will be a mini- 
ature mountain, with lakes and glens, 
and rills, filled with over 1000 birds, 
deer, porcupines, foxes, squirrels, 
etc., natives of the Commonwealth. 
The exhibit will be very creditable to 
the State, and is the original idea of 
Dr. Warren. 



At about 9:30 on the evening of 
the 19th inst. an extraordinary 
phenomenon occurred here which 
has occasioned unusual interest. It 
was snowing for at least two hours 
and a half, when a bright flash of 
lightning occurred, folio wed by heavy 
thunder. The fall of snow was 
greatly augmented and the storm 
became terrific, while the tempera- 
ture fell rapidly. 



Family prestage alone will not 
carry a man through the world. The 
world asks what, how much and how 
well can you do the work intrusted 
to your care. The man who sa3's 
that becHiise I never had an educa- 
tion my child does not need one, is 



far from wise. He might as well 
say that because the world was con- 
quered with bows and arrows that it 
can be to-day. The man who would 
even think of conquering it in this 
way to-day would be laughed to 
scorn. This age of our present ac- 
tivity, so full of competition, needs 
men who are prepared to cope 
with science and skill. Intellectual 
athletes in all avocations are needed. 



A. Wilford Hall, editor of the 
Microcosm, claims the honor of in- 
venting a new athletic game which 
he calls " Foot Ball Billards." It is 
to take the place of foot ball, base 
ball and cricket, and is designed to 
embrace all the good qualities of 
these three field sports with none of 
the rough and dangerous effects of 
foot-ball playing. It will be supe- 
rior to any of the old games from a 
scientific standpoint, while it will 
be as health-promoting without the 
slightest danger of physical injury. 
To encourage this health-promoting 
and totally harmless game among 
college students, the editor of the 
Microcosm will give $100 as a cash 
prize to be contested for b} r the first 
two college clubs who shall organize 
and start the public exhibition of 
the game ; the winning club of two 
of the first three public contests to 
receive the money, while at least one 
of these contests is to be played in 
New York City. 



We are gratified to state to our 
many readers that the Pennsylvania 
Annual Conference recently in ses- 
sion at Harrisburg, held a very 
enthusiastic meeting in the interest 
of Lebanon Valley College. The 
plan proposed to our Board of 
Trustees last June by President 
Bierman, and adopted by it of rais- 
ing $25,000 in one thousand shares 
of $25 each, was endorsed, and after 



10 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



a thorough discussion the Conference 
accepted its pro rata share. 

But their action in the matter did 
not end here. Measures were also 
instituted to secure the money by 
established agencies at an early date. 

One very favorable indication was 
the degree of interest that was taken 
by the lay members of the Conference. 

A resolution was also passed by 
unanimous vote thanking President 
Bierman and his associates for the 
excellent management of affairs dur- 
ing the past two years. 

A. H. Rice, of Chambersburg, Pa., 
and John C. Knipp, of Baltimore, 
Mcl., were elected Trustees of the 
College to serve for three years from 
June next. 



On the 21st of January the execu- 
tor of the Mrs. Mary A Dodge estate, 
N. Rufus Gill, Esq., paid into the 
hands of the treasurer of the College, 
Mr. H. H. Kreider, the sum of $8,- 
443.11, which is the first installment 
of the $10,000. The second install- 
ment may be paid within a year. It 
appears that Mrs. Dodge willed to 
various persons and institutions fully 
all she was worth in money and 
property, and that because of the 
collateral inheritance tax and depre- 
ciation of property there may be a 
pro-rata deduction on all amounts 
named in the will. The executor en- 
tertains the hope that he will be able 
to pay at least ninety-five per cent. 
Measures are now on foot by the 
College authorities to invest the 
amount named at legal interest. 



Prometheus Bound. 



BY PROF. J. A. M'DERMAD, A. M 



The tendency of the Greek mind 
was toward the representation of 
the heroic. Their limitless ardor in 
its airy flights, sought to convey 
men into the regions of the infinite. 
Their transcendent genius delighted 
in depicting human beings with 
powers and prerogatives approach- 
ing the divine perfection. Life with 
them had both a real and ideal sig- 
nificance, and in the embodiment of 
these two principles their imagina- 
tion embraced the amplest range and 
the fullest measure of its power. 
This is one reason why their litera- 
ture has attained such a large and 
diversified influence. Their creative 
genius occupied itself in the produc- 
tion of beings and worlds of the 
most infinite variet}' and diversified 



order, and although ignorant of the 
true Deit}^ they were not without 
that impulse of enlightened nature 
which seeks amid the works of crea- 
tion and the dictates of reason to ap- 
prehend that Being who is " before 
all things." Thus, while in the realm 
of the imaginary and ideal they at- 
tained high intellectual distinction, 
they also sought to grapple with 
those more substantial problems 
which pertain to the Divine Being, 
the creation of the world, and the 
immortality of the soul. They recog- 
nized the fact that man is far above 
the other orders of creation, and that 
he has faculties and endownments 
allying him to higher being and a 
higher sphere of existence than the 
material creation. They sought to 
represent man's relation and allegi- 
ance to a divine Being, by means of 
various and diversified forms of 
sacrifice and service. Borrowing 
largely from the East, they gave a 
new aspect to the religion which they 
accepted, by the much more vivid 
and sprightly spirit which the} T 
breathed into the old mythology. 
They placed religion on a much more 
intellectual and enlightened basis 
than any other heathen nation before 
them had done. So diversified was 
their worship and so multiplied their 
shrines that Paul when he went 
there declared that the}'' were " too 
superstitious" (over religious). 

Yet amid all this poetry and cul- 
ture, they were not able to divest 
themselves of the shackles and rid 
themselves of the environment which 
ignorance and false philosophy had 
cast upon their souls. Their re- 
ligious views in general were not able 
to elevate the soul, or give man fel- 
lowship with the divine, or elevate 
his spiritual character. Yet amid 
this despotism of moral depravity 
and intellectual vassalage, there were 
some minds which seemed to rise 
triumphant over their circumstances, 
and to pierce through the veil which 
surrounded their moral and ethical 
horizon. There were some minds 
so richly endowed by nature and 
the gifts of intellectal genus that 
they penetrated the sordid encroach- 
ments of their religious institu- 
tions and customs, and rose to 
a higher conception and truer 
estimate of truth, rectitude and jus- 
tice. Such were the men who pro- 
duced works which survived their 
age, the light of whose intellect 
seemed inspired from above, and 
whose words seem the echo of di- 
vine revelation. Such was the char- 
acter of the genius of iEschylus. He 
was one of that illustrious trio 
through which the genius of tragic 
poetry attained its highest degree of 
excellence and perfection. In fact we 
may say that these masters of tragic 
song were the models after whom 



all succeeding tragic writers have 
patterned in every nation and a^e. 
Endowed by nature with gifts S f 
rare excellence, he improved them 
by a rigid and comprehensive course 
of study, resulting in that mature 
scholarship which afterwards made 
him famous. Besides his rare men. 
tal acquirements he was possessed 
of strong religious convictions and 
principles, which fact exerted a last- 
ing influence over his character. I n 
this respect we might say that he 
was in advance of his age. His 
transcendent genius and profound 
ethical principles appear, like those 
of Socrates, to have penetrated be- 
yond the nebulous maze in which 
the religious practices and beliefs in 
which the Greek polytheism was en- 
swathed. He cherished truth in its 
might with a clearness of vision and 
boldness of perception which belongs 
to a later age and a more advanced 
theology. His mind seems to have 
grasped some of the greatest and 
sublimest truths of human duty and 
destiny, as if by the power of intui- 
tive perception. The only explana- 
tion of this feature of his genius and 
the only clue to his teachings is that 
he was enlightened by that " Light 
which enlighteneth every man that 
cometh into the world." His con- 
science caught a ray of truth in its 
ultimate grandeur and sublime en- 
durance, and transformed by its ce- 
lestial imagery, his productions bear 
the impress of its ennobling, invinc- 
ible and unchangeable character. 

The " Prometheus Bound" ts one 
the greatest productions of the poets 
mind, and we may say that as a pro- 
duction of tragic art it has few 
equals and no superior in any lan- 
guage. The conception of the author 
in this drama is unique and unprece- 
dented. It represents a conflict 
among the immortal gods. The lead' 
ing factor in the action and that 
which lends supreme interest to toe 
issue is the fact that the occasion o 
the conflict on the part of the hero, 
is not passion, jealousy, revenge 
avarice, but principle. The" Hamlet 
of Shakespear is a tragedy of thoug 
in which the hero finally pei« 



to exec# 
a tragedy 01 



tfbick 



under the weight of a deed whicfi 
has not the courage 

Goethe's " Faust " is a } 

passion in which the hero heco^ 
the victim of the basest and 
malignant passions through 
he is borne onward by one i"^ 
ence after another until he 
tangled in the wild maze of cl ° aD d 
difficulty and crime. By triflin | n j 
dallying with the powers of dark | 
he becomes in time the helpl 639 ^^ 
deluded victim of their infernal 
and rage. In both these tra » re it 
the heroes become involved ^ 
a labyrinth of difficulties from ^ f 
there is no escape. The i' eS 



i 



i 

tl 
f( 
it 
tl 
T 
w 
tl 
a( 
ai 
st 
Pi 

8t 

ve 
on 



8U 

sh 
of 
a 1 
th( 
ed 
be] 
est 
exi 

rhe 
his 
Eu 
th a 
the 
ch\ 
pla 
he! 
hoi, 
s up 
and 

\ 
He 

Po e 
th. e , 

v in ( 
the 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



11 



of 
m 
se 
re 
k 
n. 
ed 
ad 

St- 
ill 

be 
lis 
nd 
>se 
he- 
ich 
i in 
en- 
its 
ind 
ngs 
ced 
ave 
and 
and 
itui- 
ma- 
and 
that 
ight 
that 
con- 
i its 
en- 
s ce- 
bear 
rinc- 

one 
oet's 
pro- 
few 
r lan- 
ithor 
irece- 
nflict 



;o the 
on o f 
hero, 
ge of 
mlet 
ougM 

icli be 
eC r# 



most 
*bi<* 



is c " 

dou bt ; 

rS 

suit ' 



their actions is unforseen and irrevo- 
cable, and having taken the first 
s t e ps in the drama they are borne 
onward to the fatal end by forces 
ove r which tbey have no control. 
The " Prometheus Bound " is a 
tragedy of principle, in which the 
controlling notice is benevolence to 
man. The ennobling effect of the 
tragic action is substantially height- 
ened by the fact that the central 
character who is endowed with fore- 
thought and prescience, clearby sees 
beforehand the consequences of his 
actions and the sufferings and griefs 
that should result. 

The author shows his complete 
mastery of the tragic art by the 
manner in which he arranges the 
actors and their parts in the play ; 
and especially by the use which he 
makes of the agencies and forces of 
nature to intensify the otherwise 
unique and exceptional plot of the 
piece. 

He uses the most rugged and 
terrific forces of nature to aid in the 
fulfilment of the mighty theme. The 
sun, the air, the earthquake, the 
tempest and the thunderbolt all con- 
tribute their influence in carrying 
forward the action and in emphasiz- 
ing the purpose of the author and 
the consummation of the theme. 
The language too, is in harmony 
with the subject, the occasion and 
the thought and character of the 
actors. It is intensely figurative 
and metaphorical, and abound in 
startling allegories and ponderous 
phrases. Mather says of it: "His 
style is bold, striking, often in its 
vehemence and virile vigor verging 
°n the turgid and uncouth, inter- 
spersed too with passages of 
such sweetness and pathos as to 
s bow that he was also a master 
01 lyric song. He was preeminently 
a theological poet who appreciated 
* ne greatness of his mission as an 
educator and elevator of the people, 
tore w hom he discussed the grand- 
and most profound problems of 
«as tence and destiny." His style 
ants the polished refinement and 
"etorical finish which characterized 
Eu - y .°! ln g er rivals Sophocles and 
that , 6S ' Which ^ ave t0 tueir P la . vs 
them ° rical ele g ance whicl1 made 
chvl S ? P°P ular at Athens. ^Es- 
pla\ epeilds for the effect of his 
h e JJ? 0n the mighty theme which 
hohU 2 ? 8 Witl1 invin cible grasp and 
s ut)e,i 0re the mind in a11 the 
M ,!; n u realism of its purpose 
The character of 
is finely portrayed, 
as the great bene- 
i opposition to the 
eus. The 



results. 
Jj^theus 
sta nds forth 



f act 



0r ^ man 



poet • and malignity of Z_.. 
theii s J* . entl y pictures in Prome- 
^incibl itleal ° f a transcendent, in- 
the m a e and magnanimous hero, and 
finer in which this character 



is conceived, drawn and perfected, 
are among the great things of litera- 
ture. They give to the play a vigor, 
mystery and pathos which place it 
among the enduring triumphs of 
literary genius. The play begins 
upon a super-human elevation, which 
seems as though it would be impos- 
sible to be maintained, yet it is done, 
and the intensity of the action is 
kept up to the very close where it 
terminates in such a climax as has 
been the wonder and admiration of 
ages. The hero is throughout the 
central figure of the play, and his 
incomparable philanthropy, his self- 
sacrificing devotion, his unabated 
heroism, and his sublime and invin- 
cible courage, are among the en- 
nobling monuments of literary genius. 
The play opens by two giants, 
Kratos and Bia, who drag Prome- 
theus to a mountain region and by 
the aid of Hephaestus chain him to a 
desolate peak. Hephaestus utters 
many protestations and remon- 
strances against the work committed 
to him, in consequences of which 
Kratos reproaches him, and urges 
him on ; and at the same time utters 
the most violent and abusive invec- 
tive and insolence against the 
prisoner. 

TO BE CONTINUED. 



Romanism in America. 

Among the many evils which to- 
day threaten the peace and prosperity 
of America there is none more to be 
feared than Romanism. " Let us be 
Catholics," said Bossuet, " but let us 
be Gallicans." The Romanist of to- 
day says, let us be Catholics, but let 
us be Amercans ! But is it possible, 
to be at the same time, a loyal Cath- 
olic and a loyal American? We are 
convinced that it is not, and that by 
closer study of the question we will 
all reach that conclusion. 

If the liberties of the American 
people are ever destroyed it will be 
by the hands of the Roman Catholic 
clergy. These were the words of 
Lafayette, who, perhaps, has done 
more for American liberty than any 
other man not an American. At 
the time of their utterance these 
words seemed to be without signifi- 
cance. The Romish churches in 
America were then a few Missionary 
stations, widely scattered through- 
out the land, but in them Lafayette 
saw, as only he could see, the out- 
posts of a mighty Roman army, 
marching from one conquest to an- 
other and aiming at tue very life of 
American liberty. In 1800 the 
Romish Church numbered one 
hundred thousand souls, but now 
she musters an army of nearly seven 
millions. Can we behold this mighty 
array and know its principles with- 
out a sense of danger ahead ? La- 
fayette saw how this serpent of 



Ultramontanism had wound itself 
around the national life of his 
country until it had stifled the liber- 
ties of the people. The close ob- 
server cannot fail to see that it is 
slowly but surely doing so in this 
land, and whether or not it shall 
crush out our liberties will depend 
upon the action of the people. 

However, the majority of the peo- 
ple are inclined to regard this matter 
lightly and smile with contempt 
upon any one who undertakes to dis- 
cuss this matter. Smile on friend, 
but when the conflict comes, remem- 
ber you have not been unwarned. 

Now in order to obtain a clear 
conception of the matter in hand, let 
us compare a few of the fundamental 
principles of our government with 
those of the so-called Holy Catholic 
Church. 

That, perhaps, which above all 
others is dear to us is liberty of con- 
science, or the right to think, believe 
and worship in whatever manner we 
desire. The Constitution of the 
United States guarantees perfect 
liberty in this, but Rome says you 
are not capable of exercising your 
own judgment, you shall think only 
as the Church allows you to do, and 
shall not, under pain of death, follow 
your own inclinations. 

Says a Holy Father: "The ab- 
surd or erroneous doctrines or rav- 
ings in defense of liberty of consci- 
ence is a most pestilential error." 
Another says : " No man has a right 
to choose his religion." Still an- 
other: "Religious liberty will only 
be endured until the opposite can be 
carried into effect without peril to the 
Catholic World." 

We are proud of the right of free 
speech and the privileges of a free 
press. That Rome would stifle the 
former was plainly shown only a few 
weeks ago, when in Cleveland, Ohio, 
an ex-priest attempted to lecture on 
the subject, " Why I left the Romish 
Church." He had scarcely begun 
when a mob forced its wa} r through 
the rear door and attacked the speaker 
on the stage. After a general fight, in 
which a number of shots were fired, 
the mob was finally ejected, after 
which the lecture was continued. 
At the close the lecturer was obliged 
to be escorted to his hotel by a 
strong guard to prevent violence 
upon his person. 

What an outrage upon American 
liberty ! In regard to her attitude 
toward the free press, we learn that 
Pope Pius IX. anathemized all who 
maintain the liberty of the press 
and all advocates of free speech, 
which he calls the " liberty of per- 
dition." Our great political parties 
are constantly vieing with each 
other as to which shall get the most 
Romanist votes, and as a conse- 
quence the press of either is muffled 




12 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



as to the true attitude of Rome. It 
seldom speaks of the old heirarchy, 
except in commendation or praise. 
Thus Rome is magnified in the eyes 
of many who do not know the facts 
of the case. But let our politicians 
cease to bid for the Romanist vote, 
let their press unfold the true nature 
of things, and Rome's sun will at 
once begin to set. 

The hope of America is in the free 
education of her children, and for 
this purpose she has instituted the 
free school system to which all point 
with pride. But what is the attitude 
of Rome towards this? Is it not 
one of bitter hostility ? Were it in 
her power to-day she would blot our 
schools out of existence and substi- 
tute, if there would be a substitution 
at all, her parochial schools which 
are good for nothing but to fill the 
mind with superstition and idolatry. 

Says the Cincinnati Telegraph : 
" It will be a glorious day for the 
Catholics in this country when under 
the blows of justice and morality 
our school system will be shivered 
to pieces. " We do not forget the 
fact that during the dark ages it was 
Rome who kept the light of educa- 
tion from being utterly stamped out 
or that the Jesuits were at one time 
the most famous teachers of Europe. 
In spite of all this, however, Rome 
never has nor does she yet favor the 
education of the masses. She now 
as ever holds to the motto, " Ignor- 
ance is the Mother of Devotion." 
To be true she is building schools 
and colleges all over the land, but 
only because she is compelled to do 
so in order to keep the respect of 
the people. Her real attitude towards 
the masses must be judged by her 
policy in countries where she has 
had or still has undisputed sway. 
In those countries the people are in 
besotted ignorance. For instance, 
in her own Italy, which according 
to Rome's pretentions ought to be 
the most highly enlightened country 
in the world, we find 13 per cent, of 
her population illiterate. 

In Spain we find 80 per cent, and 
in Mexico 90 per cent, who cannot 
read or write. Consequently what 
is the moral condition of those coun- 
ties. They find their chief delight 
in bull-fights and other sports from 
which he who has any traces of feel- 
ing must shrink with horror. 

The Constitution of the United 
States requires obedience to the laws 
of the land and loyalty to the gov- 
ernment. The Pope also demands 
obedience and loyalty to himself. 
Hear a few of his utterances. " The 
Romish Church has a right to exer- 
cise its authority without any limits 
set to it by the civil power." " The 
Pope and the priests ought to have 
dominion over the temporal affairs." 
In the oath of allegiance taken by 



all who are raised to positions of 
trust each candidate swears that he 
will endeavor to preserve, defend, 
increase, and advance the authority 
of the Pope. Bishop Gilmour says : 
" Nationalities must be subordinate 
to religion, and we must learn that 
we are Catholics first and citizens 
next. 

But, is not Rome a benefactor on 
account of her control of the vicious 
classes ? That she has a wonderful 
control over them is true ; but wlrs ? 
Are not the vast majority of loafers, 
bums, thieves and thugs members of 
her fiock? The police records of 
New York and other large cities 
record that at least 15 per cent, of 
the criminals are of Roman Catholic 
origin. Do we then need to wonder 
at her power in that direction ? But 
is this not in itself an indication of 
danger? Might not this great influ- 
ence be used against American lib- 
erty ? We do not doubt that the 
majority of priests are or think they 
are loyal American citizens. But 
the}* - are members of a system in 
which free agency is impossible. 
They belong to a vast army in which 
the strictest discipline prevails and 
the most prompt obedience is en- 
forced. The commander of this 
system is a Roman who cares noth- 
ing for American liberty. His am- 
bition always has been and ever will 
be universal conquest. In taking 
command of the Church he takes 
this oath : The Vatican claims ab- 
solute authority in all matters 
temporal as well as spiritual, and 
every priest, bishop and cardinal 
throughout the world takes an oath 
of perfect submission to the Pope 
as supreme lord and master of all 
things. Such being the case, will 
not the priest, whatever his feelings 
as an American citizen may be, sup- 
port the Pope in whatever he com- 
mands him? Hence we are led to 
believe that whenever Romanism 
shall have sufficient strength the 
order — forward march — will come 
from across the sea, and these priests, 
whose superstition has taught them 
that disobedience to the Pope means 
eternal punishment, will march at 
the head of their blood thirsty le- 
gions, nor will there be a halt until 
every enemy has yielded up his life's 
blood. 

But in spite of her principles of 
universal conquest and attitude to- 
wards our institutions, many people 
are constantly saying : " is not Rome 
becoming more Americanized? Is 
she not becoming more lenient to- 
wards Protestantism day by day ? 
Did not the Pope's representative, 
Archbisoop Satolli, decide in favor 
of those Catholics whose ideas are 
truly American?" God's Word tells 
us that the devil sometimes comes 
as an angel of light, so as times al- 



most to deceive the very elect. j D 
our opinion that is just what Rome 
is doing now. Her apparel is soft 
and white, her voice is sweet, her 
form is beautiful, and people may 
well be excused for thinking a [| 
danger is .past. Her change from 
former ages is not, however, achanae 
of heart, but beneath those glittering 
vestments he who has studied her 
history and marks well may see the 
scarlet beast in all its hideousness, 
Rome is tolerant because she must 
be. If she is what she professes to 
be, let her cease her attacks upon 
our free institutions, let her members 
show that they are the true children 
of God, let her cease to worship the 
virgin instead of Christ, and let her 
priests in America cease to swear 
submission to the old fox of a 
tyrant whose throne is on the bank 
of the Tiber, then and not till then, 
may we feel that all danger is past, but 
for the present we must continue to 
regard her as the most hideous 
enemy of American liberty. 

D. S. ESHLEMAN, '94. 



The Practical Yalue of a College 
Education. 

In our last issue we spoke of a 
higher culture, particularly in its re- 
lation to the welfare of the individ- 
ual. In this article we propose to call 
attention to the bearing it has had 
upon the management of the affairs of 
the Nation. All true lovers of their 
country refer with pride to the ex- 
ceptionally long roll of able public 
men and sagacious statesmen that 
our country has produced in lie f 
short history. Because a few ot 
these, like Patrick Henry and Lin- 
coln, have made a brilliant record 
despite their lack of opportunities id 
youth, superficial observers some- 
times conclude that few of our pub- 
lic men have been college-bred. 
quite the contrary is the fact. Fro" 
an article by Prof. B. A. Hinsd^ 
superintendent of schools, C L 
land, Ohio, recently published m tQ 
Christian Standard of CinciM*! 
Ohio, we clip the following : 1 
" Several years ago a c*» ^ 
student went through the \& 
members of the Continental ^ 
gress from 1774 to 1789, and W 
ported that of the 350 men who "J 
held seats in that body, 118, or , 
third of the whole number, were 
lege graduates. Some time late 
other investigator reported, »' ^ 
painstaking search, that of the ^ 
men who had up to that tim e £ - lt 
elected or appointed to sea ^ 
Congress, counting claimants j5 
were never seated, 1,773, wl1 
again one-third of the wll0 . le [ e o[ 
received a classical, college 
iberal education. Dr 



Fcflo* 8 ' 



Iowa University, read a paper 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



13 



m 

?e 

»g 
tier 
the 

$88. 

,mt 

to 
?on 
»era 
ren 
the 
her 
rear 
f a 
ank 
len, 

but 
e to 

iOUS 



lege 

of a 
;s re- 
ivid- 

call 
had 

irsof 
their 
ie ex- 
diblic 
that 

1 her 
>w of 

Lin- 
ecord 
ies in 
some- 
r pub- 

Bat 
from 
isdale, 
fjlev* 
in the 
iniiat'' 



t i. e Rational Educational Associa- 
tion at Saratoga, in 1885, in which 
jje o-ave the results of a very careful 
'nciuiry into the relations of our col- 
lege education to public life. He 
showed that about one-half of one 
per cent, of the young men of 
[be country graduate from the col- 
leges and that ninety-nine and 
one-half per cent, do not ; and he 
then inquired 'for the relative part 
that these two classes have enacted 
and the relative success each has 
o-ained in the affairs of our country. 
If a college education is of no ad- 
vantage or practical value,' he said, 
then it will appear that only about 
one-half of one per cent, are college 
graduates in all positions of honor 
and trust.' He then analyzed the 
membership of the Fortieth, Forty- 
tirst. and Forty-second Congresses, 
extending from 1867 to 1873, and 
found that thirty -two per cent, of the 
House of Representatives and forty- 
six per cent, of the Senate were 
known to be college graduates, which 
is certainly a good showing for the 
colleges. The following table pre- 
pared by Dr. Fellows, covering the 
entire period of our National history, 
is both curious and important : 



•etui 



3are 
list oi 
Con- 

[ he * 
hob* 1 

gre col" 
ater^ 

> e5 ' n 
- 

le ^ 





Whole 
number. 


Known 
( ollege 
Graduates. 


Per cent, of 

College 
Graduates. 


Presidents U. S. 
Vice-Presidents V. 


17 


11 

10 
19 
16 
19 
14 
7 
21 


65 


&c's of State. 


20 
29 
33 
31 
30 
14 
38 


50 
65 
48 
61 
47 
50 
53 

53 

61 


" ofTreas'y 
" of War. 


j' of Navy 

of Interior.... 
Attorney Gen's 
Postmaster Gen- 
erals... 


Shakers of House 
nep s... 


30 


16 
16 


Associate fudges of 


26 


Hair* s C 

W\ justices of r 
». o. C 


41 
6 


30 
5 


73 
83 


Total.... 


315 


184 


58 



— uiiu-uuti ui one per 

, nt - of the young men who are 
n own to have been college gradu- 

of 8 m fiUecl nft y- ei gkt per cent. 

the above Federal offices since 
t je beginning of our country's his- 

y; and ninety-nine and one-half 
Don Ce n t " °^ tue m, wno uave Deen 
fort-' 00 ge g radu ates, h ave gained 
dn?'" two P er cent - of the same offices 
ttn JJg the same period." 
Pron' ."^ e ^ ows advances another 
conn - i0n that is of interest in this 
the , t - I ° n ' nam elv: "That among 
sue,. ons ot " houo1 ' and honorable 
W e m Iife > the P er ceil t. of col- 
c r g as ^ rarl nates who gain them in- 

plaoe° S V 1 - P ro l )01ti °n as the office or 
This 18 & Uer or more important." 
by th pr eposition is fully sustained 
Ce nt p * 0n 'ing table showing per 
Ho Us ' Si'ad nates : 

B^&::::::::::::::::::::::::S 

ef Jultio" 1 ^ 8 of Supreme Court 73 

^ slices of Supreme Court 83 

ie t our readers note a few 



facts which Dr. Fellows shows to be 
clearly proved by his investigations: 

First, " that college graduates in- 
clude about one-half of one per cent, 
of the young men of our country ; " 
second, " that these college gradu- 
ates have filled fifty-eight per cent, 
of the chief National offices for the 
past hundred } T ears;" third, "that 
the higher the rank or position, the 
larger the per cent, of college gradu- 
ates who occupy it." In minor 
offices, also, observation will con- 
vince any unprejudiced mind that 
men of liberal culture are usually in 
the lead in proportion to their num- 
bers. — Palladium. 

Members of the United States 
Senate in 18S6; 23 percent, had a 
common school education; *7T per 
cent, academic or collegiate. 

Members of the House of Repre- 
sentatives, United States, 1886 ; 32 
per cent, had a common school edu- 
cation ; 68 per cent, academic or col- 
legiate. 

Of the Judges of the Supreme 
Court in 1886 ; 8 per cent, were edu- 
cated in public schools; 92 per cent, 
in academics or colleges. 

Of Cabinet officers, beginning with 
Washington's Cabinet ; 15 per cent, 
had a common school education, and 
85 per cent, collegiate. 

Of Presidents, beginning with 
Washington ; 2 per cent, were edu- 
cated in common schools ; 98 per 
cent, in academies or colleges. 

Vice Presidents ; 20 per cent com- 
mon schools ; 80 per cent, collegiate. 



Junior Rhetorical. 

The second division of the Junior 
Rhetorical gave a most delightful 
entertainment on the 21st inst. 
They were greeted by a good audi- 
ence, whose appreciation was ex- 
pressed in prolonged applause. Pro- 
sessor McDermad led in prayer. 

Mr. Will H. Kreider in his maiden 
effort showed why the foreigner 
should be excluded in '93. His 
forceful manner and patriotic ex- 
pressions gave a freshness and inter- 
est to his subject. 

The Catacombs, in an essay, were 
discussed by Miss Mary Batdorf. 
She traced their origin and showed 
the different uses made of them. 

The eulogy of ex-President Hayes, 
by Mr. G. K. Hartman, was a fitting 
tribute to the memory of one who in 
his life was prompted by the most 
unselfish motives, and who believed 
that to serve his party best is to 
serve his country best. Miss Maggie 
Striclder made an appeal for wo- 
man's entering politics in the sense 
as the present age demands it. She 
pleaded for her as queen of the home 
to mould and train the future Legis- 
lators and Representatives. 

Mr. D. S. Eshleman, on " Roman- 
ism in America," voiced the senti- 



ment of every true American. We 
give it on another page, hence all 
may see how true are his words. 

The music was excellent. The 
piano solo, by Miss Elvire Stehman, 
was just long enough, and played 
with that grace to make it enjoyable. 

Miss Wilson's vocal solo was well 
sung. A little more fullness of voice 
would have improved it. 

" I'm One of the Ticklish Kind," 
by Horace Crider, carried the au- 
dience by storm. He was encored. 

The Ladies' Quartette — " The 
Cuckoo " — by Misses Sleichter, 
Flint, Forney and Gingrich, showed 
a remarkable compass of voice, and 
was rendered in good style. 

Prof. Deaner has maintained his 
reputation in always giving public 
"e'xercises of a high literary charac- 
ter. A. 



Labor and Think. 

We educate, if we educate truly, 
for the sake of making more man- 
hood in a man. Education has re- 
lation to success, to a reputation, to 
profit pecuniarily. We do not ignore 
that relation, but it is secondary. 
The primary reason why men should 
be educated is that they need more 
manhood. If a man dwells in a tav- 
ern all his life he does not feel the 
need of much education. If a man 
pursues a mechanical life, the educa- 
tion is limited that he feels the 
need of. We send our boys to col- 
lege if they are going to be preachers, 
or lawyers, or professors, or literary 
men, to educate them for the pro- 
fession they are they are to follow ; 
but if a man is to be a sailor, or a 
builder, or a farmer, he is not sup- 
posed to need a college education. 
Education is esteemed according to 
its marketable value in the depart- 
ment in which a man is em- 
ployed. Knowledge is sought or 
neglected according to whether or 
not it is regarded as an element of 
success in a man's business relations. 
It does not enter into the apprehen- 
sion of men that education is the de- 
velopment of what a man is, and that 
knowledge is useful because it con- 
tributes to that development. They 
do not look upon the acquisition of 
knowledge as making more of one's 
self. If you were to look at the 
whole sphere of men's lives you 
woul find that there is a fundamental 
low-mindedness in regard to the 
mass of mankind as to the necessit}' 
of education. You will find that the 
great majority of mankind are 
searching after anything rather than 
knowledge. It may almost be said 
of men in this respect "Eyes have 
they, but they see not; ears have 
they, but they hear not." Things 
are every day taking place around 
them from which they might derive 
valuable knowledge, but they never 



14 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



question them. They see in the sky 
phenomenon which might teach them 
lessons of wisdom, but the}' do not 
interrogate them. They might learn 
many things from the birds and in- 
sects which come under their notice, 
but they do not. The goods which 
they are continually handling do 
not provoke inquiry into them. 
They go into their store in the morn- 
ing and stand behind the counter all 
day serving the customers, and their 
object is to win patronage. The 
fabrics which come from the Orient 
suggest to them no question of man- 
ufacture or of political economy, 
They buy and sell them for two, five, 
or ten years, and never think of 
making an inquiry into them. 

I perceive that many persons are 
employed in the manufacture of in- 
teresting machinery who know 
nothing in connection with it but 
the mere mechanical routine of 
their work. I perceive that fre- 
quently persons who are conversant 
with books know nothing about the 
production of them — nothing about 
the process of binding them, nor 
about the material with which they 
are bound, nor about many other 
curious things belonging to them. 
They handle the books from day to 
day, from week to week, from month 
to month, and from year to year, 
and all they think of is selling them 
and getting the money for them. 

Men have the price with which to 
get wisdom in their own calling; 
whether they are in the store, in 
mechanical pursuits, or on the farm, 
their business is filled with elements 
that should stimulate them to in- 
quiry, and ) et there are multitudes 
of young men who go on and on, 
with very little curiosity, with very 
little application, and with very little 
accumulation of knowledge. It is 
too bad! There are a great many 
young men who do not drink, who 
do not give way unduly to their ap 
petities, who are well dressed, who 
are obedient, who have the favor ol 
their employers, who are very cor- 
rect in their conduct, and with whom 
their is nothing the matter except 
emptiness. They are empty, and 
they do not know it. — Henry Ward 
Beecher. 



Day of Prayer. 

The Day of Prayer was observed in 
a most fitting manner b}' the faculty 
and students. The regular duties 
were suspended from 9 to 11 o'clock. 
The opening services were conducted 
by Prof. McDermad. President 
Bierman briefly gave the object and 
significance of the meeting, then tell- 
ing of what had been done for the 
College in a financial way. 

Prof. Shott spoke of the relation 
of education to the State, and the 



tendency of the educational work in 
England and America. Miss Elvire 
Stehman represented the Y. W. C. 
A. work in College, and Horace 
Crider that of Y. M. C. A. Mr. G. 
K. Hartman read a very appropriate 
article on the "Significance of the 
Day of Prayer." 

Rev. Lewars, of the new Lutheran 
Church, gave a very stirring address, 
speaking most commendably of our 
work, and expressed a deep interest 
in L. Y. C. Rev. Spayd gave the 
closing remarks. 

The prayers were sincere and spir- 
itual. The meeting was in every 
particular what such an occasion 
should be. There should be many 
more such. May God bless what 
was said and done to his Glory. 



Women as Inventors. 

The steady increase of patents 
granted to women since scientific 
studies have been opened to them 
explains in part why inventions by 
that sex have been heretofore so 
rare. A list recently published gives 
the number of patents granted to 
women inventors by the United 
States Government, from the year 
1190 to July 1, 1888, as two thousand 
three hundred. After 1809 to 1815 
only one patent was issued. From 
1 857 the number of women inventors 
increased rapidly. In 1870 the num- 
ber was sixty ; in 1887 the number 
reached one hundred and seventy- 
nine. If last year's list were pub- 
lished, it would probably show a 
still more rapid advance. And these 
inventions take a wide range, from 
mere household and dress inventions 
to railroad journal boxes and sub- 
marine telescopes. In addition to 
the better scope and invitation for 
inventive genius which wider know- 
ledge gives, the more independent 
position of women now xequires less 
moral courage on their part to appby 
for patents than would have been 
necessary at an earlier period. — New 
England Magazine. 



An Evening with Dickens. 

- The Sophmore and Freshman the- 
torical under Prof. Lehman, on the 
evening of January 28, gave a very 
interesting public exercise in the 
chapel. " An Evening with Dick- 
ens " was the general theme. A large 
crayon of Dickens graced the ros- 
trum, which was especially made for 
the occasion by Miss Ditttnar, 
teacher of art. 

There was a large and appreciate 
audience present. 

The speaker made the exercises 
very interesting by the uniqueness 
of characters selected. All acquitted 
themselves well. The music was of 
high order. The solo, " Ivy Green," 
by Miss Ella Pennypacker deserves 
special mention. 



At Rest. 

We clip the following from one of 
our Reading (Pa.) exchanges: '*]jjy 
Anna Bertram Bierman, of Berne 
Station, this county, died of dropsy 
on Monday, the 6th inst. Agedfjj 
years. 

" She was born February 1, 1339 in 
Upper Berne township, where she 
lived nearly all her life. At the age 
of fourteen she joined the Lutheran 
Church, of which she was a consist- 
ent member to the day of her death. 
She was remarkably well versed in 
the Holy Scriptures, and, having an 
excellent memory, could quote 
readily and correctly from them, al- 
most invariably naming book, chap- 
ter and verse. 

"She was a great reader and her 
general information was extensive. 

" In May, 1839, she was married to 
Mr. Benjamin Bierman, who, with 
four children, survives her. Among 
these are President Bierman, of 
Lebanon Yalley College, and Rev. 
George F. Bierman, of East Harris- 
burg. 

" For the last three months pre- 
vious to her death she Avas a great 
sufferer physically, but her faith 
rested in God and she died in peace." 

RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereas, It has pleased Al- 
mighty God to call from time into 
eternity the mother of our beloved 
and esteemed President. Therefore, 
be it 

Resolved, That we, as students of 
Lebanon Yalley College, extend to 
him our heartfelt sympathy in this 
sad and sorrowful bereavement. 

Resolved, That in the death of 
this good and pious old mother, * e 
are again reminded that " it is 
all of life to live, nor death to m 
but we know that in the sight ol 
God " all things work together WJ 
good to them that love God " an" 
that your loss is her highest gai"- 

Resolved, That a copy of the* 
resolutions be sent to our wow 
President, and that they be pubhsWJ 
in the Annville Journal and Cotf* 
Forum. 

Maggie Strickle, 
S. Garman, 
H. W. Crider- 



Our Exchanges. 

The Review, of Lowell, ^ s jjJ. 
the Dickinson Liberal, of Wi" (i . 
port, Pa., are two of our new j 
changes. . } 

The Oak, Lily and Ivy conta' D 
good original story. 



The benefits of the literary f^j 
are thoughtfully considered m 
of our exchanges. ^ 
The Otterbein Aegis is a w el ^ 
monthly visitor. " A Bicyd e 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



15 



in Europe " is an interesting article 
\ n the last issue. 

The College Student presents an 
attractive appearance. It is neat, 
contains good type and is well 
edited. 

Every individual should be the 
sculptor of his own monument. His 
own hands should ply the mallet and 
the chisel, not in the way of carving 
it out of the lifeless and unsympa- 
thetic marble, but in erecting an 
organic or living structure of beauti- 
ful and symmetrical proportions. — 
Mercersburg College Monthly. 

We are at all times the product 
of two potential factors — one our in- 
dividual self, the other a combina- 
tion of those external influences 
which either actuate or restrain us. 
—High, School Times. 

It is said they have a newly in- 
vented machine at Yale for measur- 
ing! how tired a student is. This 
will cause a great revolution in col- 
lege affairs, for the professors can 
now feel the mental pulse of the stu- 
dent and determine what pressure of 
lessons and examination he can 
-Ursinus College Bulletin. 



PERSONALS. 



Miss Emma Dittmar, teacher in art, 
spent Saturday, the 11th inst., at 
Lebanon. 

S. R. Huber paid a pleasant call 
to his many friends at school on 
t0 1 Thursday, January 26. 
is I Mr. A. Lutz, from York, paid a 
pleasant visit to some friends at 
[ College January 19. 

Mr. J. B. Marknard, of Gettysburg 
seminary, spent Sabbath, January 29, 
ver y pleasantly with his friends here. 
I The President was called to the 
side of his mother January 27. 



She 
time 



was lying seriously ill at the 



Wm. M. Hain, while on a visit to 
Ration, made us a pleasant call. 
D r - Hain is a rising attorney of 
■wrisburg. 

J*k Elmer Ganer, '81, was married 
^Miss Mary Collier, of Hastings, 

gy friends here send their u„ 
*'shes. 

i^j - G. L. Shaeffer paid a short 
n ere ;er y Pleasant visit to the boys 
9th ° n lv ^' lurs ^ a y evening, February 
I BihV i * las i ust Umon 

| vi,^! Seminary to fill the Potts- 
taM. ar S e made vacant bv the 
*J hof Rev. Baltzell. 

ors ^ Srs> Harp and Fleok, propriet- 
Purol Middletown Guide, have 
tff | ^ uased the Frederick Examiner. 
dep ar( . n ^ ratu lute them on their new 
V e t ? re > their push and pluck will 
fe r Uern success. The world is 
to acknowledge merit 
1 exists. Express your con- 



victions in a manly way, and the 
applaudit of all true honest people 
will follow. 

Mr. H. Lenich Meyer, who is at 
present pursuing the studies of the 
academic course, has accepted a posi- 
tion as teacher in a Normal School 
in the western part of the State. Mr. 
M. contemplates leaving for the new 
position at the end of the term. 
May success crown his efforts. 

Mr. H. Lenich Meyer made a bus- 
iness trip to Williamstown on the 
3d inst. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Palma non sine Pulvere. 



It is natural with one class of men 
to wish for better things ; if good 
work in society has attended our 
efforts heretofore, comparatively 
speaking, we have reached the second 
degree, for better results are ours ; 
with this to encourage us, we hope 
to reach to the best before the year 
closes. 

We made some few improvements 
in hall recently, such as ; replacing 
the old window blinds with new ones, 
and rearranging the library ; about 
fifty dollars' worth of very valuable 
books have been received during this 
term from different sources, one set 
of five volumes, valued at thirty dol- 
lars. Our appreciation of such re- 
ceipts is very great. We would be 
glad , to acknowledge the arrival of 
more books from our good friends, 
and give them all the glory in re- 
cording their names as contributors 
to our library. Our librarian's name 
is W. C. Gable. 

We are very grateful for the liberal 
patronage of the gymnasium, nearly 
all the students have joined and are 
looking after the physical man in 
systematic training. 

Another very pleasant feature of 
this term, was the honor given us by 
a visit from our sister societ}- — the 
Clionians, on Friday evening, Feb- 
ruary, 3. Some of the ladies ad- 
. ' '^d the society; the kindness of 
their remarks and the encouragement 
we received from them will not be 
forgotten soon. Ladies, j^ou have a 
standing invitation to visit the Kalos, 
any time. 



Fhilokosmian Literary Society. 



Esse Quam Videri. 



Society affairs have moved along 
very quietly during the past month, 
very little of interest having taken 
place with the exception of the 
regular discharge of the society 
duties. 

We are pleased to have one of our 



old members, D. G. Kreider, again 
in our midst. Mr. Kreider intends 
taking active part in society work. 

Our regular election of officers 
was held on the 27 ult. The follow- 
ing is the results of the election : 

Pres., G. K. Hartman ; Vice Pres., 
Chas. Sleichter; Rec. Sec, I. G. 
Hoerner; Cor. Sec, 0. E. Good; 
Treas., S. F. Huber; Critic, S. T. 
Meyer; Chaplin, H. W.Crider; Jan., 
E. K. Rudy ; Editor, W. H. Kreider. 

W. M. Hain, Esq., of Harrisburg, 
an ex-member of the society, visited 
us on the evening of the 3d inst. 
His visit was a short one, as he 
wished to take the 9 o'clock train for 
Harrisburg. 

Several public school students 
from Annville were present with us 
on the same evening. 

We are always encouraged by the 
presence of visitors in our midst. 

Their presence shows their interest 
in us and their words of encourage- 
ment stimulate us to greater effort in 
our work. We extend to all a 
hearty welcome to visit us whenever 
convenient to you. 

Clionian Literary Society. 

Virtute et Fide. 



Our meetings since vacation have 
been very interesting and beneficial 
to all of us. Our little band is 
gradually increasing as the students 
realize the necessity of belonging 
to the society. Society work is 
something no student can afford to 
miss. It is a drill which every one 
needs and which will be of help to 
each one many times in her future 
career. The new member all take a 
lively interest in the work. We wel- 
come all new members most heartily, 
and would be glad to see the faces 
of some of our ex-members more 
frequently in our hall. 

The officers for this term are : 

Pres., Minnie Weinman; Vice 
Pres., Mabel Saylor; Rec. Sec,Sallie 
Saylor ; Cor. Sec, Ella Pennj-packer ; 
Critic, Edith Sherrick; Treas., Estella 
Stehman; Librarian, Ella Black; 
Chaplin, Mary Batclorf; Pianoist, 
Elvire Stehman. 

On the evening of Dec. 9, 1892, 
we held our first joint session with 
the Kalozeteans. It is needless to 
say that the evening was spent very 
pleasantly and profitably. Let us 
hope that we may enjoy similar ses- 
sions in-the future. At 7 o'clock the 
Kalos. joined us in our hall and w r e 
then proceeded to the election of 
efficers for the evening, with the fol- 
lowing result : 

Pres., Maggie Strickler; Sec, 
Elvire Stehman ; Critic, Mr. Penny- 
packer; Chaplin, Mr. Garman. 



16 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



The following interesting pro- 
gramme was then rendered : 

Music— Instrumental Duet, Miss Saylor. 

Address—" True Nobility," Mr. Garraan. 

Recitation, Miss Pennypaeker. 

Vocal Solo Miss Wilson. 

Paper— "Whittier, His Character," Mr. Mayer. 

Reierred Questions—" What is Woman's In- 
fluence? Mr. Pennypacker. 

Essay— " White Washing," E. Clara Stehman. 

Instrumental Solo, Mr. Gable. 

Debate— Resolved, "That woman have been 
the prime movers of more reforms than 
men." 

Affirmative, Miss Strickler and Mr. Kindt. 

Negative, Miss Sherrick and Mr. Sloat. 
Music— Instrumental Solo, . . Miss Batdorf. 
Olive Branch Miss Weinman. 

Miss Musser, of Mountville, spent 
from the 11th to the 13th in the Hall, 
as the guest of Miss Weinman. 

Miss Sherrick visited Palmyra 
on the 11th and 12th, and was enter- 
tained by Miss Emily Loose. 



KATAKEKOMMENA. 



President-elect Cleveland's major- 
ity in the Electoral College is 108. 

The L. Y. C. pins are of sterling 
silver. The College colors, blue and 
white, are in enamel, and the letters 
L. V. C. in silver. 

Rev. Wilton M. Smith in address- 
ing the Y. M. C. A. at its anniversary 
meeting in New York, reported that 
of the 300,000 young men in that 
city not more than 75,000 ever enter 
a church. 

Harvard College, it is announced, 
will hereafter not pay scholarship 
money to rich men's sons who do not 
need it. 

Harvard Athletic receipts for the 
past year foot up $58,441.59, while 
the expenses were $50,529.05. 

Mr. Edwin P. Elliott, the imper- 
sonater, gave a veiy unique and en- 
tertaining entertainment in the Col- 
lege Chapel on the 8th inst. He 
knows how to make an audience 
laugh. With his mirth and fun he 
associates that which instructs. 

Vick's Floral Guide for 1893 is 
surely a beauty. A novel feature 
are the many beautiful sentiments on 
the different flowers which are in a 
form to preserve. Ten cents to 
Vick's Sons, Rochester, N. Y., will 
bring this beautiful souvenir floral 
guide to your home. 

The P. O. S. of A. of Annville 
celebrated their twenty-fifth anni- 
versary on the evening of the 7th 
inst. with a banquet. 

Our ladies are emphatically op- 
posed to crinoline. 

The manly appearance of the boys 
who tacitly agreed not to shave till 
the down could be seen have called 
in the tonsorial artist, and a most 
wonderful change has been made. 
Some were scarcely recognized. 
Others suffered from the cold. 

Wychoff, Seaman & Benedict, 
manufacturers of the Remington 
typewriter, paid $10,000 for the first 
Columbian half dollar coined. The 
coin will be accompanied by a sworn 



statement from the mint that it was 
the first one coined. 

Colonel James R. Randall, author 
of " My Maryland," has left the ed- 
itorial chair of the " Augusta News," 
and will reside in Baltimore. 

An immense aerolite has fallen at 
Pozaldez, a town in the province of 
Valladolid, Spain. Scientists from 
Madrid have gone to examine it. 

The 4th inst. was the tenth anni- 
versary of the officially recorded 
birth of Civil Service Reform in the 
United States. 

Ten girls in a composition class in 
a Cincinnati school were told by 
their teacher to write a telegram, 
such as would be suitable to send 
home in case of a railroad accident 
while traveling. One of the girls 
wrote : " Dear Papa, Mama is killed, 
I am in the refreshment room." 



ESTABLISHED 1865. 

Standard and Reliable 
Clothing at Reasona- 
ble Prices. All Our 
Own Make. Spring 
and Summer Stock 
Now Ready. 



LEINBACH & BRO, 



Cor. 8th and Penn Sts., 



READING, PA. 



A SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO STUDENTS AND CLERGYMEN. 



IF you wish to advertise anything anywhcf e at any 
time, write to GEO. P. HOWELL & Co., No. 10 
Spruce Street, New York. 

EVERY one in need if information on the subject 
of advertising will do well to obtain a copy of 
' ' Book for Advertisers, 1 ' 368 pages, pri.-e one dollar. 
Mailed, postage paid, on receiptor price. Contains a 
careful compilation from the American Newspaper 
Directory of all the best papers and class journals ; 
gives the circulation rating of every one, and a good 
deal of information about rates and other matters 
pertaining to the business of advertising. Address 
HOWELL'S ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce 
Street, New York. 



QUMBERLAND VALLEY KAILKOAD 

time table-dec. is, is92. 



Dowx Traixs 



A. M. 

Lv. Winchester 

" Martin b'g 

" Hagersto'n 

" Greencas'e 

" Ct amb'g.... 

" Shippens'g 

" Newvi le ... 

" Carlisle 

" Mechan'bg 
Ar. Dillsburg... 

" Harrisbu'g 8 05 



C'bg 
Acc. 



6 35 

6 55 

7 20 
7 11 



Ky'e Mr'g Day , EvW 
Exp Mail Exp j Mail 



No. 2 No. 4 No. 6 No. 8 X~ 



A. M. 

6 20 

7 03 

7 42 

8 06 
8 30 

8 52 

9 12 
9 35 

10 00 



Philad'a.... 
New York. 
Baltimore . 



10 20 

j 125 

400 

1 25 

A. M. I P. M. 



A. M. P. M. 



9 02 
9 51 



10 25 

1 25 
4 00 
1 25 
P. M. 



11 45 

12 09 
12 32 
12 53 

1 10 

1 35 
12 55 

4 43 

2 18 

6 50 
9 35 
6 45 
P. M. 



P.M. 

•-• » 

310 
40U 
426 
506 
520 
541 
607 
6 34 
705 
7 

10 { 
3 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily excqt 
Sunday at 5:55 a. m., 12:30 p. m., 3:45 p. m. stopping! 
all intermediate stations, arriving at Harrisburgj 

6:40a. m., 1:15 p. m., 4:33 p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg 
Chambersburg. 



Up Trains. 


Win 
Acc. 


Me's 
Exp 


Hag 
Acc. 


Ev'g 
Mail 


C'bg 
Acc. 




Ni 


. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 No. 7 No.19 




P. 


M. 


A. 


M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


Lv. Baltimore.. 


1 1 


30 


4 


45 


8 53 


11 20 


425 


" New York 


8 


00 


12 


15 




9 00 


200 


" Philad'a 


11 


20 


4 


30 


8 50 


1140 


435 




A. 


11. 


A. 


M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


" Harrisb'g... 


6 


12 


7 


55 


12 30 


3 45 


800 








7 


15 


12 10 




810 

820 


" Mech <n'bg 


6 


27 


8 


11 


12 51 


4 06 


" Carlisle 


6 


57 


8 


31 


1 15 


4 30 


844 


" Newvi "■e.... 


7 


21 


8 


53 


1 42 


455 


9 08 


" Shippens'g 
" Chamb'g.... 


7 


40 


9 


15 


2 02 


516 


929 


8 


03 


9 


Hi 


2 30 


5 42 


950 


" Greencas'e.. 


8 


24 


H 


10 


2 52 


6 03 




" Hagerst'n... 


8 


55 


10 


2ii 


3 15 


6 30 




" Martinsb'g 
Ar. Winchester 


a 


in 








712 




10 30 

A. M. 






800 

P. M. 


P. M, 


A. 


M. 


P. M. 



Additional trains wil leave Harrisburg dailye** 
Sunday at 8:25 a. m., 10:35 a. m.. 5:15 p. m.,arritil! 
at Carlisle at 9:10 a. m., 11:20 a. m., 6:00 p. m. 
ping at all intermediate stations ; on Saturday 
tional train will leave Harrisburg at 6:20 p. va, 
ing at Mecha dcsburg 6:41 p. m., stopping atil" 
termediate stations. 

Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hasersl^ 
and New York on Keystone Express and NigM^ 
press east, and on Memphis Express and New 
Express WtSt. 



Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express 



and >'• 



Orleans Express between Philadelphia and Nn* 
leans. 





Vick's Floral Guide. 

For 1893 we have combined a most novel and charming feature in the way of hun- 
dreds of beautiful and appropriate poetical quotations from the best authors, making 
The Poets' Number Of Vick'S Floral Guide a source of interest and pleasure 
the whole year. The practical part contains Colored Plates Of Alpine Aster, 
Begonia, Dahlias, Dutchman's Pipe, Clematis, Pansies, Cannas, Corn an* 
Potatoes, hundreds of Engravings ; descriptions of the sweetest and most proline 
Pea— The Charmer, The Golden Nugget Corn, which was such a favorite las 
summer, new Roses, new Chrysanthemums, and scores of other grand and goo 
Names and prices of everything one could desire in way of Flowers, Vegetables, Plant !j Sn p' 
for only 10 cents, which can be deducted from the first order, thus it costs nothing. ^ 

JAMES VICK'S SONS, Rochester, N- x 



®k (tolleje Jfarttnt 

Lebanon Valley College. 



VOL. VI No. 3. 



ANNVILLE, PA., MARCH, 1893. 



Whole No. 59. 



EDITORS. 

EDITOR IN CHIEF. 



H Clay Deankr, A. M., 

Professor of Latin and Astronomy. 

FACULTY. 

E. Bknj. Bierman, A. M., Ph. D., President. 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
John E. Lehman, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 
Rkv. Jno. A. McDermad, A. M., 

Professor of Greek. 

John A. Shott, Pb. P». B., Ped., 

Professor of Natural Science. 
Mary E. Sleighter. A. B., 
Professor of English and Modern Languages. 
Caruie M. Flint, 

Professor of Piano and Voice. 
Alice K. Gingrich, M. A., 

Professor of Harmony. 
Ekma A. Dittmar, Teacher of the Fine Arts. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 
Cllonian Society— Miss Maggie Strickler, '94. 
Philokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— C. B. Pennypacker, '96. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 
Horace W. Crider, '93. 
D. S. Kshelman, '94. 
William II. Kreider, '94. 

PUBLISHING AGENT. 
H. Clay Deaner. 

All communications or items of news 
'hoiUrt be sent to the Editor in Chief. Sub- 
WpUons should be sent to the Publish- 
'"i! Agent. 

THK COLLEGE FORUM will be sent 
Monthly for one school year on receipt of 
nentj-Hve cents. Subscriptions received at 
a "y time. 

For terms of advertising, address the 
Fl ">Uslu„g Agent. 



nterecl a t the Post Office at Annville, Pa., 
as second-class mail matter. 



EDITORIAL. 



The sixteenth anniversary of the 
a'ozetean Literary Society will be 
' d °n the evening of April 7th 

C\ ?r0f " W ' J - Bal ^ell,ofReacl- 
g > Pa -, is the honorary orator. 

the 9° F " Shott 0,1 thc evening of 
CoiJrs inst - began in Annville a 

Tlie^ ° f SiX lectures on Chemistry, 
the p° UrSe is un der the auspices of 
enQ sylvania Chautauqua. 

Wg t r * """"" * 

^endi * gr8at P leasure in recora- 
R ee( j ln§ to our readers Win. B. 
' of Chambersburg, Pa., who 



offers especial bargains in roses and 
plants. See his advertisement in 
another column. 



A second request has been sent 
out to all members of the Philokos- 
mian Literary Society to send in 
their subscription to the new hall. 
It is desired that all will promptly 
respond, so that the work can be be- 
gun at an early date. 

President Bierman has been ap- 
pointed by Dr. Harris United States 
Commissioner of Education as a 
delegate and honorary Vice Presi- 
dent of World's Congress on Higher 
Education, which meets at Chicago 
in July, in connection with the 
World's Columbian Exposition. 



The Normal class of the College 
will be organized April 3d, at 9 
o'clock, and continue for ten succes- 
sive weeks. Its aim will be two fold : 
to prepare teachers to pass a credit- 
able examination, and more especi- 
ally, to fit them to do efficient and 
successful work in the school room. 

Prof. Shott, who is a graduate 
of the Normal Department of Ohio 
University, will instruct a class in 
Pedagogics and Mental Science. 
All the branches required on a 
teacher's certificate will be taught 
by skillful teachers. The tuition for 
the ten weeks is $8. For further in- 
formation appby to the President. 



The cantata, " The Garden of 
Flowers," was a perfect success. 
Despite the inclement weather a 
large audience was present. Part I. 
consisted of solos, duettes and 
choruses, which were all highly 
spoken of. Part II, " The Flour 
Garden," was novel in design and 
rendered to perfection. So highly 
pleasing was it that requests were 
made to have it repeated. 



President Bierman returned last 
week from his annual visit to the 
Virginia and Maryland Conferences, 
quite hopefully. The first named 
Conference met at Hawkinstown, in 
the Shenandoah Valley on the first 
day of March. He reports the Con- 
ference well attended, and the interest 
in educational matters above the 
average. This Conference has a 
school of its own within its bounds 
which is managed by a body of 
trustees elected by the Conference. 
Able professors are employed as 
teachers and much good is accom- 
plished. 

This fact, however, does not deter 
these zealous and faithful servants 
of God to direct their energies to- 
wards the building up of Lebanon 
Valley College. The plan of raising 
$25,000 met with favor and a com- 
mittee of six was appointed to devise 
a scheme whereby the Conference 
may raise its pro-rata share. 

The Maryland Conference met a 
week later at Boonsboro, Maryland. 
This is an old town and the United 
Brethren Church is well-known here. 
The early fathers of our Church la- 
bored here successfully, and the older 
citizens delight to rehearse many 
incidents showing the zeal and fidelity 
of these Christian heroes of bygone 
days. Here Newcomer labored, here 
Russell exhorted, here Markwood 
preached, and in consequence scores 
of souls were brought into God's 
kingdom. 

It is also gratifying to state that 
the Maryland Conference readily 
adopted the new plan of aiding the 
College, and after a number of 
spirited addresses by leading men 
of the Conference and visitors, an 
efficient committee was appointed 
to carry the plan into execution. At 
both these gatherings the fact was 
repeatedly emphasized that it is 
about time to stop passing resolu- 



18 



THE COLLEGE FOEUM. 



tions promising support, but doing 
virtually nothing during the year 
that follows. From what the Presi- 
dent reports and from what we have 
learned from other sources we look 
for substantial results the coming 
year. ' 

Prometheus Bound. 



BY PROF. J. A. M DERM AD, A. M. 



An important feature of this 
drama, is the use which the author 
makes of the effect of contrasts. 
This feature is conspicuous at the 
very beginning of the play, and is 
continued throughout a large part of 
its plot and progress. Accordingly 
we have at the beginning, in contrast 
to the malignity and coarseness of 
Kratos' speeches, the loftier feelings 
and nobler thoughts and emotions of 
Hephaestus. He first laments the 
circumstances of his position and the 
inexorable and relentless purpose of 
Zeus, which compels him, although 
unwilling, to chain the prisoner to 
the " storm-beaten gorge, " then in 
a passage of great beauty and pathos 
he describes the sufferings any tor- 
tures which Prometheus must un- 
dergo, first from the elements, as he 
is scorched by the fierce rays of the 
Sun, and then in turn pierced by the 
hoar-frost of winter; further also the 
weariness and solitude of his situa- 
tion, as alone he shall suffer through 
myriads of years. 

The loftiness and bravery of Pro- 
metheus' spirit, however, is shown 
by the fact that neither the taunts of 
the insolent Kratos as he flings his 
last scoffing words at him, nor the 
sympathy of Hephaestus as he de- 
scribes and compassionates his suffer- 
ings, is able to wring from the pris- 
oner's lips a single word. It is not 
until the chaining is done, and the 
executioners have withdrawn and he is 
left alone, that he gives utterance to 
his feelings and vindicates his career, 
His first speech is expressed in a 
passage which for intensity of pathos, 
loftiness of diction, and sublimity of 
conception, must always take the 
highest rank. He invokes the ele- 
mental powers and agencies of na- 
ture, from which the purest and 
loftiest sentiments in the elemental 
Greek worship had sprung, and from 
which their noblest mythology had 
originated ; he invokes them to wit- 
ness his wrongs and to behold the 
injustice of his punishment and the 
cruelty of Zeus. A chorus of ocean 
nymphs then appears on the scene. 
They are attracted by compassion 
for him, and express pity and solici- 
tude for his condition, and request a 
rehearsal of his past services and 
wrongs. This gives the poet ail op- 
portunity to rehearse the philan- 



thropy which Prometheus has exer- 
cised towards man, and the benefits 
and advantages which mankind came 
to enjoy by reason of the benefactions 
and generosity which proceeded from 
him. 

At this time also Oceanus ap- 
pears on the scene, and in a speech 
composed mostly of self-laudation 
and officiousness, professes his in- 
terest in the prisoner and his will- 
ingness to render him whatever ser 
vices might be required or accepted 
at his hands. Prometheus, in a tone 
of mingled indignation and con- 
tempt, bluntly refuses his aid, and 
finally sends him off in a very abrupt 
and undignified manner. 

This is to be accounted for, per- 
haps, for the reason that Oceanus 
was one who pursued a course of 
policy rather than of principle, and 
whilst cringing to the insolent and 
despotic power of Zeus, also desired 
to court favor with Prometheus. 
Thus seeing through his cringing 
and diplomatic policy, and himself 
at the same time suffering the venge- 
ance of Zeus, he would not be well- 
disposed to one who should come as 
a minion and vassal of his enemy. 
The reason is also partly to be sought 
in the principles which they repre- 
sent in the purpose of the play, of 
which we shall speak hereafter. 

In the next episode the chorus 
again with tears compassionate the 
fate of the sufferer, and tell him 
that all the tribes of Europe and 
Asia are in mourning because of his 
very pitiable grief, and then, to 
further emphasize the fact, they de- 
clare that nature herself is in sym- 
patic with him, and uttering a dirge 
of grief in his behalf. The poet here 
again manifests his consummate 
skill, in arraying the voice of the 
elements in unison with that of sen- 
tient beings, to heighten the already 
superhuman character of the play. 

Prometheus next gives a recital 
of the many benefits which he has 
conferred upon men and women, 
and the specific features of his bene- 
factions, in giving to them astron- 
omy, mathematics, the alphabet, 
medicine and divination. The chorus 
then implore that they may never in 
word or deed offend the gods, but 
that confident hopes and bright joys 
may be their lot in life, and finally 
remind Prometheus that more love 
for God and less regard for man 
would have been a wiser course, and 
would have secured to him a con- 
tinuance of that happiness in which 
his life was originally spent. 

After this the tragedy receives a 
new turn by the -introduction of 
the maiden Io, who in her toilsome 
wanderings approaches the cliff 
where the hero is chained, die re- 
ceives her graciously, tells her 
the story of her past life and 



sufferings, and also the things which 
it is ordained that she shall suffer at 
the hands of Zeus, until she is lil )er 
ated from her bondage. The intro- 
duction of this character is finely 
and artfully accomplished, both fb r 
lending variety to the dramatic 
action, and also for developing the 
design and emphasizing the lesson 
which the author intends. While it 
does not lower the standard of the 
dignity and loftiness of the author's 
plan, it serves to relieve for a time 
the tension of feeling and strain of 
thought which precedes, and also by 
the diversion which it affords, ad- 
mirably prepares the mind of the 
auditors for the terror and conflict 
of the final catastrophe. Consider- 
ing it in all its bearings on the cen- 
tral theme, it is a fine example of 
what in literature is known as relief. 

During the colloquy with which 
the tragedy ends, Prometheus inti- 
mates that though Zeus is so proud 
and secure, he will yet lose his power 
by a descendant of his, and that he 
alone can save him from ruin. He 
mocks at Zeus' thunderbolts and de- 
fiantly bids him work his will, be- 
cause they will be of no avail in the 
day of his overthrow and dethrone- 
ment. This is overheard by Zeus 
who sends Hermes, his messenger, to 
command Prometheus to reveal the 
secret of which he boasts. Prome- 
theus in turn scorns the 
of Hermes and asserts that all that 
Zeus can do cannot compel kin 
to yield, that although "a tempest 
should shake earth from her base, 
and although it should fiercely com- 
mingle the waves of the sea with the 
paths- of the celestial bodies, and 
although he should fling his bodytj 
Tartarus, in the 'stern eddies * 
necessity,' yet would he by no mes» 
extort from him the secret." Hero* 
then warns the chorus to withd* 1 
lest they be overwhelmed in ^ 
tempest of wrath, and lest the ijj 
of the thunder and crash of '» 
elements should phrensy their sense* 
and smite their minds with disWj 
tion. They, however, protest 
declare that they will share 
Prometheus whatever suffering a 
indignity may be necessary. H er ^ 
then gives them one more ^'° r w 
them rewf 
isclosed ' 
that 



warning, and bids 



that he had beforehand di 
them the peril and disaster - ^ 
approaching, and that when the) j 
taken in the net of Ate they ®^ 
not blame fortune, but tua . v $ 
should blame themselves for ^ ^ 
cast themselves into misfortune- ^ 
then withdraws from the s P ot ^ 
immediately the subterranean ^ 
of the earthnuake is heard 
mountains 



earthquake is heau'<, ^ 
is reel and totter, & nl .J 



crag to which the prisoner is | 



falls to pieces. At the same 
wind in a furious tempest bus 



tim el 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



t |ie scene, and amid the pealing 
thunder and the crash of the lightning 
the mountain is rent, and Prometheus 
disappears from view amid a whirl- 
wind of forces and passions as makes 
a dramatic finale never surpassed in 
literature. 

The interpretation of the tragedy 
bas always been a subject that" has 
been involved in much mystery and 
obscurity. This arises from two 
facts, the first of which is, that the 
first and third members of the triol- 
gy of which this forms a part, have 
been lost, thus leaving us no clue to 
the author's thought and treatment 
at both the beginning and the end of 
the subject. The second difficulty 
which attaches to the subject is the 
harsh and unusual lines in which the 
author has drawn the character of 
Zeus. The chief characteristic of 
the Greek mythology was the super- 
vicious reverence and awe in which 
their deities were regarded, and es- 
pecially Zeus, the chief parsonage of 
the Greek theocracy. The manner 
of treatment pursued here, however, 
may be accounted for by the fact 
that iEschylus meant to give a new 
and higher turn to the religious 
teaching of the time, and to divest 
the current religious views of the 
Greek, of many of the absurdities 
and monstrosities which belonged to 
them. 

This could be done, and doubtless 
was meant to be done, by the author 
111 portraying the character of the 
wef of their deities, with that harsh, 
•mplacable, unjust and relentless 
character with which he is depicted, 
m m reality showing the absurdity 
°t rendering worship, homage or love 
o such a being. It is certainly rea- 
dable to infer that a production of 
m extraordinary character, con- 
I3! n§ Such im Perative sentiment, 

n5- eX , alted P athoa « and such em " 
|T C denunciation, must have been 
led by a purpose commensur- 
m Y great. 

Wn S mentione d before, the play has 
"constructed to elucidate a prin- 
lQ a i great ' Profound and universal 
gnciple. Prof. Mahaffey says of 

is certainly no 



the 



P%: "There . 
Wed- 0f ^ sch ^. lus ^ichhas 



tthe 
pro 
the 



on 
of 



a greater impression 
lireek?! ' and few remnants ol 
to i t . uter ature are to be compared 
eto rn , n lts eternal freshness and 
and thi s myster y-" This sentiment 
for b Mystery are to be accounted 

•ome of fi 6 fact that U a PP eals to 
Probl em ? greatest principles and 

l 0r e C J\- at P ertain t0 man's na- 
^ e 'unH i 011 ' Progress and destiny. 
! *e It " yin g thought of the play, 

liirt,* 1 o j Justice or Right against 
iu _is thought is not imme 



Jatel 



PUvk ent Upon the surf ace of 
y > °ut is to be ascertained 



19 



from certain characteristics which 
are embodied in it. In the first place 
Prometheus is the son of Themis, 
the deity of justice, and appears to 
portray the Greek idea of Dicajosyne, 
the representation of the principles 
of truth, righteousness, equity, vir- 
tue — Justice ; while Zeus is a repre- 
sentative of the Greek Turannis— 
unjust, irresponsible, despotic power 
—Unrighteousness. It is with the 
conflict of these two that the tragedv 
is concerned. 

( To be continued.') 



History of the Tides. 

The most plausible theory yet put 
forth to account for the Solar Sys- 
tem is the nebular; it is likewise the 
one most generally accepted. In 
view of these facts"l shall not hesi- 
tate to make it the groundwork of 
this paper. If we trace back the 
history of our system we come 
eveutually to a state of matter so 
rare as to appear like a huge cloud. 
On this mass, inconceivably great as 
it must have been, we can have no 
tides, because as yet it is single in 
its sphere ; but when, for some rea- 
son, this prodigious mass separates 
into two distinct masses, with mo- 
tions relative to each other, tidal 
action immediately begins. 

Prof. Winchell defines a tide as 
" the prolateness of a body resulting 
from the attraction of another body." 
The original nebula? was undoubt- 
edly very hot and had acquired 
rotary motion. When, therefore, 
parts were given off to form the 
various planets, each part was given 
an orbit with the sun in the centre ; 
the sun raised a tide on the planet 
while the plant raised a reciprocal 
tide on the sun, the two tides bear- 
ing a ratio to each other equal to the 
relation existing between their 
masses. Coming down the list of 
planets till we reach the earth we can 
easily see that it existed at first with 
but one tide-producing body to act 
upon it, the sun supposing, of course, 
that the remaining plantes were too 
far removed for a visible effect, as 
they are at present. Again the earth 
and sun must have been so far dis- 
tant in a comparatively short time 
that the tidal forces must have been 
insignificant, as are our present solar 
tides. On the other hand, the mo- 
bility of the earth's particles was so 
great that but a slight attractive 
force would produce exceedingly 
high tides. But whatever can have 
been the effects of these primitive 
solar tides, no trace of them remains ; 
the earth has since undergone such 
changes of form and structure as 
have obliterated all such marks. It 
was then still in a molten condition ; 
many of the elements possibly still 
gases ; since then it has been cooled, 



incr usted, that crust raised and low- 
ered in various periods and finallv 
eroded and deposited as sedimenta- 
tion ; so that the only rocks that we 
can obtain have the impress of being 
of such origin. But all this took 
time, great periods of time such as 
we meet with only in the formation 
of worlds or where God is the chief 
actor. During this time the earth 
gave birth to a moon, which was to 
change her future to a remarkable 
extent and to cause her continual 
trouble in her diurnal motion. 

The particular period in the earth's 
history at which this phenomenal 
birth was to have occurred remains 
a matter of dispute among noted 
scientists. Mr. G. H. Darwin calcu- 
lates that the moon separated from 
the earth after the earth had attained 
the condition of a molten or plastic 
mass. This he believes occurred not 
less than fifty-two million years ago, 
probably much more. Prof. Win- 
chell and others suppose that it must 
have occurred at a much earlier 
period in our planet's history, while 
the while mass was still a self-lum- 
inous fire-mist. Mr. Darwin reached 
his conclusions from the fact that 
[as he supposed] the moon was 
simply a detached tidal mass. Sup- 
pose the tidal movement to coincide 
with the natural oscillation or swing 
of the earth mass, and, at a time 
when the centrifugal force was nearly 
equal to gravity, then the concur- 
rence of the two movements might 
quite overcome gravitation, and the 
tidally elevated mass might com- 
pletely separate from the earth. In 
this instance the sun alone would be 
the tide-producer, and tidal action 
would be the prime cause for the 
separation. The school of Winchell 
suppose the moon to have separated 
and primarily to have existed as a 
ring of nebulous matter with a ten- 
dency towards centralization. But 
as soon as the centre of mass in the 
ring should cease to coincide with 
the geometrical centre, a tidal action 
would begin ; and this would increase 
until the annulus should have be- 
come a spheroid. The former of 
these theories gives the tides credit 
for the greatest achievement in the 
earth's history, while the latter abso- 
lutely denies it. But we are not in 
possession of data enabling us to 
determine certainly which possible 
origin of the moon has been realized. 
Buth have their merits and both 
their defects ; and while many abler 
men have faltered and failed in the 
solution of this problem we can do 
no better at present than turn it 
over to the scientific genius of the 
twentieth century for further thought 
and freer discussion. 

However the question of the origin 
of our moon may be decided, we 
have adequate reason for believing 



20 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



that the earth and moon were formerly 
in such relations that the lunar tidal 
effect was ver} T much greater than 
at present. So enormous were these 
lunar tides that we loose sight of the 
solar tidal effects which played so 
important apart in our pre-lunar his- 
tory ; even at present under greatly 
changed conditions the tidal-produc- 
ing forces of the moon are far greater 
than those of the sun. The greater 
molecular freedom of the earth and 
the proximity of its tide-producer, 
the moon, having just separated, 
caused very high tides at first. Prof. 
Robert S. Ball "thinks it not un- 
reasonable to suppose that during 
Palaeozoic time the moon's distance 
was not one-sixth of its present dis 
tance from the earth." 

As the moon's tide-producing 
effect is inversely as the cube of the 
distance, at one-sixth of the present 
distance the effect must have been 
216 times as great as at present. 
If, therefore, the modern oceanic tide 
with the moon only 40,000 miles 
distant, must have risen 648 feet. 

" Such a rise in the Atlantic 
ocean," says Prof. Winchell, " would 
send a flood up the St. Lawrence 
river to Niagara Falls, into Lake 
Erie and all the way round to Chicago. 
It would convert all New England 
into an archipeligo and roll up the 
Mississippi nearly to St. Paul." 
Then the waters would be poured 
back from the continent, carrying 
with them enormous volumes of 
sediment. 

But now the geologist reexamines 
the data which belong to his province 
of investigation and finds no traces 
of such high tides ; no sediments re- 
snlting from such violent movements 
of the waters. What then becomes 
of Prof. Ball's ingenious theory ? 
Shall we declare it utterly ground- 
less ? Certainly not ; before Palaeo- 
zoic time were other vast aeons of 
duration, and vast processes of sedi- 
mentation, of which we have but 
scant knowledge. 

While Eozoic rocks do not yield 
the required effects of 600 feet tides, 
the materials are coarser and seem to 
have been more rapidly accumulated 
than those of any later system. But 
it is not necessary, even yet, to re- 
nounce the conception of primitive 
high tides. There is no evidence 
whatever that the oldest strata ever 
exposed to human study are the 
oldest that ever existed. But what- 
ever the rocks may testify or may be 
conceived capable of testifying, the 
fact of the slow recession of the moon 
leads necessarily to the inference 
that the astronomical condition of 
enormous tides must have existed at 
some time in the past. 

The slow but continual recession 
of the moon also needs a cause. 
That cause must be sought in the 



tidal forces operating between it and 
the earth ; for no other external 
power could produce the same effects, 
while to attribute it to an internal 
cause would be absurd. According 
to the process of world-making gen- 
erally believed, the motion of the 
tide-producer is in the same direction 
as the rotation of the tide-bearer. 
The apex of the tide will be, there- 
fore, in advance of the position of 
the tide-producer, provided the ro 
tary motion of the tide-bearer is 
relatively greater than the velocity 
of the tide-producer in its orbit. 
The tidal mass will exert an attrac- 
tion upon the moon in the direction 
of the line joining the moon and the 
tidal protuberance on the earth. 
While the greater part of this at- 
traction coincides with the mean 
centripetal force, a small component 
of it tends to accelerate the moon'o 
revolution. The faster a body with 
a curved orbit moves, the greater is 
the centrifugal force — the tendency 
to fly off tangentially. 

The centrifugal force of the moon 
being thus increased, there must be 
some means of reducing it to equi- 
librium with the centripetal. There- 
fore it makes for itself a new orbit 
of such dimensions as to affect the 
necessa^ results. Thus the moon 
continues to move in a constantly 
increasing orbit. Actual observation 
has discovered the same fact. Sup- 
posing this recession to have been 
going on for many millions of years 
we would find that at one time the 
orbit of the moon must have been 
coincident with the circumference of 
the earth. Thus reasoned Professors 
Darwin and Ball. If now the in- 
crease of the orbit of the moon was 
a constant and by observation we 
determined the present rate of re- 
cession, as well as the size of the 
orbit, the age of the moon could be 
accurately determined. Mr. Darwin 
finds that at this time synchronism 
existed between the earth's rotation 
and the moon's revolution, and that 
each period must have been about 
three hours. 

In a body as rigid as the earth 
the different parts affected do not 
readily respond to the action of the 
tide-producer, and consequent^ the 
tidal wave does not reach a given 
point until the tide-producer or the 
moon has passed it. From this cir- 
cumstance, known as the " Lagging 
of the tide," various interesting and 
important deductions can be made. 
One of them, the recession of the 
moon, we have alread3 r discussed. 
Another very important one is that 
it tends to, a retardation of the ro- 
tary motion of the earth. This is 
readily explained by the fact that 
the motion of the tide and the rotary 
motion of the earth are in opposite 
direction, and that either more or 



less checks the course of the other 
because of friction. Now the 
cosity of matter comes into action 
The tide-bearer not being rigid the 
retarding effect is not fully ex . 
perienced. The protuberant m ass 
tends to slide over the bodily n] as8 
and to undergo a translation. I na 
highly viscous mass the motion of 
translation will be but slight, and 
the protuberance will yield only as 
it can draw the whole body around 
with it. In a highly fluid mass the 
reverse is true. The greatest trans- 
lator}' effect is produced at the tidal 
apex on the equator. First, because 
that part of the tidal swell is nearer 
the tide-producer; secondly, the 
apex being more elevated than the 
portions lying to the north and 
south must be more susceptible to 
the attraction exerted upon it, 
Hence the equatorial regions will 
suffer a greater westward shifting of 
longitude than regions farther north 
and south ; so that lines once directly 
north and south will have north 
eastward trends north of the equa- 
tor and south-eastward trends south 
of the equator. The retardation of 
the earth's diurnal motion has pro- 
gressed for ages, and so* has the 
lengthening of our day. While it is 
supposed to have been but three 
hours at the birth of the moon, it is 
now twenty-four. 

In the course of time our planet 
will have been so much retarded it, 
this way as to produce synchronism ( 
in the motions of the earth and moon 
From this time on the sun and moon 
will be opposing forces, the soli' 
tide accelerating the rotary motion 
of the earth, the lunar retarding it 
The sun wins because of its greater 
attractive powers and gives the 
moon an increased centripetal for* 
This destroys the necessary equ' 1 ' 
rium between the centripetal 9 
centrifugal forces. To restore eq* 
librium the moon's orbit decree 
until the moon reunites with 
earth. By similar reasonings we J 
show that all the members ot 
solar system will eventually c 

bine - 

Of course this is the merest sp^ 
lation to the unprepared ra^i 
yet it is but carrying our theory 
their legitimate conclusions. 



r iesi 
0ti 



face. Thus all the water 



~~ — ~- fiirB 1 ^ 

ever a body is brought to ^ 
same side constantly toward^ 
producer, then some j^P 
changes must take place in "J 
pon »»' 

;ide ! 

accumulated on the remote' 
The atmosphere would ? o ^ {P 
the early incrustive periods 
earth's existence, the tW*^ 

Since 

various irregular pieces 



tribution of the fluids upon 

v< 

displaced from the nearer si 



would agitate the molten surf J 
break the thin primitive Cffl 



! 



C 

ii 

ti 
k 

■ 
li 
tl 
m 

K 
ei 
cl 
re 
ra 
tli 
til 

oi 
fo 
m; 
rrn 
ha 
ea 
aff 
no 
co 
he: 
in 
pa 
pei 
ma 

r 

Of 

ext 

ian 

out 

the 

rea 

as 

wai 

hig 

on i 

Jyk 

frac 
ove 
Thi 
soli 
buil 
any 
crat 
sine 
beer 
Hi, 
•ev e , 

He 

ful 

still 

f R 
'ore, 

?1% 
'tea, 
only 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



•21 



1 

-qui 
m 
tK 

t 



i 
v 



wave reached the different points on 
tue same meridian simultaneously 
these parts would move in harmony 
a n<l there would be no transverse 
strains. 

Parts on the same parallel would 
receive successive changes and hence 
break their homogeneity. Thus the 
t $es would impress some character- 
istics upon the surface in a north 
an d south direction. What this 
impression may be is hard to tell, 
although it is morally certain that 
it must have been a weakening pro- 
cess. Other causes may have helped 
in the production of sub-meridianal 
trends. The tendency to a trans- 
lator motion of the tidal swell must 
have had some influence along this 
line, as previously stated. We see 
the results of this early predeter- 
mination of meridional trends in the 
great mountain ranges of the West- 
ern Continent. We must not con- 
clude that we have in this an only 
reason tor the direction of the great 
mountain system, but rather one of 
the many causes operating at the 
time. One writer expresses similar 
opinions on this same subject in the 
following language: "The earth's 
mass must have suffered a screwing 
motion, so that the polar regions 
have travelled a little from west to 
east relatively to the equator. This 
affords a possible explanation of the 
north and south trend of our great 
continents. Also a large amount of 
lieat has been generated deep down 
in the earth, and some very small 
part of the observed increase of tem- 
perature in underground borings 
may he attributed to this cause." 

The tidal elevation and depression 
°f the earth's crust not only caused 
extensive fractures along the merid- 
la ns, but furnished occasion for the 
outflow of molten matter through 
the fractures. The tidal influences 
reached the molten interior, as well 
as the more rigid crust; but the 
j Va ve raised on the liquid would be 
"gher than the corresponding tide 
on the solid crust, so that the under- 
^' ln g liquid escaped through any 
jactures which might exist, and 
^erflowed the surrounding surface, 
'fis molten outflow cooling .and 
^'fying around the border, would 
ua up a crater-like elevation of 
y conceivable magnitude. These 
^teriform eminences -have long 
be ° e ceased to exist on the earth 
^• a ^ 8e °f the extensive denudation 
' °h has so materially changed 
*h hing . in si g ht On the moon, 
fu[ re eros i v e forces are less power- 
still 01 ' P° ssi Wy wanting, they are 

j^ Se en to exist. 
f 0r e tr 'geration is the most powerful 
s[ l0 6 w hich contributes towards the 
it s „. f enin g of the siderial day, but 
, ctl on is calculated by Thomson at 



0ri e six-thousandths of the tidal 



wave ; and this last action cannot be 
annulled by any other forces, which 
act sometimes in one. sometimes in an- 
other direction ; and which in course 
of time cease to act, the tidal wave 
acting always for millions of years 
in the same direction. Thomson as- 
sumes that the earth is on the whole 
a solid body ; others believe in a 
liquid interior. It cannot become so 
solid as not to yield to tidal influ- 
ence. This must produce an exten- 
sive molecular displacement, a crush- 
ing of the rocks and elements in the 
earth. The consequence is the de- 
velopment of an enormous amount 
of heat. Here we have at least a 
partial explanation of the heat in the 
earth and the attending phenomena 
of earthquakes and volcanoes. By 
actual observation it has been dis- 
covered that some relations exist 
between the moon and earthquakes. 
Earthquakes are more frequent when 
the moon is in perigee than when in 
apogee ; also more frequent with the 
moon in the meridian than the moon 
in the horizon. Theories to account 
for these coincidents are still want- 
ing. 

What is true regards tidal action 
on the earth and its moon may be 
conceived as equally true with all 
the planets and their satellites. 
There is, however, some difference ; 
the moon is much larger relatively to 
its primary, the earth, than any one 
satellite of the other planets com- 
pared with its primary. Hence, 
tidal effects on the earth are much 
greater. In the case of the contract- 
ing terrestrial mass one man sup- 
poses that " there was for a long 
time nearly a balance between the 
retardation due to solar tidal friction 
and the acceleration due to contrac- 
tion, and that it was not until the 
planetary mass had contracted to 
nearly its present dimensions that an 
epoch of instability could occur and 
the moon be born." Since the con- 
ditions of instability of a rotating 
mass of fluid have not yet been fully 
investigated we can not accept the 
above theory as very accurate. It 
has been calculated that the force of 
attraction from the moon upon every 
particle of matter comprising the 
earth is about ° f the weight 

of the particle. We need, therefore, 
have no doubts as to the possibility 
of such great effects being produced 
by the tides, as the separation of the 
earth into two parts and driving 
them hundreds of thousands of miles 
away ; the determining of the direc- 
tion of vast continents and mountain 
ranges; the production of an enor- 
mous amount of internal heat ; the 
possible production of earthquakes 
and changes of climate; and the slow 
but certain lengthening of the terres- 
trial day, thus limiting and defining 
the existence of plant and animal 



life. All these vast changes can be 
traced to one simple principle — the 
mutual attraction of every particle 
in the universe for every other. 

S. T. Meyer, 



Use of Classical Training. 

The question of taking the classics 
out of the college course is one which 
is agitating the minds of the Ameri- 
can professors to a great degree, and 
we are sorry to say that in some in- 
stitutions action in that direction 
has already been taken. This is a 
movement which in a short period of 
time will work a gi*eat detriment to 
the rising generation. The classics 
are the great medium through which 
we must pass if we would become 
great novelists, essayists, histori ans, 
scientists, philosophei-s and clergy- 
men. Our poets were cultivated by 
ancient poetry and Grecian architec- 
ture. The ancient Romans were 
students of Hellenic literature. The 
study of classics is an indispensable 
mental discipline. They are neces- 
sary implements of culture. They 
develop our mental powers, and bet- 
ter enable us to understand ourselves 
and the surrounding circumstances. 
They communicate to us that knowl- 
edge which is most needed in order 
to have our minds well disciplined. 
They convey valuable information 
Discipline precedes information be- 
cause power precedes acquisition; 
they are both necessary. Discipline 
gives power to acquire information, 
and results in culture. If classics 
were abandoned, well cultivated 
minds would cease. We do not by 
any means think. that mathematics 
do not cultivate and discipline the 
mind ; for mathematics follow as the 
next means of discipline. The ques- 
tion is often agitated, that we do not 
need the dead languages to buffet 
with the stern realities of life. Mr. 
John Stuart Mill has well said that 
" We need to know more than the 
one thing that is to be our principal 
occupation." If we would be suc- 
cessful in our occupation, whatever 
it be, we must have a general knowl- 
edge and broadened views of the 
subjects which confront us in every 
day life. Too many of our college 
men resemble Mr. Spencer, because 
they cannot readily translate the 
classics ; they imagine it does them 
no good. Too many seek for wealth 
and think that the road to wealth is 
not by studying classics, and on ac- 
count of their avarice desire the at- 
tempt to trample under foot those 
who, in the eyes of the people, are 
traveling a road to greater wealth. 
If classics would offer their value in 
dollars and cents, all would be wor- 
shipers of Latin and Greek. Some 
people say we do not need classics 
to study English literature and other 



22 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



sciences. Where did our literature 
and science originate. Its dawning 
was at the time that Latin and Greek 
were most extensively used. There- 
fore, if we would become well versed 
in literature, its origin, its princi- 
ples, its sciences and the innumerable 
other resources underlying literature 
and science, we will study the clas- 
sical. 

We should follow more closely 
the examples laid down by the Ger- 
mans, who turn out the greater part 
of our best educated men. During 
their course at school they spend 
one-sixth of their time at mathe- 
matics and two-sixths at languages. 
Classics are immeasurably superior 
to modern languages as a means of 
mental discipline. The study of the 
nouns, adjectives and their case end- 
ings, also the verb with its different 
moods and tenses, the construction 
and peculiar forms of the different 
parts of speech, which must be 
hunted from the word, back to the 
root, is an indispensable mental dis- 
cipline. Every word has its special 
place to complete the sense, and if 
that word is not used in the proper 
place the sense is incomplete. In no 
other language de we find such com- 
plicated forms, construction and 
sentences as in the classics. Their 
structure is regular, but highly 
complicated. So to see the full im- 
port of each sentence, we must give 
it the closest thought. We learn 
more grammar by the classics than 
in any other way. It is then we 
learn how to properly construct 
sentences. What does English, 
French or German grammar amount 
to? Simply as debris of classical 
language mixed with barbaric ele- 
ments. The modern languages are 
too near our own modes of thinking 
to help us enlarge our knowledge. 
If we would be deep thinkers we 
must be led in a different line of 
thinking than that which is so 
closely allied to our own. 

None of the modern languages 
have stood the great test which 
the classics have endured more than 
twenty centuries. Only a dozen gen- 
erations have read Shakespeare ; but 
Homer has led the way to literary 
morality for a hundred generations, 
with Plato, Virgil and Horace not 
far behind. Our modern languages 
change so often that they become 
unfit for us to lay our great basis of 
culture. We do not want to build 
our foundation on something which, 
probably, in a short time will be 
moved ; but want to build it on a 
foundation which will remain fixed 
and permanent. In order to be suc- 
cessful, we need know more than 
ourselves ; we need a vocabulary in 
which is contained many words 
which, in some respects, are similar, 
but have different shades of mean- 



ing, and by the means of this ac- 
quired vocabulary we can express 
our thoughts in words and commu- 
nicate them to others. Thus we are 
able to make use of the great power 
with which humanity has been en- 
dowed. 

Our country is crowded with ele- 
mentary mathematical instructors, 
but not with teachers of Latin and 
Greek. It is because one who has 
gone through arithmetic can teach it 
pretty satisfactorily ; but one who 
goes through elementary classics 
can, by no means, teach them. It 
requires more skill and knowledge of 
the advanced classics in order to 
teach them in any degree satisfac- 
torily. 

We need the classics to understand 
English and to broaden our range of 
knowledge and better comprehend 
the underlying principles in every 
sphere. We need them as a means 
of cultivation. The structure of 
every sentence is a lesson in logic. 
Thus by studying the classics we 
become well versed in different parts 
of grammar. Latin is the mother of 
modern tongues ; it is the language 
of law, history, empire and collective 
movements of men. Greek is the 
mother tongue of pure thought, the 
perfect process of human reason, the 
inexhaustable source from which we 
borrow all our new terms. Modern 
sculpture is principally from that of 
Greek. Our artists choose rather to 
follow after Grecian architecture 
than after that of any other nation. 
Men of to-day are what the Greeks 
were historically, stoics and epicu- 
reans, dogmatists and skeptics, mate- 
rialists and idealists; and innumer- 
able other ideas, are handed down 
from the Greeks. It is impossible 
to find an equal for the classics as a 
center of instruction. Experiments 
have been tried at colleges and uni- 
versities, and the result was that 
those who took this course in the 
classics were far better mentally 
trained than those who pursued a 
different course at the same time. 
Colleges talk of dropping the clas- 
sics. By no means ought we lay such 
a foundation for our rising genera- 
tion. But let the classics be kin- 
dled in every mind until the intellect 
of every college student shall burn 
bright with them. They contain the 
most precious literary treasures of 
the race, and on this account let pro- 
fessors continue to teach Latin and 
Greek until we can make a better 
substitution. S. F. Huber, '94. 



Public Rhetorical. 

On Saturday night, March 18th, 
the second public rhetorical exercise 
by the Senior Class was given in the 
College chapel. 

The attendance was good, largely 



made up of young people, which 
be regarded favorable. 

The exercises were interspersed 
with music which was unusually 
good, and the unanimous sentiment 
of all present was that the present 
teachers are by their industry and 
success popularizing that depart- 
ment. 

Prayer was offered by President 
Bierman. 

The first orator of the evening, 
Mr. Simon P. Bacasto, had for his 
subject, " Weighed but found Want- 
ing," in which he handled the 
writers of fiction and their products 
without much mercy. He earnestly 
advocated the reading of solid 
matter. 

He was followed by Miss Elvire 
C. Stehman on " Science and Re- 
ligion." The controversy the speaker 
claimed is not between science and 
religion, but between scientists and 
religionists. The church under the 
domination of papacy hindered pro- 
gress for many years, and not until 
the reformers brought more free 
untrammeled thought and action 
into the church did the world ad- 
vance. 

Mr. Horace W. Crider spoke quito 
well on the evil influence of " Habit," 
and showed in foi-cible language the 
advantages of good habits. 

A very appropriate eulogy ou El- 
mer Ellsworth was pronounced i 
Harry H. Sloat. ' The foul murder 
of this young hero served to rouse 
the whole patriotic North to action 
and thus crush the curse of seces- 
sion. 

" The Fifteenth Century " was the 
subject of a well-delivered oration 
by Miss Minnie Weinman. No cen- 
tury in human history has its eqiw 
for important epochs and advanced 
steps in literature, art, science and 
discovery. 

Mr. Samuel T. Meyer read a very 
creditable production on " The 
tional Horse of America." Wbil« 
the so-called thorough-bred is 
English product, the trotter is jj 
American. Horse-racing ma)' I 
censured because a species of g alD , 
ling is almost invariably connect 
with it, but the same objection n*i 
be made against holding P°P U ^ 
elections because wagers are m a 
on their results. ^ 

" Labor Organizations " was 
subject of Mr. John L. Mey* 
oration. The oration was well j 
livered and the speaker took 
position that too many are connec ^ 
with organizations which airn no ^ 
much to improve the conditi° n #I1 
the masses as to promote their 
interests. 

The entire evening's entertain 
occupied one hour and thirtyj ^ 
utes and no one was weary ° 
close. — Annville Journal. 



at 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



23 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 

Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Palma non sine Pulvere. 



The election of officers for the 
spring term reminds ns of the close 
of this term and the beginning of the 
next. We will close this term with 
an agreeable satisfaction of the work 
done; not one interest of the society 
suffered, and the special work pre- 
paratory to our sixteenth anniversary, 
to be held April T, has moved along 
nicely. All plans relative to this 
occasion are completed ; the success 
of the entertainment now depends on 
the individual members who will 
have part in it. 

In case we do not reach all out- 
good friends by special invitation, 
let me, in behalf of the society, use 
this means to request your presence 
in the College chapel, April 7, at our 
anniversary exercises. We desire to 
see as many of our friends present as 
possible. Then don't wait for an- 
other invitation, but come, and give 
us the honor of your presence. 

The election of officers resulted as 
follows: President, C. B. Penny- 
packer; Vice President and Chap- 
lain, H. W. Mayer; Recording Sec- 
retary, S. Garman; Critic, H. H. 
Moat; Censor, G. A. L. Kindt; 
Librarian and Organist, W. C. Gable. 
Rev. J. G. W. Harrold, pastor of 
the U. B. congregation at Ephrata, 
be with us in the spring term as 
an active member. Rev. Harrold will 
graduate in the class of '93. 

Rev. W. S. Ebersole, professor of 
lireek in Cornell College, Mt. Ver- 
j«>n, Iowa, finds his work pleasant 
m the midst of a warm-hearted and 
intelligent people. He is secretary 
01 the faculty and professors' meet- 
and has charge of a New Testa- 
ment Greek class in the Sunday- 
school. Mrs. E. is also actively en- 
s d gecl m literary work. 

Ph ttokosmian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



e &dof 6 D0W almost cached the 
As w anotller ter m's work at school. 
I th e [ook hack over the work done 

soci e + C r00m as wel1 as in tue 
to rv f 1 While [t nas been sa tisfac- 
WbS f many re spects, yet we can 
I mia «. reca11 instances in which 
th e welV. have been im P r oved, and 
Rebv ? f tlle societ y promoted 

Mvil ' T hile at tlie same time tlie 
Pr fit e( j Ua v niembers would have 
*liich y tne incre ased efforts 
fork. aie required for thorough 
Death 

*M has t r t C6ntly entere d our midst 
^ost i u A ken away one of Annville's 
§ Ql y respected citizens, Hon. 



J. H. Kinports. Mr. Kinports was 
an honorary member of the Philo- 
kosmian Literary Society, and as 
such gave his support to the society 
in whatever it undertook, and he 
frequently remembered us in a finan- 
cial way. 

The members of the society turned 
out in a body at his funeral which 
was largely attended. 

Revs. G. L. Sheaffer and H. M. 
Miller, and Mr. H. B. Roop, ex-mem- 
bers of the society, were also present 
at his funeral. 

His death causes a vacanc}^ which 
it will be difficult to fill. 

On the evening of Feb. 24, the 
Philos had the pleasure of holding a 
con-joint session with the Clios. 

The occasion was a pleasant one, 
as sessions of any kind with the 
ladies always are. Besides the plea- 
sure of these meetings, there is an 
important benefit derived from them. 

On occasions of this kind excellent 
preparation by the performers is al- 
ways made, and thus these sessions 
are made more interesting and in- 
structive for the listeners and more 
beneficial to those who perform the 
parts assigned them. 

More frequent sessions of this kind 
would prove an advantage to both 
societies. David Keller, formerly 
a member of the society, made a call 
upon his friends at College, March 1. 

Mr. Stephen Huber, father of S. 
F. Huber, taking advantage of his 
nearness to Annville, while attending 
the Penna. Conference which con- 
vened at Harrisburg, made a brief 
visit to his son at the College. He 
came to Annville, Friday, February 
24, and remained over Sunday. On 
account of the Cantata held in the 
Chapel on the evening of the 10th 
inst., the society did not meet on 
that evening. 

But the Cantata was so ably ren- 
dered that those of us who were 
present did not regret that we were 
unable to hold a session of the so- 
ciety on that occasion. 

It was a complete success in every 
respect. 

The Martha Washington Re- 
ception. 

On Saturday evening following 
the 22d of February, the Clionian 
Literary Society tendered a recep- 
tion to the faculty and students in 
the parlor of the Ladies' Hall. 

The ladies wore cambric muslin 
dresses, white aprons, capes and 
caps — all their own handiwork — 
which made them look like the la- 
dies of Revolutionary fame. Their 
hair was white and worn in the style 
of that period. 

The gentlemen's hair was an iron 
gray which gave them an august ap- 
pearance and might have been taken 



for the elite of "ye olden time." 
Large handkerchiefs were worn 
around their necks. 

The reception committee, Misses 
Weinman, Saylor and Wilson gave 
all a hearty welcome, after which the 
ushers, Misses Pennypacker and 
Black escorted the guests to the 
cloak room. 

After all had assembled in the par- 
lor, Miss Sleichter introduced a 
number of games which made merry 
the entire party. 

"We may live without books— what is knowl- 
edge but grieving? 

W e may live without hope— what is hope but 
deceiving? 

We may live without love— what is passion 

but pining ? 
Hut where is the man that can live without 

dining ?" 

hence refreshments were served to 
keep him from dying. 

Several toasts were given by the 
gentlemen. Mr. Horace Crider, as 
spokesman, presented the society 
with a beautiful piano lamp, it be- 
ing an expression of gratitude and 
appreciation from the gentlemen 
students for the enjoyment of the 
evening. This handsome gift, com- 
ing so unexpectedly, filled the hearts 
of the Clios so full of joy that they 
could scarcely give expression to 
their feelings, yet the president, Miss 
Weinman, in a very fitting speech, 
accepted the gift. All repaired to 
the hall of the society, where they 
engaged in song. 

This gathering will remain fresh 
in the memory of the Clios when 
school clays are over. Clio. 



Hon. John H. Kinports. 

On Wednesday evening, March 8, 
at about 8 o'clock, the news passed 
rapidly from mouth to mouth that 
Hon. John H. Kinports had breathed 
his last. It was a shock to all, for 
although it was known that his ill- 
ness was serious, his demise was not 
expected so soon. His death was 
caused by a complication of diseases 
incident to his advanced age, for he 
had exceeded the allotted time, "three 
score years and ten," by 2 years, 1 
month and 17 days. They were 
years well spent. For he was identi- 
fied with every good work and enter- 
prise that came within the scope of 
his influence. Js T o move for improve- 
ments or advancement being con- 
sidered complete without his endorse- 
ment. Nearest his heart, however, 
was the welfare of the Sunday-school 
and church of his choice, having 
been one of the original organizers 
of the U. B. Sabbath-school and its 
superintendent for thirty-five con- 
secutive years, being its highest 
officer at the time of his death. And 
it was in accordance with a request 
made shortby before his last illness 
that the Sabbath-school took a promi- 
nent part in the funeral obsequies. 



24 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Born and raised on a farm he 
early evinced a decided tendency for 
mercantile life and when quite young 
became partner in a dry goods firm. 
In 1851 he was called to the office of 
Clerk of the Orphans' Court and the 
Court of Quarter Sessions ; at the 
expiration of this term he entered 
again into the mercantile business 
with Chas. H. Killinger, afterwards 
with H. H. Kreider and later with 
D. 0. Shenk, which firm continued 
to the end of his life. For ten years 
he served as Associate Judge of the 
Lebanon County Court. He was 
one of the original members of the 
U. B. Aid Society of Lebanon, Pa., 
and held directorship at his death ; 
was one of the organizers of Lebanon 
Valley College, a trustee for many 
years and always took a warm in- 
terest in its welfare ; was elected 
President of the Annville National 
Bank, when organized and continued 
in the office to his end. 

The interment took place yester- 
day, and was one of the largest 
seen in Annville for along time, the 
Bank officers and directors, officers 
and directors of the U. B. Aid So- 
ciety and the U. B. Sabbath-school 
in a bod} T having place in the funeral 
cortege. The family also is large ; 
ten children survive him. There 
were a number of beautiful floral de- 
signs, the bank sending an anchor, 
in which were the words " At Rest;" 
the Sabbath-school a large piece 
representing gates ajar, with the 
words, "Faithful to the End," and 
Dr. and Mrs. Wiltrout, of Schuylkill 
Haven, a " sheaf of wheat fully ripe," 
intertwined with roses. 

ThePhilokosmian Literary Society 
of L. V. C, of which the Judge was 
an honorary member, also attended ; 
officers of the Annville Shirt Com- 
pany, of which he was also president, 
and the Fire Insurance company, 
from whose monthly board meetings 
he had never once been absent. 

The church was crowded, both 
audience and lecture rooms, in which 
services were simultaneously held, 
Mr. Spayd and Dr. Hiester preach- 
ing in the upper room, and lie v. M. 
Mumma below stairs. A feeling of 
deep solemnity and sadness pervaded 
the entire assembly, and all realized 
that in the death of Mr. Kinports 
the entire community has sustained 
a deep loss. — " Annville Journal." 



Will Remain in Harrisburg. 

To the Editor of The Patkiot. 

Rev. W. H. Washinger, pastor of 
Otterbein U. B. church, corner Reily 
and Margaretta streets, received a 
call from Salem U. B. church, of 
Baltimore Salem church has been 
paying the largest salary of any 
church in the Eastern conference, and 
the next to largest salaiy in the 
United States of this denomination. 



Reverend Washinger has been very 
successful in his work in this city, 
and his present congregation would 
not hear to his leaving, so he has 
concluded to remain with them. 
May his efforts be blessed in the 
future as they have been in the past. 

A Member. 




REED'S 
ROSES 



AND SEED never fail 
to give satisfaction to all whi 
follow his culturd directions, 
which are sent with ever y order. 
Here is an otf er: Best trial 
pks. of Roses in America— Hi One itln.nts.all differ, 
ent, gooc 1 . kinds, strong growers, splendid roots, all for 
&>I.Ui>. 71'oroOe. Sample Rose or 3 pkts. flower seed 
with catalogue for 10c. Order at once. Mention paper, 
vv.u. li. itKKU Florist, Clhambcrsburg, Pa. 



ESTABLISHED 1865. 



Standard and Reliable 
Clothing at Reasona- 
ble Prices. All Our 
Own Make. Spring 
and Summer Stock 
Now Ready. 



LEINBACH & BR0„ 



Cor. 8th and Penn Sts., 



READING, PA. 



A SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO STUDENTS AND CLERGYMEN. 



TF you wish to advertise anything anywhere at any 
1 time, write to GEO. 1'. ROWELL & Co., No. 10 
Spruce Street, New York. 



EVERY one in need it information on tlie subject 
of advertising will do well to obtain a copy of 
' ' Book for Advertisers, ' ' 368 pages, pri. e one dollar. 
Mailed, postage paid, on receipt of price. Contains a 
careful compilation from the American Newspaper 
Directory of all the best papers and class journals : 
gives the circulation rating of every one, and a good 
deal of information about rates and other matter 
pertaining to the business of advertising. Add res* 
ROWELL'S ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce* 
Street, New York. 



QUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 
TIME TABLE— Dec. 18, 1892. 



Down Trains 



Lv. Winchester 
" Martinsb'g 
" Hagersto'n 
" Greencas'e 
" Chamb'g.... 
" Shippens'g 
" Newviile... 

" Carlisle 

" Mechan'bg 

Ar. Dillsburg... 
" Harrisbu'g 



Philad'a .... 
New York. 
Baltimore . 



C'bg 
Acc. 



6 15 
6 35 

6 55 

7 20 
7 44 



; o5 



KyV 
Exp 



No. 2 



A. M. 

6 20 

7 03 

7 42 

8 06 
8 30 
8 52 
912 
8 35 

10 00 



10 20 

125 
4 00 
1 25 
P. M. 



Mr'g 
Mail 



Day Ev'g 
Exp Mali 



10 25 

1 25 
4 00 
1 25 

P. M. 



No. 6 No. 8 



11 45 

12 09 
12 32 
12 53 

1 10 
1 35 
12 55 
4 43 
218 

6 50 
9 35 
6 45 



P. M. 

2 20 
310 
400 
426 
5 06 
520 

5 41 

6 07 

6 34 

7 05 
715 

10 55 

3 50 
10 40 
P. M. 



No. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily exce 
Sunday at 5:55 a. m., 12:30 p. m., 3:45 p. m. stopping 
all intermediate stations, arriving at Harrisburg 
6:40 a. m., 1:15 p. m., 4:33 p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg 
Chambersburg. 



Up Trains. 



Lv. Baltimore. 
" New York 
" Philad'a 



" Harrisb'g... 

" Dillsburg... 

" Mechan'bg 

" Carlisle 

" Newviile.... 

" Shippens'g 

" Chamb'g.... 

" Greencas'e.. 

" Hagerst'n... 

" Martinsb'g 
Ar. Winchester 



Win 
Acc. 


Me's 
Exp 


Hag 
Acc. 


Ev'g 
Mail 


No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 No. 7 


P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


1130 


4 45 


8 53 


1120 


8 00 


12 15 




9 00 


1120 


4 30 


8 50 


1140 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M . 


P. M. 


6 12 


7 55 


12 30 


345 




7 15 


12 10 




6 27 


8 11 


12 51 


4 06 


6 57 


8 31 


1 15 


4 30 


7 21 


8 53 


1 42 


4 55 


7 40 


915 


2 02 


516 


8 03 


9 40 


2 30 


5 42 


8 24 


10 10 


2 52 


6 03 


8 55 


10 20 


3 15 


6 30 


9 40 






712 


10 30 
A. M. 






800 
P. M. 


A. Id 


P. M. 



No. It 



C'bg 
Acc. 



N. u. 
Exp 

No. 



74 

P, M. 

u 

1041 
in 
11 
11 

9 5U 11 
11 fl 



Additional trains wil' leave Harrisburg daily excepl 
Sunday at 8:25 a. m., 10:35 a. m.. 5:)5 p. m., arriving 
at Carlisle at 9:10 a. m., 11:20 a. m., 6:00 p. m., sto 
ping at all intermediate stations ; on Saturday ad* 
tional train will leave Harrisburg at 6:20 p. m., arriv- 
ing at Mechanicsburg 6:41 p. m., stopping at allif 
termediate stations. 

Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hagersto«« 
and New York on Keystone Express and NigM** 
press east, and on Memphis Express and New Orle»» 
Express west. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express anJ W 
Orleans Express between Philadelphia and New 
leans. 





" For 1893 we have combined a most novel and charming feature in the way of hun- 
dreds of beautiful and appropriate poetical quotations from the best authors, making 
The Poets' Number Of VicH'S Floral Guide a source of interest and pleasure 
the whole year. The practical part contains Colored Plates Of Alpine Aster, 
Begonia, Dahlias, Dutchman's Pipe, Clematis, Pansies, Cannas, Corn ana 
Potatoes, hundreds of Engravings ; descriptions of the sweetest and most P rolin | 
Pea— The Charmer, The Golden Nugget Corn, which was such a favorite las 
summer, new Roses, new Chrysanthemums, and scores of other grand and goo Bu)bs 
Names and prices of everything one could desire in way of Flowers, Vegetables, Plan , yffi 
for only 10 cents, which can be deducted from the first order, thus it costs nothing. ^ 

JAMES VICK'S SONS, Rochester; N. * 



Lebanon Valley College. 



VOL. VI. No. 4. 



ANNVLLLE, PA., APRIL, 1893. 



Whole No. 60. 



an 



7fl 
p, y 
102 

104 
10 s 
n H 
us 

11! 
II II 
125 



alii' 



rbtEl- 



s ' 



EDITORS. 

EDITOR IN CHIEF. 

H. Clay Deaner, A. M., 

Professor of Latin and Astronomy. 

FACULTY. 

I. Benj. Bierman, A. M., Ph. D., President. 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
JohnE. Lehman, A. M., 

Professor of Mathematics. 
Ekv. Jno. A. McDermad, A. M., 

Professor of Greek. 
John A. Shott, Ph. B. B., Ped., 

Professor of Natural Science. 
Mary E. Sleichter, A. B., 
l'rofessor of English and Modern Languages. 
Cabkie M. Flint, 

Professor of Piano and Voice. 
Alice K. Gingrich, M. A., 

L'rofessor of Harmony. 
Emma a. Dittmar, Teacher of the Fine Arts 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 
Clioniun Society— Miss Maggie Stuickler,'94. 
I'Mlokosmiun Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society-C. B. Pennypacker, '96. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 
Horace W. Crider, '93. 
D- B. Eshelman, '94. 
William H. Kreider, '94. 

PUBLISHING AGENT. 
H-Clay Deaner. 



All communications or items of news 
unould be sent to the Editor in Chief. Sub- 
ppttons should be sent to the Publish- 
'"S Agent. 

Jn" E COLLEGE FORUM will be sent 
jnthly for one school year on receipt of 
^ly-tive cents. Subscriptions received at 
"y tune. 

PnM*, terms of advertising, address the 
"Wishing Agent. 

Enter ecl at the Post Office at Annvllle, Pa. 
a « second-class mail matter. 

EDITORIAL. 



College Day" will be observed 
on Hip r 

U a rst and second Sunday of 

JJas. D. 0. Siienk is noted for her 
Ej o aU(1 cll <>ice varieties. Her 
°*8are never without flowers. 



be 



Ut ry b r Course of lectures in chem 
Hq^ Jy Prof - Shott have been ver> 
Pa:!? Preciate(1 ' antl are of es- 



lnte Pest to the entire class. 



Tile - 

fcnti, ndow of Mrs. Jacob Sar- 

^rliittH ° St likc a tr °P ical garden. 
V t ^ he entire winter her flowers 
^miration of every one. 



The twenty -sixth anniversaiy of 
the Philokosmian Literary Society 
will be held on the evening of May 
5th. Prof. A. H. Gerberich will 
give the honorary address. 

Annvllle is noted for its beautiful 
and choice flowers. The magnolia 
tree in the yard of Prof. Deaner is 
surely "a thing of beauty." Its 
beautiful flowers have attracted 
crowds. 

J. Kenderson Kurtz, '84, of Pitts- 
burg, sent some very fine trees to 
the President, to be put in the re- 
cently purchased ground west of the 
campus. Your gift is highly ap- 
preciated. 



Prof. Lehman, with the aid of 
students, was making surveys and 
laying out the street which passes 
the campus. The additional ground 
when arranged will add greatly to 
the beauty of the campus. 

The cantata, " The Garden of 
Flowers," was given in Hummels 
town on the evening of the 13th 
inst. A large audience greeted them, 
whose appreciation of its excellence 
was manifested by the prolonged ap- 
plause and encores. 

Do you ever fish ? Read this. A 
live minnow in an annealed flint 
glass tube. One minnow lasts a day. 
You can use angle- worms, crabs, 
grasshoppers, or any bait. For 
circular and prices write Calvin V. 
Gratis, Natural Bridge, N. Y. 

The students in the musical de- 
partment are playing in turns dur- 
ing the chapel services. This change 
will be of great advantage to the 
pupils, as it gives them confidence 
and helps them to overcome the 
timidity so often seen in performers. 

Arrangements are in making for 



the oratorical contest under the 
auspices of the Prohibition Club. 
The contest will be held the latter 
part of May in the College Chapel. 
The winner will meet the winners of 
other colleges of the State in a con- 
test to be held in Harrisburg on 
June 6, 1893. The successful con- 
testant will be given a free trip to 
Chicago. Quite an interest is mani- 
fested in the contest here. 



Dear Brother in the ministry, 
much will depend on your efforts as 
to whether the " College Day " shall 
be a success or a failure. If you do 
the best you can for it, your duty 
will be discharged, and God will 
supply the rest. If not, who is to 
blame ? May we suggest that either 
on the day designated, or a week 
previous to it, you present to your 
people a plain but carefully-prepared 
discourse on the importance of our 
educational work and on the imme- 
diate needs of the College ? 

There are still some cards on hand 
to work "College Day" interests, 
and if any of our brethren wish to 
use them we will send the necessary 
number required, if requested. 



Honored Names in American 
Education. 



An important element in Ameri- 
can education has been the work of 
individual promoters of education, 
what we may call voluntaryism in 
education. It would be difficult to 
name the large number of enlight- 
ened men and women who have 
given a strong impulse to public 
education, both in its elementary 
and higher forms. Peter Cooper 
put $1,000,000 in his institution for 
the youth of his native city and 
country. Matthew Yassar invested 
about $1,000,000 in his college for 
young women; Judge Packer gave 
$2,500,000 to Lehigh University, 
where the tuition is wholly free ; 
George Peabody bestowed $2,000,- 



2G 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



000 on the common schools of the 
South, and John F. Slater $1,000,000 
on the education of the Freed men. 
Johns Hopkins founded his univer- 
sity and hospital at a cost of $3,000,- 
000 each. These are a few of the 
shining names that shall never be 
forgotten in the schools of the land. 
This element in American education 
cannot be overlooked. No other age 
has its parallel. These benefactions 
to education will continue. Men 
of wealth and enlightenment will 
nourish and swell the stream of 
knowledge that flows for the good 
of all. It will be understood that 
wealth can be nowhere so productive 
as when it serves to lead the mind 
to knowledge and the soul to virtue 
and Godliness. — Church and Home. 



Prometheus Bound. 



BY PROF. J. A. M'DERMAD, A. M. 



The interpretation of the lessons 
designed to be taught in this play 
has always been considered as a dif- 
ficult and unsettled subject ; indeed, 
so obscure has seemed the purpose 
of the author that almost every va- 
riety of interpretation has been put 
upon it. Most of these appear some- 
what fragmentary and partial, and 
fail to touch the true chords of the 
play in its interior nature and es- 
sence, and to unfold the meaning of 
the author in its comprehensive en- 
tirety. Prof. Patin tells us that the 
interpretations given may be sum- 
med up under six heads ; First, the 
historical, which makes Prometheus 
represent a ruler of Egypt or Scy- 
thia, who suffered in his struggles to 
reclaim his country and his people. 
Secondly, the philosophical, which 
holds it to be the image of the strug- 
gles and trials of humanity against 
natural obstacles. Thirdly, the moral, 
which place the struggles within the 
breast of the individual against his 
passions. Fourth, the Christian, of 
those who see in the story either the 
redemption of man, the fall of Satan, 
or the fall of man, divinely echoed 
from the Holy Scriptures. How- 
ever, Lord Lytton justly observes 
on this point : " Whatever theologi- 
cal system it shadows forth was 
rather the gigantic conception of the 
poet himself than the imperfect re- 
vival of any forgotten creed, or the 
poetical disguise of any existing 
philosophy." Fifth, the scientific, 
which regards it as the mere per- 
sonification of astronomical facts, as 
is the style in comparative mytholo- 
gies. Sixth, the political, the inter- 
pretation of Mr. Watkins Lloyd, 
who thinks the genius of Themis- 
tocles and the ingratitude of the 
Athenian people were the real ob- 
jects of the poet's teaching though 
disguised in a myth. Many of these 



seem to have a degree of reference 
to the subject, but all seem too par- 
tial to explain the whole conception. 
But we think that the triumph of 
justice is a conception that is broad 
enough in its extent to include 
many of the minor ones that are 
given, and at the same time suffi- 
ciently comprehensive and dignified 
to constitute a fitting exposition of 
the theme. 

In the first place we conclude 
thus, because the poet, being a man 
of stern theology and decided relig- 
ious convictions, would not have 
chosen a theme that is partial or sec- 
ular for the subject of a tragedy of 
such decided theological character 
as this presents itself to be. But 
the full exposition of a subject, such 
as Truth or Justice, cannot be fully 
demonstrated in the sphere of mortal 
beings alone, and therefore in the 
mind of a poet such as ^Eschylus 
was, would present a fitting theme 
for elucidation in the sphere of the 
immortals, or rather as is the case 
here, in the sphere of both the mor- 
tals and the immortals combined. 

In the second place we think that 
this interpretation, or a least some 
religious interpretation, is warranted 
because of the fact that Greek trag- 
edy was a large factor in maintain- 
ing and propagating the religious 
system and worship of the Greeks. 
It grew out of this principle and 
never grew away from it ; and it is 
this fact that has made the character 
which the author ascribes to Zeus, 
to become a barrier to interpreta- 
tion. It seems to be an anomaly to 
the whole idea of the Greek worship 
and theocracy, and appears from the 
ordinary standard of Greek thought 
to be inexplicable and unaccountable. 
Nevertheless it is there, and we must 
interpret the thought of an author, 
not by what he might say, or what we 
think he ought to say, but by what he 
actually does say. Just here I would 
remark in accordance with this view, 
the import of the tragedy is in the 
highest degree iconoclastic of the 
ordinary conceptions and character 
istics of the Greek theology and 
worship. This fact is apparent from 
almost every phase and condition of 
the action. The character of Zeus is 
drawn throughout as that of a harsh, 
unjust and tyrannical sovereign 
who has no regard for justice among 
the immortals, and no mercy or re- 
gard for the welfare of mortals. 

This fact, on the very face of it, 
ought to present one of the strongest 
arguments against the Greek re 
ligious system, and against believing 
in or doing reverence to such deities 
as are here described. Mather well 
says, although declaring his in 
ability to comprehend the author's 
design, that there is something of 
defiance and reproach of the Greek 



religion embodied in it. jEschyl^ 
doubtless thought in advance of hi s 
time, especially in religious matters 
and he here, perhaps, aimed to re! 
form the current views and beliefs 
in which the divine nature and re. 
ligious subjects were held. Doubt, 
less his penetrative vision and logical 
mind saw that the whole subject of 
the Greek religion was but a poetical 
dream, a splendid hallucination' 
and that the deities which they wor! 
shiped were but the idealized ex. 
pression of their own perverse 
sensual and superstitious fancies! 
without having any fact of reality. 
His clear, penetrative, enlightened 
vision saw ahead of his countrymen 
and his age ; and he appears to have 
conception of religious truth, 
moral character and divine power 
far beyond what the Greeks at- 
tributed to the cruel and tyrannical 
Zeus. This divine being or existence 
he foreshadows occasionally under 
the terms Fate, Necessity and Des- 
tiny. He is in this respect very muck 
like his contemporary, Socrates. 

The character of Prometheus, 
while not perfectly embodying jus- 
tice or right, yet rests on this prin- 
ciple as its support and defense. 
Throughout the insults and indig- 
nities which are heaped upon him, it 
is this fact which sustains his mind 
and gives vigor and strength to bis 
endurance and heroism to his pathos. 
It is this fact also that makes his 
spirit and defiance such a subline 
and mighty factor in the drams- 
Even the power and will of Zens 
cannot overcome it. We must re- 
member that the sole charge Q« 
which he suffers is his philanthroffl 
to man in resisting the will of Ze« s 
when Zeus purposed man's destruc- 
tion, and in afterwards elevati 
and ennobling man's condition, a" 
in conferring upon man the g 1 " 
fire. The key-note of his remo 1 
strances against his punishment 
the injustice and cruelty under m 
it is inflicted by one to" whom M| 
merly had been an ally and a fr' et 

The majesty and dignity 
which the part of Prometheus is | 
ducted at the opening of the P : 
also well befits the character y 
we have ascribed to him. A 
character was grounded in trut 
right, as we have intimated* 
superhuman heroism and loft> ^ 
ing which he maintains is m 
accord therewith. The digjy 
silence which he maintains * , 
opening of the drama is in b fl JT| 
with the heroic firmness and 11 
ing determination which he^ 
wards manifests and e $ 
throughout. If his purposj* y 
acts are laid in truth and j uS Ll 
has no need to be in a ^/.^i 
truth has eternity for its j 
and exposition. His pause 



set 

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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



an expression of the self-poised con- 
sciousness of his own inherent integ- 
rity- in which his spirit gathers cour- 
se for the coming confl et. The 
silence also makes his utterances 
and words more impressive when he 
does speak, as there are some 
silences which in themselves are elo- 
quent. The silence is finally broken 
by an appeal to the elemental powers 
and forces of nature from which all 
that was highest, purest and noblest in 
the Greek worship had sprung, and 
invokes them to be witnesses of the 
indignities and insults which he suff- 
ers at the hands of Zeus. This appeal 
is well fitted to stigmatize the whole 
system of the Greek worship, for it 
sets forth the beings whom they wor- 
shiped, not as righteous, just and be- 
nevolent, but as cruel, stern and un- 
just, and not fitted to command the 
reverence, esteem and love of intelli- 
gent beings. ^Eschylus has a strong 
conviction and persuasion of the 
characteristics of righteousness and 
truth, and in that respect differs ma- 
terially from the mass of the Greeks, 
whose conceptions of truth and 
righteousness, both in religious and 
civil affairs, was much perverted, 
compromised and strained. 

We must, however, remember that 
a character like that of Prometheus 
would not be one of ideal justice in 
the estimation of an enlightened sys- 
tem of ethics, like that which Chris- 
tianity presents ; although he may 
have been such in the estimation of 
•'•-chylus, influenced as his views 
»ere by heathen modes of thinking. 
Mall events, the standard of justice, 
«li»ty and right which is appealed 
» "ere is one that is higher and 
gander than the will of Zeus, show- 
n gthat ^Eschylus had a standard of 
W equity and divine law, which 

* & n ? 1 limited to the ordinary, vul- 
jj« f views of the Greek hierarchy. 
towi° I crifcerion of righteousness 
corir r he adheres instead of being 
' nate a nd conformable to the 
toir°!i s » is in direc t opposition 
of th settin g before the minds 
d es " . pe ?P le in the capacity of a 
tie 1 J ' inexorable and irresponsi- 
reiwr 1 "- lt is important also to 
ehoryg l - hat the j^gment of the 
to th e ' • ^ sometimes antagonistic 
the Ua • Spmt and bravery of Prome- 
ar e colored by the fact that they 

forthei - nt "P° n the wil1 of Zeus 
H Dst iee r C1 ' iterion of circumstances, 
H'ntsf SOverei gnty, which ac- 
I i(lt QomV man - y of tlle censures and 

The 8 which the y g ive - 
toti lat Case nere is vei T much similar 
1 10 hii a ? JoD > whose friends came 
Nerto i comfort llim , bufc instead 
Pro Ve( i . to reprove him, and thus 
fid n mi8 erable comforters. They 
er nor p 0m P relie nd Job's charac- 
h the '■• d's purposes with him. 
mterf ocutorg of Prometheus 



27 



do not understand the grandeur of 
his purpose nor the majesty of his 
spirit. The part he took in the bat- 
tle of the Titans may seem a contra- 
diction of justice 'and right, and 
would be such in a proper estimate 
of justice, but we must remember 
that it sometimes takes a revolution 
to establish right and effect justice, 
although we of course would not as- 
sume to believe that this was done 
in the present case. Yet in the or- 
dinary conception of the Greek my- 
thology this might have been said 
to be the case, as Cronos and his con- 
temporaries had themselves gained 
power in the same manner in which 
it was finally taken from them ; so 
that the part of Zeus, while it was 
wrong in itself, was on the other 
hand a Nemesis to Cronos to accom- 
plish the punishment of crime, and 
the fulfillment of its curse. To this 
same purpose, also to the part taken 
in the revolution by Prometheus 
was accessory. Another fact in the 
occurrence in also symbolically sig- 
nificant, that JSschylus considered 
the part taken by Prometheus as 
right, is the fact that before Prome- 
theus espouses the cause of Zeus, he 
obtains the consent of his mother, 
who was the deity of divine law and 
justice in the Greek theology, so that 
iEschylus represents him, to the 
Greek mind at least, as going with 
the consent and approval of justice. 

The episode of Oceanus' visit and 
reception seems at first unaccount- 
able and harsh. The interpretation 
of the character of Prometheus how- 
ever gives the key to its interpreta- 
tion. Oceanus was a deity of the 
older order and formerly was in op- 
position to Zeus; but, after Zens' 
victory, became his ally and servant. 
Here his yurpose is to play a twofold 
part, both to retain his allegiance to 
Zens and also to appear to secure 
the friendship of Prometheus. He 
however sees through the weak and 
ambiguous policy of Oceanus and 
spurns him. Oceanus came as a 
compromiser, but Prometheus, as the 
representative of right and equity, 
spurned a compromise with anything 
inferior to himself. So right knows 
no compromise with evil and injust- 
ice, but is in eternal antagonism and 
defiance against it. 

The part which Io plays in the 
drama, while important for the pur- 
pose of relief, is still more important 
in the interpretation of the author's 
meaning and the lessons he teaches. 
She is the daughter of Inachus, and 
has become the victim of Zeus, by 
whom she is compelled to torment- 
ing wanderings, and of the jealousy 
of Hera, who condemns her to suffer 
the torture of the Neatherd Argos 
and finally of the brize which pur- 
sued her continually with stings and 
punishments. In her phrensj'-stricken 



wanderings she approaches Prome- 
theus and learns from him both what 
she has suffered and what she shall 
suffer as the victim of the divine 
cupidity. Here is one of the strong- 
est reproaches against the Greek re- 
ligion and its gods that is imaginable. 
The treatment of Zeus and Hera to- 
wards her is in the highest degree 
cruel, unjust and capricious. The 
metamorphosis of Io into the bovine 
form is a representation of the real 
spiritual metamorphosis and degen- 
eration which the human spirit must 
always undergo by the worship of 
anything less than the only true and 
the living God. 

The courage and magnanimity of 
the hero continue unabated to the 
finale of the drama where it attains 
such a grandeur of elevation and 
majesty of purpose as well befits the 
character of the hero and the pur- 
pose of the play. Hermes is sent to 
announce to Prometheus that unless 
he obeys the commands of Zeus in 
revealing the secret about which he 
has been so proudly boasting, he 
will be destroyed by the vengeance 
of Zens. Prometheus boldly and 
stoutly defies the commands, and 
says that although Zeus may use all 
his power he cannot compel him to 
yield, and finally says that his 
threats will be unavailing when he 
shall be driven out of his sovereign- 
ity and be deposed from the throne. 
Here we see a symbolical representa- 
tion of the character of Prometheus 
as the impersonation of right and 
truth. Truth may be subjected to 
every sort of torture and indignity, 
figuratively speaking, and yet can- 
not be overcome or conquered, but 
is immortal and invincible. 

Finally the crash of the elements 
comes upon him. But amid the 
terror and tempest and commotion 
his spirit and purpose remain un- 
daunted and undismayed. His last 
words, however, as his first, are an 
appeal from the unjust and unhappy 
treatment of Zeus, by which he is 
made to suffer things reproachful 
both to mortals and to celestial and 
-ethereal beings to behold. Thus to 
the very close his spirit is sustained 
by the integrity of his character and 
the justice of his career, and he 
passes from view amid the conflict 
of elements, the crash of forces, and 
the convulsion of passions with the 
same tranquillity and heroism which 
marks his character throughout the 
play. This drama, appealing, as it 
does, to the greatest and most 
exalted sentiments and problems of 
the human mind, has gained an im- 
pression on the literary world to 
which its merits justly entitle it. 



A National College song book 
is to be published in Chicago next 
summer. 



28 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Kalozetean's Anniversary. 

On the evening of April 7th, col- 
lege circles at L. V. C, were en- 
riched by the event of the year, to 
Kalozeteans, the sixteenth anniver- 
sary of their society. The elegant 
invitations sent to their friends a 
few days in advance were a sign that 
the Kalos ment to render a good 
programme and to furnish a delight- 
ful occasion. In spite of rain and 
fog, a large audience found their way 
to the College chapel, where they 
were greeted by a fine display of 
flowers and ferns tastefully arranged 
upon the stage. 7:30 arrived, and 
the audience took up the signal given 
by the small boy at the entrance 
that the performers for the evening 
were being escorted to their posi- 
tions of honor. Their president, 
holding in his hand the gavel, the 
symbol of order, took his stately 
chair between two lilies blooming in 
white, the symbols of purity and 
truth, while above him floated in 
gold, Palma non sine Pulvere. 

After a brief pause the moderator 
delivered a short but appropiate ad- 
dress of welcome, stating the work 
of the society in the past, its present 
inspiration and its hope for the 
future. The first on the programme 
was music—" Oberon-Fantasie," by 
Messrs. Wm. Benbow and W. J. 
Baltzel, of the Mendelssohn Quar- 
tet, of Reading. This was fol- 
lowed by prayer by Rev. J. H. Von 
Neida, after which Mr. Edward 
Pengelly sang a vocal solo, a double 
number: (a) " Thou Art Like Unto 
a Flower," and (b) " The Stirrup 
Cup." The Kalozeteans were espe- 
cially fortunate in securing profes- 
sional musicians for the occasion. 
It is, therefore, scarcely necessary 
to make any comment upon the 
quality of the music. The names of 
the musicians are sufficient to indi- 
cate that each production was ren- 
dered with skill. 

Rev. J. G. W. Herold delivered 
the first oration, entitled " Patriot- 
ism." Mr. Herold delivered his ora- 
tion with few gestures and in an 
easy and effective manner. He de- 
fined patriotism as one of the noblest 
of affections. He cited illustrations 
from history which showed that na- 
tional ruin resulted when patriotism 
was not coupled with the fear of 
God. He made a strong appeal for 
a purer, loftier American patriotism. 

Mr. W. J. Baltzel then sang in his 
perfect manner a solo, " Happy 
Three." 

Gr. A. L. Kindt followed with an 
oration, entitled "Modern Selfish- 
ness." Mr. Kindt traced the inher- 
ent human attribute of selfishness in 
European nations at present; then 
discussed in a brief but clear man- 
ner the present tendencies in A mer- 
ican corporations, society and the 



churches. He proposed as a remedy 
the acceptance and practice of the 
teachings of Christ. 

The next delightful feature was 
music by the Mendelssohn Quartet, 
consisting of Miss Margaret Baltzel, 
Miss Annie Shearer, Mr. W. J. Balt- 
zel and Mr. Edward Pengelly. The 
Quartet responded promptly to an 
encore. 

The eulogist for the evening, C. 
B. Penny packer then delivered a 
eulogy on James G. Blaine. Mr. 
Pennypacker traced the brilliant 
career of the magnetic statesman 
through all the range of his public 
career as journalist, orator, historian, 
party leader, and legislator, and di- 
plomat. He gave as the cause of 
Blaine's success, strong personality, 
frankness, candor, sympathy with the 
popular aspiration, and his intense 
pride and ambition in the progress 
and power of the United States. 

The eulogy was followed by a vocal 
solo by Miss Annie Shearer. Her 
selection was well received. 

The next orator was H. H. Sloat. 
He handled the live subject, "Pater- 
nalsm," in a brief but comprehensive 
manner. He stoutly opposed the 
demands of agriculturists of the 
South and argued well for a reform 
in pension laws. 

After a vocal solo by Mr. Wm. 
Benbow an address was given by 
Mr. W. J. Baltzel. The speaker 
gave an interesting and well pre- 
pared account of "London as seen 
by an American." He gave a num- 
ber of amusing incidents to illustrate 
the difference between American and 
English ideas, and also to contrast 
American and English wit and 
humor. The exercises were con- 
cluded by music — " The Millers 
Moving," by the quartet. 

Success was the verdict of the 
audience, and the society felt that 
another milestone had been passed 
and kolozetenn honor maintained. 



Programme for College Day. 

We venture to suggest a pro- 
gramme for College Bay to be fol- 
lowed or changed as may be thought 
desirable: 

1. Singing. 

2. llesponsive reading of the Scriptures : 
Prov. 8. 

3. Prayer. 

4. Singing. 

5. Why observe this clay ? Brief address by 
pastor, superintendent of Sunday-school, 
or oresident of Y. P. C. U. 

6. Addresses by little children. 

(a) Little deeds. 

(b) Psalm 1. 

7. Singing. 

8. Addresses from youth. 

(a) God bless the little children. 

(b) Tennyson's Psalm of Life. 

(c) Tennyson's Builders. 

9. Singing. 

10. Addresses by young men or young wo- 
men. 

(a) What has Lebanon Valley College 
done for the Church. 

(b) The Church's duty towards the Leba- 
non Valley College. 

(c) A plea for Christian culture. 

11. Singing. 

12. Freewill offering for Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege. 

13. Benediction. 



A Brilliant Wedding. 

On thi 23d of March a pleasino 
social event took place at the rest 
dence of Mr. Peter Seltzer, No. ]^ 
North Tenth street, Lebanon, p. 
It was ihe occasion of the marring 
of his daughter Mary A., to the 
Rev. Grant L. Shaeffer, A. B. '91. 

Early in the evening the gu es ^ 
began to assemble until a laro f 
number were present. 

At precisely 6:30 o'clock the wed- 
ding march, by Wilhelm Schmeisser, 
was skilfully executed on the piano 
by Miss Carrie Seltzer, when the 
procession began. First came two 
lovely little girls, nieces of the bride, 
each bearing a large bouquet. These 
were followed by the ushers Mr. A, 
Seltzer, brother of the bride, and 
Rev. P>. P. Daugherty, '89, of Bali 
more, Md. Then came the bride 
leaning upon the arm of the groom. 
When they reached the centre of the 
large parlor they were met by the 
Rev. C. J. Kephart, A. M., pastor 
of Trinity IT. 15. Church, Lebanon 
who pronounced them man and wife. 

The bride was very becoming]} 
attired in a Mauve Poplin dfl 
trimmed with Persian lace. 

After all had congratulated the 
newly wedded pair and wished them 
a happy and prosperous voyage ora 
the sea of life, the guests were 
treated to a sumptuous repast ap 
propriate to the occasion. The pres- 
ents were numerous and handsome, 
consisting of glass and silverware 
chairs, rugs, &c. , 

One characteristic was noticattj 
that the presents with one or W 
exceptions were useful as well I 
ornamental. 

After a joyful evening had m 
spent the happy couple were J 
corted to the depot. At 9:15 o dm 
amid a shower of best wishes, m 
and old shoes, they took the ti- 
for Harrisburg en route to 1 
phia, where they spent a part ot ; 
honeymoon with the groom's bro j 
The Forum congratulates them ^ 
wishes them "God speed, ^ 
long and happy voyage m * , 
life, with just enough of J UI ^ 
enable them to appreciate tne 
in the end of life. 



Call Accepted 
Rev. Daniel Emery Bart** 1 ] 
accepted a call to the pastor 
the Congregationalist cm J 
Boylston Centre, near VYO ,j 
Mass. This is the old »°; ne o] . tl j 
of John B. Gough and wife, a£y 
very prominent and histori 
It is the only church in the 1 

St. Paul's Institute- a 
Asia Minor, will receive 
the will of Elliott F. S/iiep* 



para- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



■ess 



leu 
>vi 
ret 

af- 
ire* 
inn 
«i 

ibk I 

1 



r 



sin 



cal" 



H 



College Day. 

The advantages of a proper obser- 
vance of " College Day "are manifold. 
First, it affords the pastors of our 
fields of labor a special opportunity 
to bring the needs of the College be- 
fore our people : second, it awakens 
lin ew an interest in the work of edu- 
cating our young people under the 
auspices of our own church. Again, 
it gives the pastor a chance to ad- 
dress the young men and women on 
the importance of a thorough educa- 
tion in these days for efficient work. 
The discussion of these needs, inter- 
ests and advantages will stimulate 
liberality, and has heretofore and we 
are quite sure, will again bring a re- 
spectable contribution from each 
pastoral charge. 

It is no longer a question as to 
whether Lebanon Valley College 
will live. Its perpetuity is no long- 
er in doubt. It now has an endow- 
ment fund of about $50,000, produc- 
tive and non-productive. Within 
the last two years the campus has 
been enlarged, all the buildings 
have been thoroughly renovated and 
improvements added, and the facili- 
ties in several departments have been 
modernized and placed in charge of 
teachers who are specialists. By 
practising a somewhat rigid econ- 
omy the indebtedness has been kept 
down at a standstill instead of a 
yearly increase. 

Now, in view of all these things, 
the agents and friends of the College 
can go before the public and coura- 
geously urge the need of continued 
support. 



29 



Y. M. C. A. Notes. 

The following are the newly 
elected Y. M. C. A. officers who as- 
fumed their duties at the opening of 
JJe spring term : President, G. K. 
tiarttnan ; vice-president, J. H. May- 
jWes; recording secretary, H. W. 
^ a yer; corresponding secretary, 
^arman; treasurer, S. F. Huber. 

iJ a W0rk of fche Y - M - C - A - J ear 
j*«ed with the close of the winter 

m - The results have not been 
be at we could have wished them to 
col, . ttlere has been a very en- 
toanif glllg degree of spiritual interest 
(lev ed - Tu e members have been 
of Sloped and strengthened. Some 
an v members who did not take 
e\L? art ln the meetings at the be- 

active • ^ ear ' now take an 
an f | i f part in the services. More 
; oetter work should be done dur- 

*ork I s year- Wc desire each y ear,s 

one * xc ^ that of the preceding 
of {|j ^ heeding the admonition 
*°rkpot,\ M " C * A ' y ear text, good 
soever t? accomplished. " What- 
with th hand findeth to do, do it 
ate W^/ 13 ^'^ " are ver ^ a PP ro P ri ~ 
r ds to young men who are 



working in the interests of young 
men. 

Messrs. S. F. Huber, J. H. May- 
silles, H. H. Sloat, H. W. Mayer and 
G. K. Hartman attended the dis- 
trict convention at Middletown on 
the 8th and 9th inst. Enthusiasm 
and deep spirituality characterized 
the sessions of the convention. An 
interesting and instructive feature 
of the programme was a Bible read- 
ing by Rev D. M. Stearns, of Ger- 
man town, Pa. He is an earnest 
Christian worker and one of the 
greatest Bible students in the coun- 
try. Besides his regular pastoral 
duties, he conducts 14 Bible classes 
every week, travelling over 500 miles, 
and supports 90 missionaries in for- 
eign fields, through the offerings of 
these classes. He placed special 
stress on the inspired word of God, 
being profitable for all things in 
Christian work. Such plain, prac- 
tical Bible readings cause the hear- 
ers to feel — all the more deeply — 
like Scott that there is but one Book 
—the Bible. 

Our Exchanges. 

Some of our new exchanges are 
The Wasp, Warren O.; The Psi Phi 
Journal, Lafayette, Oregon ; The 
University Star, Bellevue, Neb., and 
High School Gazette, Lynn, Mass. 

The Pharetra is the well-edited 
paper of Wilson College. 

" An Honorable Choice " is a good 
article in the last issue of The Muhl- 
eJiberg. 

The Living Stone, of Salisbury, 
N. C, is one of our regular ex- 
changes. 

After an absence of several months 
The Stylus, of Sioux Falls, S. D., has 
again made its appearance. The 
new dress in which it is issued is a 
decided improvement. 

School Echoes is the neat, new 
monthly of Palatinate College, Myers- 
town, Pa. 

"Was your son graduated at the 
head of his class ?" " No, indeed. 
He was in a more responsible posi- 
tion — at the very foundation of it. — 
Exchange. 

Bread is the staff of life and liquor 
the stilts ; the former sustaining a 
man, and the latter elevating him for 
a fall. — Exchange. 

A year's expenses at Harvard are 
estimated at from $372 to $1,000 ; at 
Princeton, $410 to $645; at Cornell, 
$350 to $500; at Wellesley about 
$350, and at Vassar $400. 

A student cannot do his work and 
attend to all the collaterals that pre- 
sent themselves and that are worthy 
of attention. But he can determine 
just how much time and labor he 
can afford to give to such things, and 
then select those which will be most 
beneficial to him. — The Ossarist. 



A student is asked if he is not 
lonesome when compelled to spend 
hours in solitude. How can he be 
alone, when the very air is fragrant 
with the breath of immortals? When 
the vast treasure-house of the knowl- 
edge of the ages stands open, in- 
viting him 'to enter? A man is 
never so truly alone, so isolated, so 
friendless, as in a crowd.— Ohio 
University Panorama. 



Peril of Associating Only 
Inferiors. 



with 



PHILLIPS BROOKS. 



There is nothing so bad for man 
or woman as to live always with 
their inferiors. It is a truth so im- 
portant that one might well wish to 
turn aside a moment and urge it, 
even in its lower aspects, upon the 
young people who are just making 
their associations and friendships. 
Many a temptation of laziness or 
pride induces us to draw towards 
those who do not know as much or 
are not in some way as strong as we 
are. It is a smaller tax on our 
powers to be in their society. But 
it is bad for us. I am sure that I 
have known men intellectually and 
morally very strong, the whole de- 
velopment of whose intellectual and 
moral life has suffered and been 
dwarfed, because they have only 
companied with their inferiors ; be- 
cause they have not lived with men 
greater than themselves. Whatever 
else they may lose, they surely must 
lose some culture of humility. If I 
could choose a young man's com- 
panions, some should be weaker 
than himself, that he might have the 
full freedom of friendship ; but most 
should be stronger than he, that he 
might forever be thinking humbly 
of himself and be tempted to higher 
things. And this principle, which 
is surely the true one in the associa- 
tion of men with one another, is 
elevated to its perfect application 
when we think of man humbled and 
incited by the constant presence of 
God manifested both as majesty and 
love in Christ. — Selected. 



Selections for College Day. 



LITTLE DEEDS. 



A little spring had lost its way 

Amid the grass and fern ; 
A passing stranger scooped a well, 

Where weary men might turn; 
He walled it in and hung with care 

A ladle to the brink. 
He thought not of the deed he did, 

But judged that toil might drink. 
He passed again, and lo! the well, 

By summers never dried, 
Had cooled ten thousand parching 
tongues, 

And saved a life beside. 



30 



THE COLLEGE FOKUM. 



Virtue and Knowledge. 

Those who advocate that by giv- 
ing children an education the State 
indemnifies itself against criminality 
will find this aspect of the Home- 
stead affair hard to explain. The 
heart must be educated as well as the 
head if we are to make men and 
women better by teaching them to 
read and write. The schools can do 
nothing to keep men out of the jails. 
In the homes of the land, through 
parental training, aided by the kindly 
and gracious teachings of the 
Church, we must look for the in- 
fluences which make of increased 
knowledge a beneficence instead of a 
curse. Who would have ventured 
to conjecture that, as the sequel to 
the Homestead difficulties, four men 
would have been sent to the peni- 
tentiary, convicted of one of the 
most heinous of crimes — wholesale 
poisoning ? 

The advantages of secular educa- 
tion are not to be underrated ; but it 
would be a serious mistake to insist 
upon paying for such education as a 
means of protection against vice or 
crime. To take the money of the 
State upon that plea would be to get 
money on false pretenses. Virtue 
and knowledge do not grow on the 
same tree. They must be cultivated 
separately. — Record. 



Spring Term Opened. 

On Tuesday morning, March 28th, 
at nine o'clock, the regular work of 
the spring term began. The old stu- 
dents were nearly all on hand, and 
about twenty new names were en- 
rolled. It was pleasant to welcome 
old and new, and encouraging re- 
marks were made by the President. 
At this time all the departments are 
in excellent running order, and there 
seems to be a prevailing spirit of 
hard work. The beginning classes 
in Latin and Algebra are numeri- 
cally stronger than usual, which fact 
we regard as a favorable indication 
for college work. 



Good Deed of a College Class. 

The senior class of Bowdoin Col- 
lege, at a class meeting held Monday 
afternoon, did a very philanthropic 
act. Mr. Hinkley, in an address to 
the students on Sunday, urged the 
outgoing classes to raise a fund for 
the purpose of aiding some poor but 
ambitious boy to get a collegiate edu- 
cation. The class of '93, acting upon 
his suggestion, have voted to raise 
the sum of $150 annually for four 
years for this purpose. Some bright 
young boy will be chosen from the 
Good Will Farm, East Fairfield, and 
given the sum of $600 to help him 
through college. — Portland (Me.) 
Argus. 



God Bless the Little Children. 

God bless the little children, 

Wherever they may be — 
Far away in the country, 

Down by the sounding sea — 
Like flowers in the crowded city, 

Like birds in the forest free, 
God bless the little children 

Wherever they may be. 



Mrs. S. D. Faust visited chapel 
services the first of the month. S) le 
states that Mr. Faust is now preach, 
ing in Colorado, and his throat 
trouble is much improved. It j« 
hoped he will be permanently cured 
as his affliction is a great loss to the 
Church. 



Whether they walk in splendid homes, 

With satan-sandalled feet, 
Or wearily run bare-footed 

Adown the busy street ; 
Whether they kneel at eventide 

Beside a mother's knee, 
Or lonely sleep in orphan homes, 

Still tenderly pray we, 
"God bless the little children 

Wherever they may be." 

God bless the little children, 

No matter whose they are! 
The poor man's child may come to be, 

In wit, or wealth, or war, 
Far, far beyond our dreaming, 

For poverty's no bar. 
God bless the little children, 

No matter whose they are! 

God bless the little children, 

For yet we do not see 
What good men, what great men, 

These little ones may be — 
What preachers and what poets, 

What men of noble mind ; 
What true and loving women, 

What wives and mothers kind. 

So tenderly and graciously 

Let little children grow; 
They may be linked with hosts above, 

Or heroes be below; 
For as they sit around our hearts, 

Who can their future see ? 
So may God bless them, every one, 

Wherever they may be! 

— [ Worthingtori 1 s Annual. 



PERSONALS. 



Mrs. Prof. Deaner spent a week in 
Reading, Pa., visiting Dr. George R. 
Shenk. 

Mr. D. G. Kreider has just re- 
covered from a severe attack of 
rheumatism. 

Miss Emma L. Landis, "19, of 
Hummelstown, has been in poor 
health for some time. She is slowly 
con valescing. 

Presiding Elder Dohner, while at 
tending to his official duties, visited 
the College and conducted prayer 
service on the 17th inst. 

Mr. H. B. Roop, '92, is visiting 
the different colleges, soliciting 
young men as canvassers for the 
coming vacation. 

Mrs. Ella Goho and son, of Mil- 
ton, Pa., is visiting her mother, Mrs. 
Mouer. Mrs. Goho was a student 
and interested in the success of the 
College. 

Mrs. Frey, of Bellegrave, Pa., 
while arranging work for her daugh- 
ter said that twenty-five years ago she 
was a student in the College. She 
had not visited the College since she 
left school. 



LITERARY SOCIETIES. 



Philokosinian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



Quite a number of the Philos have 
already decided upon canvassing as 
their employment during the sum- 
mer vacation. Among these are S. 
F. Huber, G. K. Hartman, J. % 
Wallace and J. H. Maysilles, and sev- 
eral others are thinking of engaging 
in the same work. 

G. K. Hartman, S. F. Huber and 
J. H. Maysilles were among the 
delegates to the Harrisburg District 
Convention of the Young Men's 
Christian Association, which was 
held at Middletown, April 1th, 8th 
and 9th. 

On Friday evening, the 14th inst., 
we enjoyed the pleasure of having 
the Clionian Literary Society in our 
midst. A well-prepared programme 
was rendered, which the ladies de- 
clared they highly enjoyed. The 
"Original Story" by Mr. Wallace 
deserves special mention. He kept 
his audience shaking with laughter 
for full fifteen minutes. 

The occasion was a pleasant one 
in every respect. The encouraging 
remarks made by the ladies were 
highly appreciated. We regret that 
such occasions do not occur more 
frequently. To all, and especially 
to the ladies, we would say : " Com e 
to our literary exercises whenever 
you can." 

Messrs. Bomberger, Spankal* 
Leese, Erb, Felix and Byron jj 
Gingrich, Peters and Herr also vis- 
ited us on this occasion. 

Three of these gentlemen, Mess* 
Gringii 



Erb, Felix and Byron 



renin* 



joined the society the same ev 

The election of officers for the J 
suing administration resulted as 
lows: President, W. H. Kreia£ 
Vice-President, I. G. Hoerner ; W 
cording Secretary, W. E. Heij^" 
Corresponding Secretary, J- M 
Meyer; Treasurer, Charles o» e 
ter; Chaplain, 0. E, Good; 



S. F. Huber; Critic, H. 



W- Cri<5 



KATAKEKOMMENA- 



Madame Decca, the Jenny IfJ 
America, gave one of her cbftf* ^ 
istic concerts in 
16th inst. A number of 
and friends attended. 

The Cosmopolitan Magazi^ e J| 
a collegiate year at any lllllV 



i 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



31 



3 ge or school in the United 
SUtes, with tuition, board, lodging 
washing paid, for four hundred 
Annual subscriptions. 

The Frederick County Guide, 
Bid. has entered upon its second 
volume. Its success has been phe- 
nomenal, and it has proven to be 
what its name purported. Cyrus 
Frank Flook is now its editor and 
publisher, Mr. Harp having pur- 
chased an interest in the Frederick 
Examiner. We extend our greet- 
ing to the Guide, and bespeak for it 
ffieater success, knowing the push 
and energy of its present manage- 
ment. 

The average ministerial salary in 
the United States is $700, the maxi- 
mum being $25,000, and the mini- 
mum $60. 

Rev. M. Stine Bovey, a former 
student of the College and a staunch 
friend of L. V. C, has accepted a 
call to the U. B. church at Hagers- 
town, Md. 

President Charles F. Thwing, of 
the Western Reserve University and 
Adelbert College, Cleveland, O., in 
order to direct attention to the value 
of a collegiate education, offers two 
prizes, of $30 and $20 respectively, 
for the two best essays submitted on 
the value of a college education for 
a boy. The essays must be sub- 
mitted by August 1st next. 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Palma non sine Pulvere. 



Owing to a holiday, Good Friday, 
and our anniversary occasion, we 
"ave had no regular session of so- 
c 'ety this term. 

Our number has increased one in 
W»e person of J. G. W. Herold, who 
*>" finish a course of study this 
wm. It does us much good to have 
°ne of larger experience among us. 
Q ^hough it rained nearly all day 

n lM-iday, our anniversary was well 
fended— the chapel being more 
J a »i filled. We were very well 
Jjeased with the audience, and thank 
nc * fiends for their presence. 
ftvAr X " mem k ers w ho were present 
J Mr. H. B. Yohn and Mr. A. S. 
yjers of Mountville; Rev. J. H. 

Cr Kla and Mr - J - °- Molm > of 
f„l I n »- We would not be forget- 

memi kind words of other ex- 

%1 1! Who could not be P 1,esent > 
in 0l c °ntinued interest they show 

th ev T Success as well as the society 
to tni ' ma y ifc he our happy lot 
°th er f • them b y th e hand soon. 
th e i r trien ds who honored us by 
s er M prese nce are Miss Ellen Mus- 
firSf'J ohn D - Stehman and Mr. 

0u r i usser > of Mountville. 
two-f i j r ^ s f° r anniversary were 
^eare r v to P ron ^ an( * entertain our 
8 ! t<^ secure the latter more 



especially, we secured the services 
of the Mendelssohn Quartet of 
Reading, consisting of Miss Annie 
Shearer, Miss Margaret Baltzel, Mr. 
W. J. Baltzel and Mr. Edward Pen- 
gelly ; Mr. William Benbow accom- 
panied them as pianist. We were 
highly pleased with their music, and 
hope we did not fail in our purpose 
of adding to the occasion in the 
minds of our patrons. 

Miss Ditmar, teacher of art, man- 
aged the decorations for us so neatly 
and well as she only can with the 
material to be had. We take this 
public means to express our most 
kindly feelings to our friends in 
Annville for the kindness shown us 
in allowing us to use their furniture 
and flowers, and any other support 
they gave us to make our anniver- 
sary a success. 

The following was the program : 
Music— Oberon-Fantasie Weber-Leybach. 

Messrs. Wm, Benbow and W. J. Baltzel. 
Invocation. 

Music— a. Thou'rt like unto a Flower, 

Rubenstein. 

Music— 6. The Stirrup Cup Arditi. 

Mr. E(i. Pengelly. 
Oration— Patriotism ...Rev. J. G. W. Herold. 
Music— Happy Three Roeckel. 

Mr. W. J. Baltzel. 
Oration— Modern Selfishness.. G. A. L. Kindt. 

Music— Sweet Love for Me Stanford. 

Mendelssohn Quartet. 
Eulogy— James G. Blaine, C. B Pennypacker 

Music— What Shall I do ? Bischoff. 

Miss Annie Shearer. 

Oration— Paternalism H. H. Sloat 

Music— Air de Ballet Chaminade. 

Mr. Wm. Benbow. 
Address— An American in London, 

W. J. Baltzel. 

Music— The Miller's Wooing Fannig. 

Mendelssohn Quartet. 

For fuller account see another col- 
umn. 

The Prohibition Club. 

On the evening of February 28, 
a very enthusiastic address upon the 
subject, " Political Battle Grounds 
of the Near Future," was delivered 
in the College Chapel by Fletcher 
Dobyns, of Oberlin College, Vice- 
President of the National Inter-Col- 
legiate Prohibition Association. The 
speaker mentioned briefly the great 
evils of the liquor traffic, and then 
showed that the cause of the Prohibi- 
tion party now stands a better chance 
of success than ever before. He 
spoke of the two elements which 
have always existed in our politics, 
the progressive and the conservative 
elements ; and said that the result of 
the last election had sounded the 
death-knell of the Republican party, 
which had wasted the golden oppor- 
tunities presented to it, and that the 
Prohibition party would now rise to 
take its place as the representative 
of the progressive elements of the 
American people. His remarks 
were highly appreciated by every 
Prohibitionist present. 

The object of the meeting was to 



organize a Prohibition Club, among 
the students. At the close of his 
address, Mr. Dobyns requested all 
who are interested in the cause of 
Prohibition to remain for a short 
time after the meeting. 

Nearly the entire audience re- 
mained, and Mr. Dobyns at once ex- 
plained the nature of the work to be 
done by the club. 

He advised the holding of monthly 
meetings, and the discussion of the 
various planks of the platform of the 
Prohibition party, by the members of 
the club at these monthly meetings. 

The association which Mr. Dobyns 
represents desires to secure, among 
college students, speakers to 
" stump" the country for Prohibi- 
tion during the summer vacation. In 
order to facilitate this design an 
Oratorical Contest has been agreed 
upon. Each club holds its own local 
contest. The victors in the local 
contests will meet in State contests, 
and the victors in the various State 
contests will meet in a National con- 
test at Chicago. 

After the work of the club was 
outlined an organization was effected, 
and President G. K. Hartman and 
Secretary D. S. Eshleman were 
chosen the same evening. 

A few days afterwards a meeting 
of the club was held, a constitution 
adopted, other officers elected, and 
preparations made for taking part 
in the oratorical contest. The club 
numbers twelve members, and a num- 
ber of others are expected to join. 
All are zealous advocates of the Pro- 
hibition cause, and it may be ex- 
pected that they will use all their in- 
fluence to overthrow the liquor traf- 
fic and to encourage the friends of 
Prohibition. P. 



Woman's Missionary Society. 

The annual meeting of this suc- 
cessful body of workers in the Mas- 
ter's cause was recentlv held in the 
Deny Street U. B. Church, at Har- 
risburg, and from what we gather 
from the reading of its doings in the 
daily papers we infer that the past 
year has been one of the most suc- 
cessful in its history. The treasur- 
er's report showed that the sum of 
$2,023.32 was raised during the year, 
and that but few, if any, of the 
charges in the Conference are now 
without a local societ}^ to assist in 
the work. Annville, as usual, was 
well represented, and our delegates 
took part in the various discussions. 
An interesting paper on how to pro- 
mote the circulation of the Woman's 
Evangel was read by Mrs. President 
Biernian. Mrs. W. O. Herr had 
charge of the music during the day 
sessions. The annual address was 
delivered by Mrs. C. M. Coover, and 
we are told was a very fine produc- 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



tion, did credit to the head and heart 
of its author and won the applause 
of all present. 

The officers for the coming year 
are Mrs. McFarlan, President; Mrs. 
Bierman, Mrs. Spayd and Mrs. Long, 
of Highspire, Vice Presidents ; Mrs. 
Jos. H. Kreider, Treasurer, and Mrs. 
Esther M. Meily, Secretary. 

The next meeting of the Society 
will be held at Annville in April, 
1894. 



LACK OF INDUSTRIAL STABILITY. 

INVENTION DRIVES OUT SKILLED LABOR, 
AND UNSKILLED LABOR IS WITH- 
OUT STATUS. 

"While the political movements of 
the century have changed the personnel 
of domestic servants in America, the de- 
vefopmeut of the materiaf resources, of 
the country has affected their status. 
Before the present century employes of 
every kind were in a sense stationary," 
writes Lucy M. Saimon in the New Eng- 
land Magazine. "This was due partfy to 
a system of indenture which hound a ser- 
vant for seven, five, or four years, and to 
the system of siavery which bound the 
servant for fife; partly to the system of 
apprenticeship which made the servant a 
member of the famify of his master; partfy 
to the custom prevailing in country dis- 
tricts and small towns for unmarried 
workmen in alf industries to board with 
their empioyers, and partfy to the fack of 
facifities for cheap and easy means of 
communication between different sections 
of the country. There was no mobifity 
of fabor as regards either empioyment or 
pface of empfoyment— a fact true afike of 
domestic service and of other occupations. 
But this condition of affairs is changed. 
The estabfishment of the factory system 
of manufactures and the consequent sub- 
stitution of mechanicat for skiiled pro- 
cesses of labor broke down the system of 
apprenticeship, and workmen in every oc- 
cupation, except domestic service, ceased 
to be members of the families of their em- 
pioyers. A greater mobility of fabor was 
made possibie. At a fater time the great 
era of raiiroad devefopment and similar 
enterprises gave opportunity for a certain 
mobility as regards place of employment. 

"Alf of these industriai movements 
have been important factors in changing 
the condition and character of domestic 
service. It is true in a generaf sense that 
every great change in economic condi- 
tions affects aif other occupations, even 
those not primarily concerned in it. But 
domestic service has been affected in cer- 
tain specific ways. The employe who 
disliked housework, but to whom no other 
occupation had been open, coufd go into 
factories and miffs, since no time was con- 
sumed in fearning the simpie processes of 
mechanicaf work. Every invention formed 
the basis for a new occupation. Domestic 
service had a hundred competitions in a 
field where before the era of inventions it 
stood alone. Moreover these new occu- 
pations required littie skiff, no prepara- 
tion. 

"In view of these changed and chang- 
ing economic conditions it may be said 
that that immobility of labor which has 
seemed to some economists so great an 
obstacle to the industriai advancement of 
women practicaily has ceased to exist in 
the case of domestic service. Industrial 
development has been carried so far that 
the probfem has come to be how to make 
this form of fabor not more mobile but 
more stable." 



Ben. Butler was called " The 
Widow," because when he was mak- 
ing his campaign for the Congres- 
sional nomination, he said, on one 
occasion that he was not asking for 
it like a coy maiden, but rather like 
a widow who knew what she wanted, 
and did not hesitate to say so. 




REED'S 
ROSES 



AND SEED never fail 

to give satisfaction to all wh« 
follow his cultural directions, 
which are sent with every order. 
Here is an offer: Best trial 
pkg. of Roses in America— 16 Hue plain s.ull differ- 
ent, good kinds, strong growers, splendid roots, all for 
JSI.OO. 7for50c. Sample Rose or 3 pkts. flower seed 
with catalogue for 10c. Order at once. Mention paper 
WM» li. KJbClSD Florist, Cuanibersburg, Pa. 



ESTABLISHED 1865. 



Standard and Reliable 
Clothing at Reasona- 
ble Prices. All Our 
Own Make. Spring 
and Summer Stock 
Now Ready. 



LEINBACH & BED.. 



Cor. 8th and Penn Sts., 



READING, PA. 



A SPECIAL DISCOUNT 
TO STUDENTS AND CLERGYMEN. 



IF you wish to advertise anything anywhere at any 
time, write to GEO. P. ROWELL & Co., No. 10 
Spruce Street, New York. 



EVERY one in need if information on the subject 
of advertising will do well to obtain a copy of 
"Book for Advertisers, " 308 pages, prioc one dollar. 
Mailed, postage paid, on receipt of price. Contains a 
careful compilation from the American Newspaper 
Directory of all the best papers and class journals ; 
gives the circulation rating of every one, and a good 
deal of information about rates and other matters 
pertaining to the business of advertising. Address 
KOWELL'S ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce 
Street, New York. 



QUMJJEKLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 

time table-Dec. is, 1892. 



Down Trains 



Lv. Winchester 
" Martin- b'g 
" Hagersto'n 
" Greencas'e 
" Cl'amb'g.... 
" Shippens'g 
" Newvile... 

" Carlisle 

" Mechau'bg 

Ar. Dillsburg... 
" Harrisbu'g 



Philad'a.... 
New York. 
Baltimore . 



C'bg 
Acc. 



6 15 
6 35 

6 55 

7 20 
7 44 



I 05 



Ky'e 
Exp 



No. 2 



A. M. 

6 20 

7 03 

7 42 

8 06 
8 30 

8 52 
912 

9 35 
10 00 



10 20 

125 
4 00 
1 25 
P. M. 



Mr'g 
Mail 



Day 
Exp 



Kv' ; 



A. M. P. M. 



10 25 

1 25 
4 00 
1 25 

P. M. 



11 45 

12 09 
12 32 
12 53 

1 10 
1 35 
12 55 
4 43 
218 

6 50 
9 35 
6 45 
P. M. 



No. 8 


Now 


P. M. 


P. M 


2 20 


500 


310 


710 


400 


10105 


426 


1025 


5 06 


10* 


5 20 


1107 


5 41 


1127 


607 


li r, 


6 34 


1201 


7 05 




715 


1220 




A.M. 


10 55 


425 


3 50 


710 


10 40 


t ■» 


P. M. 


AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily exa 
Sunday at 5:55 a. m., 12:30 p. m., 3:45 p. m. Stoppingat 
all intermediate stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 
6:40 a. m., 1:15 p. m., 4:33 p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg i 
Chambersburg. 



Up Trains. 


Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


C'bg 


N.0. 


Acc. 


Exp 


Acc. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp 




No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 


No. 7 


No.19 


No. 9 




P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


Lv. Baltimore.. 


11 30 


4 45 


8 53 


11 20 


4 25 


425 


" New York 


8 00 


12 15 




9 00 


200 


5 OS 


" Philad'a 


1120 


4 30 


8 50 


11 40 


435 


746 




A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. SI. 


" Harrisb'g... 


612 


7 55 


12 30 


3 45 


8 00 


10 25 






715 


12 10 




810 




" Mechmi'bg 


627 


811 


12 51 


4 06 


820 


1041 


" Carlisle 


6 57 


8 31 


1 15 


4 30 


8 44 


1051 


" Newvilie.... 


7 21 


8 53 


1 42 


4 55 


9 08 


11 11 


" Shippens'g 


7 40 


9 15 


2 02 


5 16 


929 


ii a 


" Chamb'g.... 


8 03 


9 40 


2 30 


5 42 


950 


112! 


" Greencas'e.. 


8 24 


10 10 


2 52 


6 03 




ll 47 


" Hagerst'n... 


8 55 


10 20 


3 15 


6 30 




121) 


" Martinsb'g 
Ar. Winchester 


9 40 






712 






10 30 






800 






A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. Mi 



Additional trains will leave narrisburg daily exa 
Sunday at 8:25 a. m., 10:35 a. m.. 5:15 p. m.,ari 
at Carlisle at 9:10 a. m., 11:20 a. m., 6:00 p. m„ 
ping at all intermediate stations ; on Saturday 
tional train will leave Harrisburg at 6:20 p. m., 
ng at Mechanicsburg 6:41 p. m., stopping at : 
ermediate stations. 

Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hagerstoff 
and New York on Keystone Express and Night I" 
press east, and on Memphis Express and New Orla 
Express west. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and Nt* 
Orleans Express between Philadelphia and N>-w Or- 
leans. 




For 1893 we have combined a most novel and charming feature in the way of hun- 
dreds of beautiful and appropriate poetical quotations from the best authors, making 
The Poets' Number Of Vick'S Floral Guide a source of interest and pleasure 
the whole year. The practical part contains Colored Plates of Alpine Aster, 
Begonia, Dahlias, Dutchman's Pipe, Clematis, Pansies, Cannas, Corn and 
Potatoes, hundreds of Engravings ; descriptions of the sweetest and most prolific 
Pea— The Charmer, The Golden Nugget Corn, which was such a favorite last 
summer, new Roses, new Chrysanthemums, and scores of other grand and good 



eta 



— Buuuucij new nuaes, new unr vsaiiiueinuiiia, yi umti k'' uiu e> JbSj 

things. Names and prices of everything one could desire in way of Flowers, Vegetables, Plants, j^J. 
Sent for only 10 cents, which can be deducted from the first order, thus it costs nothing. C8S r ( 

JAMES VICK'S SONS, Rochester, N. * 



Volume VI. 



Number 5. 



THE 



College Forum. 



MAY, 1893. 



• -f CONTENTS: •*• . 



_ i'AUJO 

Editorials .12 

The American Student in the Nation's His- 

tor y 2-8 

Our Inheritance 8 9 

Oratorical Contest 9, 10 

Won a Prize 10 

Alumni Reunion 10 

Kalozetean Literary Society 10 

Philokosmian Literary Society 10, 11 



Philokosmian Anniversary 11, 12 

Board of Education 12 

Commencement "Week 12 

Athletics 12, 13 

Earn It 13 

Our Exchanges 13 

Christians on Sunday Trains 13, 14 

Book Note 14 

Advertisements , 14-16 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



MOOR'S CAFE, 115 AND 117 NORTH NINTH STREET, LEBANON, Pa. 



HARRY LIGHT, 

BOOKS AND STATIONERY, 

22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



m 
o 

< 
x 
o 
X 
m 

n 
< 

w 

CO 

CP 
W 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
/Vetv, Second- Hand and Shelf-Worn 



I 

Together with a Complete Assortmt nt of 

STATIONERY, 

Wall Paper and Window Shades. 

A Selected Stock of the 

LATEST STYLES OF WALL PAPER 

AND 

DECORATIONS. 



SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 



C- SMITH, 

m kl BQQ2 Sf 0; 

ANNVILLE, PA, 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

COLLEGE AND SGHOOL SUPPLIES, 

INCLUDING 
NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 
OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place in the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. 4®- New and Old Books Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

SILVER PLATED WARE, 

Spectacles a Specialty, Fitted ^l^st Gold ' 

PERFECT FOCUS AND FIT GUARANTEED. 

ISAAC WOLF, 

LEBANON'S LEADING CLOTHIER. 

ONE PRICE ONLY . 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

828 CTJIMLBERXj-AJSTI} STREET. 



ON MABKET ST., AT THE RIVER BRIDGE, 

HABRISBURG-, IP A.. 

CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, ETC. 




Always sold at the Lowest Cash Prices. AH Goods 
Guaranteed to he as represe ted. Rag and Ingrain 
Carpets 25 cents per yard up. Floor and Table Oil 
Cloths 25 cents per yard up. 

F RED. W. YINGST, on Market St., at the Bridge. 



When you need Books or Stationery of any kliul 
correspond with or call on us. By so doing you will 
secure the Best Goods at the most Favorable Prices. 

Stock always New and Fresh. Assortment Large. 
Prices the Lowest. Whether you intend to buy 25c. 
or $25.00 worth, it will pay you to caU to see us. 

Bagster's and Oxford Teachers' Bibles a Specialty; 
We carry in stnck the publications of the U. B 
Publishing House, such as Otterbein Hymnals, 
Hymns of the Sanctuary, the Books used in the 
three years' course of study, S. S. Music Books. 

AGENTS WANTED to sell the best and most 
popular Lord's Prayer published. Send 75 cents fur 
sample copy, worth $2.00. Address plainly 

CKIDER & BROTHER, 

PUBLISHERS OF 



Photograph MarriageCertiflca 

Photograph Family Records, Etc, Etc, 



YORK, PA. 



PLEASE MENTION tt THE COLLEGE FOJtUM." 



Roses, Carnations and Cut 
Specialty. 



Flovfe rS 



B. P. WYNINGS, Florist, 

Successor to Wynings & Dace, 121 North 9th St., Lebanon, Pa. Bulbs and Hardy Plants m v"* 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. VI. No. 5. 



ANNVILLE, PA., MAY, 1893. 



"Whole No. 61. 



EDITORS. 



EDITOR IN CHIEF. 

H. Clay Deaner.A. M., 

Professor of Latin and Astronomy. 

FACULTY. 

E. Benj. Bierman, A. M., Ph. D., President. 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
John E. Lehman, A. M., Professor of Mathematics. 
Rev. Jno. A. McDermad, A. M.» Professor of Greek. 
John A. Shott, Ph. B. B., Ped., 

Professor of Natural Science. 
Mabt E. Sleichter, A. B., 

Professor of English and Modern Languages. 
Carrie M. Flint, Professor of Piano and Voice. 
Alice K. Gingrich, M. A., Professor of Harmony. 
Emma A. Dittmar, Teacher of the Fine Arts. 



SOCIETY EDITORS. 
Clionian Society— Miss Maggie Strickxer, '94. 
Philokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— C. B. Pennyp acker, '96. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 
Horace W. Crider, '93. D. S. Eshelman, '94. 

William H. Kreider, '94. 



PUBLISHING AGENT. 
H. Clay Deaner. 




AH communications or items of news should be sent to 
tie Editor in Chief. Subscriptions should be sent to the 
Publishing Agent. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-flre cents. Subscriptions 
received at any time. 

for terms of advertising, address the Publishing Agent. 

JL n ^ re , d at the Post O ffl ee at Annville, Pa., as 
ggond-cl ass mall matter . 

Editorial. 



The College Forum, enlarged to a six- 
teen page monthly, makes its introductory 
w in a new dress. It awaits the verdict 
lts many friends, feeling assured that 
present form will receive a hearty 
feting and approval. The editors, in 
* Ver y way possible, will make The Col- 
^ Forum worthy of Lebanon Val- 
*J College, and of the support of its 
ends. Being devoted to the interests 
. e ^ Ucati on in general, and Lebanon Yal- 
* °Uege in particular, it hopes to give a 



crisp and newsy publication, laden with 
good things for all. Your hearty coope- 
ration is needed. Send us your subscrip- 
tion, and we will know that } r our interest 
is genuine. 



Excursion orders to attend the Com- 
mencement exercises can be had over the 
Cumberland Valley, and Philadelphia and 
Reading railroads, by addressing the 
President of the College. 



The Bible Normal Union graduation 
services will be held, as usual, on Sunday 
afternoon of Commencement Week. In- 
stead of having an address to the class, as 
in former years, there will be short ad- 
dresses by each member of the class. A 
specially interesting programme has been 
prepared. 

Rev. S. D. Faust, '89, has been elected 
to the chair of Church History, in the U. 
B. Seminary, at Daj^ton, Ohio. The se- 
lection of Rev. Faust was a wise one, and 
has the hearty approval of the East. His 
ability is recognized both within and 
without the church. He is a tried and 
successful teacher, being devoted to the 
church, full of enthusiasm, progressive, 
scholarly and pious, one most fitted could 
not have been selected. 



Next month the Class of '93 completes 
their first lesson, and they will take their 
places in the bus}' marts of the world. 
They will return to L. V. C, but not as 
students. We trust you will make the 
world richer and better, and be an honor 
to yourselves and to your Alma Mater. 



2 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Others will take their places, but still 
their willing hands which for four years 
have ever been untiring will be missed. 
Your future is bright. When sundown 
comes, may you all have garnered many 
sheaves of golden grain, is the wish of the 
College Forum. 



We send a number of complimentary 
copies to our friends and the Alumni, 
with the hope of getting them more inter- 
ested in the College. The College needs 
your aid, sympathy and support. The 
students of the College are strongly 
wedded to her interests and success. 
Everything you do, be it a dollar from 
the caverns of your trousers' pockets, a 
subscription to the College Forum, or a 
good word for L. V. C, will receive a 
hearty amen from all. 



Commencement usually greets many an 
Alumnus, but why not visit your Alma 
Mater more frequently ? We recall your 
great enthusiasm in college days, and we 
long to see some of that same ardor man- 
ifested during every day in the year. If 
each alumnus would send a student, how 
L. Y. C. would rejoice. It could be done. 
No one could do it better. Dear " sisters 
and brethren," we expect large things 
from your hands now. If not from you, 
from whom can we ? 



The first commencement exercises of 
the schools of North and South Annville 
were held in the Town Hall, on the even- 
ing of May 4th inst. Mr. Aclam R. Forney 
presided. Dr. J. E. Hiester, of the Re- 
formed church, led in invocation. The 
programme consisted of essays, recita- 
tions and orations. There were sixteen 
ladies and gentlemen in the class. The class 
did themselves much credit. The music 
was furnished by members from the choirs 
of the churches of town, led by Professor 
Lehman, and accompanied by Miss Lizzie 
Hiester on the piano, which was of a high 



order and universally commended. Dr 
E. 0. Lyte, principal of Millersville State 
Normal School, gave the closing address 
on " Education out of School." 



The American Student in the Nation's 
History. 



PROP. A. H. GERBERICH, B. S. 



During our recent war with Mexico, 
when the clash of resounding arms was 
heard in the very heart of the country, 
when the advancing wave of battle swept 
over the plateau of Anuhac, and the har- 
ness of the conquerors waved in sight of 
the proud city of the Montezumas, when 
the veteran armies of Mexico had heen 
defeated in scores of encounters, when 
Contreras had been stormed, when Churu- 
busco had been captured and San Antonia 
had been taken by assault, and when the 
fortifications of Molino del Rey could not 
resist the impetuous wave of conquest, 
the fortunes of a sinking nation centered 
around the fortress of Chapultapec. That 
fortress, crowning the summit of the 
highest elevation about that famous city, 
was especially dear to every Mexican. 
Every square foot of its slopes was radi- 
ant with the country's history. Here the 
ancient Kings had been found, and here 
centered the glories of the modern repub- 
lic. 

The garrison of this fortress was not 
only composed of the veteran troops of 
the Mexican army, for they had entered 
battle only to meet defeat, but its most 
important bulwarks were guarded by the 
students of Mexico. They were youths 
upon whose lips the scanty beard could 
scarcely be seen. They were the pride of 
Mexican homes; they were the beloved of 
Mexican mothers. Throughout that des- 
perate battle those boys fought with » 
determination that deserved a better fate 
Charge after charge had broken their 
ranks; hurled backward by the tide o 
battle, they rallied and stubbornly resisted, 
and when dispair finally settled on tfl^ 



nation, and when the troops from 



quarters were in full retreat towar 



d the 



cities gates, those Mexican studen > 
still struggled to uphold a lost cause, 
until the fragments of their broken ra»g 
wree hurled down the summit, and 
tremendous cheers from the Nort u 
ranks not only resounded the accla 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



3 



! 



n 
n 

u- 

ia 
ae 
ot 
rt, 
ed 
iat 
he 

ty, 

IB. 

di- 

the 
ere 
ub- 

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, of 
Ted 

lOSt 

the 
iths 
>uld 
e of 
dot 
des- 
th a 
fate, 
their 
e of 
sted, 
the 
j all 
I the 
lent 5 

rank 5 
d the 
thei' 11 
Ian* 



tions of victory, but applauded the valor 
of those students who had won their ad- 
miration for bravery and respect for their 
determination. How often, in the history 
of our own country, during times of 
greatest despondency, when the clouds of 
uncertainty and despair, being dark on 
our national horizon, and storms oc- 
casioned by failings of ancestors or our 
own peaple threatened destruction and 
when all means seemed to fail, the Ameri- 
can student entered the field of duty, and 
by his far reaching statesmanship and 
wise arrangement of the nation's forces, 
strengthened the nation's power, braved 
the hurricanes blast, and although the 
land was at times drenched by the 
country's best blood, still the nation en- 
dures strong in its early manhood, and 
hopeful in its future attainments. In our 
nation, whose acievements are recorded 
on the pages of the world's history, have 
the students of a people more largely 
wrought out the fabric of national power, 
and in no nation has that national de- 
velopment been so successfully achieved. 
We have not been compelled to pass 
through periods of strife to satisfy the 
ambition of dangerous leaders. We have 
not been taught the severe lesson of civil 
.strife occasioned by religious bigotry, 
and we have not passed through those 
dangerous periods of experimental govern- 
ment by unwise legislation, but our very 
conflicts, even those in which the nation 
shed its blood so freely were for the 
country's advancement to higher attain- 
ments, and were the result of grand striv- 
ings for the accomplishment of worthy 
attainments. 

We have been especially favored above 
other nations, and only because America's 
students controlled the affairs of state 
[•wing the periods of greatest trial and 
the forces of our nation to successful 
Victory. Our Pilgrim Fathers landed on 
seeming inhospitable shores. Their re- 

?l? n . was S iven h y the st <> rm es of win- 
r > their welcome chant was the mournful 
° n g of the surges. Untold difficulties 

eS Ve - nted their development. The re- 
timing of a wilderness demanded their 
arc/* 168 ' -^ e ^ ence against warlike savages 
f _ used their military ardor. Conditions 
^ Intellectual development could not 

earn 8 been more dimcult 5 hnt that 
sun 6 - t r . eli g ious zeal combined with that 
andv" i ntelli gence derived from political 
rell gious controversy for more than a 



century, would not permit intellectual 
advancements to be seriously checked by 
the trials of a new life in an untrodden 
wilderness. The fireside became the pub- 
lic school, the rector's house became the 
academy, and the college arose ere the 
primeval forest was largely disturbed, and 
while Indian boys still sported on the 
commons. The institutions of those early 
days, when traits of character were so 
largely stamped upon the national life, 
claim special attention. They were, 
themselves, the finest students of England. 
They were largely the graduates of her 
best institutions. Many of them wore 
the colors of Oxford, and had enjoyed the 
intellectual opportunities of Cambridge. 
They were men who possessed a strong 
individuality and men willing to assist 
that individuality under the most trying 
circumstances. 

Their education was the most liberal, 
and they combined with that education 
the determination to work out their liberal 
views in practical life. They were driven 
from Europe because they would not fol- 
low in the exact paths which were mapped 
out by those in authority — paths which 
were founded on policy and paved in re- 
ligious intolerance. To them America pre- 
sented its boundless opportunities, and 
here their influence was felt, as was im- 
possible under different circumstances. 
Their pupils were especially adapted to 
receive their instruction. They were sur- 
rounded by influences which caused the 
very air to waft the breathings of liberty. 
For their God's sunshine illuminated the 
valleys and reflected its radiance from the 
hillsides. For this His copious showers 
fertilized the cultivated fields, and watered 
the forests. They recognized nature's dif- 
ferent forms, and bowed to her varied 
teachings. To nature's teachings was 
added deep religious convictions. Beyond 
the beauty of nature they recognized the 
sublimity of nature's God. That deep re- 
ligion was the great source of his strength. 
It permitted him to lay the basis of a 
strong national existence. 

It furnished a power which was recog- 
nized on scores of battlefields. A power 
which has been recognized in the ages of 
the past and which has led to the grand- 
est achievements of the world's history. 
It was that power which enabled the 
levies of the Prince of Orange to resist 
the veterans of Philip II. It was that 
power which urged the famous charge of 



4 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



the Huguenots at Ivre. It was that 
power which made the advance of the 
Swedes irresistible on the field of Lutzen, 
it was by that same power that Crom- 
well's Ironsides swept the imperial forces 
from the field of Naseby, and without 
that power the American student would 
have largely failed in working out the 
nation's destiny. Those deep religious 
convictions, and the influence of the early 
teachers prepared the American student 
for his task. 

He guarded the affairs of the different 
communities with a jealous eye, and was 
restless under any 7 government which 
even suggested the withdrawal of colonial 
liberties. Seeing the benefits of extended 
domain the settlements were pushed into 
the deepest wilderness, and all energies 
were directed to the advancement of the 
national progress. 

The different religious creeds were modi- 
fied and the force of religious bigotry was 
checked in its career. Slowly but never- 
theless earnestly the development was ac- 
complished, until, by the time the ener- 
gies of New England were needed for the 
development of the other colonies, the 
union of the New England States was ac- 
complished, and the nucleus for a great 
Nation was formed. 

The development of succeeding events 
produced a marked change on the colonial 
history. The different French wars were 
heartily entered upon by the American 
colonies. Those wars were not urged by 
any hatred for France, for that National 
hatred did not exist; but this ardent 
zeal on the part of the colonies was en- 
tirely due to the far-seeing policy of the 
New England statesmen, who already pic- 
tured extensive domains, containing its 
marts of commerce, in the region of the 
Ohio and the valley of the St. Lawrence. 
Even before the opening of King Will- 
iam's War the project of National union 
was already advanced. The task was, 
however, most difficult. The population 
of the colonies was of a cosmopolitan na- 
ture and embraced the descendants of the 
most powerful nations of Europe. More- 
over they represented different political 
ideas and held different religious convic- 
tions. Ideas and convictions which were 
most earnestly upheld, and which were 
cemented by the blood of the battlefields 
of Europe. To accomplish the union of 
those different nationalties and varied 
conviction it required the sundering of na- 



tural ties, the setting aside of principles 
still ardently upheld, and even of partially 
forgetting the glories acquired on the 
contested battlefields of Europe. It re- 
quired almost five centuries to properly 
lay the foundation of ancient Rome. 

It required seven to establish on a 
national basis the power of France, while 
less than two centuries were necessary to 
place America in the front rank of the 
nations of the world. This marked 
achievement is an enduring monument to 
the genius of the American student. 
Earnestly and zealously the developing of 
a nation from those cosmopolitan frag, 
ments was begun. The pulpit, the press 
and the town meeting afforded the nec- 
essary opportunity. The union of the 
New England colonies was the model after 
which the final union was copied and 
formed a strong nucleus around which 
the varied interests centered. The de- 
mands of war aroused anew the activities 
of the people; it directed, it is true, their 
energies in a slightly 7 different channel, but 
the prime object of union was never for- 
gotton. One contest darkened the horizon 
and scattered its tinge of sadness on every 
side. Another followed and left its bleed- 
ing wounds. One more, and the same 
scenes were enacted ; but it neither advan- 
ced nor retarded the accomplishment of 
the grand purpose. The fourth conflict 
opened, but with entirely different results. 
It was the measure of strength between 
absolute monarchy, as represeeted in the 
waning strength of the Bourbons of 
France, and the aggressive power of the 
constitutional principles of England. 
Not only did England arouse all her ener- 
gies for the contest, but America's re- 
sources were drained to their utmost to 
support an ungrateful mother. The great 
demands of the colonies urged a comrn 011 
union, and every effort for that union m® 
with the common sympathies of the people- 
The descendants of the Cavaliers and 
Roundheads forgot their mutual differ- 
ences, and religious bigotry was mello^ 
into the greatest liberality. The dflJJjM 
of Massachusetts timed the march of * lie 
battalions of Virginia. The sturdy in** 
try of New York, marking this system » 
the Dutch evolutions, won the admiratP 
of the most impetuous New England^ 
The influence of the colonial oftce* 
aroused a generous rivalry between 
different colonies, but all united agav» 
the aggressive actions of foreign su 




THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



on a 
while 
ry to 
f the 
irked 
nt to 
iclent. 
ngof 

frag- 
press 
i nec- 
»f the 
I after 
[ and 
which 
le de- 
ivities 
, their 
el, but 
er for- 
orizon 
1 every 
, bleed- 
s same 
advan- 
lent of 
conflict 
results, 
•etween 

in the 
ions of 
: of the 
ngland. 
er ener- 
ca's re- 
most to 

le gi" eat 
common 

ion met 
j people- 
iers and 
1 differ- 
lellovved 
e drum 5 
,h of <** 
ly inf fln ; 
vstem o 1 
miration 
blander- 
"office^ 
veen & 
I againf 



tern s. The shock of battle shed its influ- 
ence from Maine to Georgia. With it 
game the mingled wailings of despair and 
the shout of trumpets. A voice of sad- 
ness arose from the wilds of Ft. DuQuesne 
an <J its volume was increased from the 
Intrenchments of Ticonderoga and the 
region of Lake George. But amid the 
shouts of triumph, amid the cry of an- 
guish, the wondrous transformation still 
continued. Powers unseen shifted the 
affairs of a people until the cross of St. 
George was unfurled upon the battlements 
of Quebec, amid the plaudits of two na- 
tions, and heralded not only England's 
final triumph over the Bourbons of France, 
but also the union of colonial ties from 
the wilds of the Kennebec to the wilderness 
of the Roanoke. 

Peace followed, but it did not lessen the 
energies for national union. Peace does 
not usually produce a lull in a nation's 
activity, when strong forces are framing 
a nation. Those forces, when properly 
controlled, direct the energies aroused by 
war, and although their effect is not so 
easily seen during times of peace, still in 
a quiet manner those forces are quietly 
gaining strength and concentrating their 
energies, and await favorable opportuni- 
ties. The forces which united America 
by the Declaration of Independence, did 
not accumulate their strength after the 
hostilities of the Revolution opened. 
They were nourished and developed dur- 
ing the period of peace which preceded. 
The statesmanship of a Franklin, the mili- 
tary science of a Washington, the elo- 
quence of a Patrick Henry and the logic 
of a J onathan Edwards "were preparing 
those for the grand opportunity. In- 
justice lent her hand to hasten the cul- 
mination of those forces. It conentrated 
the powers, and directed them to concen- 
trated resistance. That resistance was 
°ot rash as would have been the result 
Uaf l it been controlled by ambitious 
leaders. The resistance to the colonial 
Policy of England was the result of 
Ratine judgment, self-sacrificing princi- 
ples, and an earnest attachment to those 
jjjernal laws of human welfare. The pro- 
oters of this resistance composed the 
pae n ° ted galax y found on history's 

They were men who embodied in their 
Cp°js, the full intellectual development 
gen was . founded on their dili- 
Ce - Their education was not however 



of that inhuman form embracing the 
stoical school of Seneca. Nor yet of that 
mistaken form of the skeptical school of 
France. But an education supported by 
deep religious conviction and strength- 
ened by earnest religious zeal. He who 
would wish to remove the influence of re- 
ligion from the history of his country, 
will have no country left. The concen- 
trated resistance of the colonies, ably 
controlled and carefully had staked its 
fortune on the sword and appealed to the 
God of Battle. 

It is useless to follow the details of 
the Revolutionary struggle. They, our 
fathers, warred against a preamble. They 
fought seven years against a declaration. 
They poured out their blood and treasure 
like water, but in every successive step of 
the war's advancement the energies of the 
Nation were controlled by her most earn- 
est students. The college president be- 
came the legislator, numbers of college 
alumnis became the statesmen, and the 
college students became the officers of the 
army. That one great document of the 
Revolution, the Declaration of Independ- 
ence, is destined to live when all the litera- 
ture of the past is forgotten. If the time 
ever shall come when the deeds of mili- 
tary glory shall be regarded as remnants 
of the barbarian traits of the past, when 
the monuments erected to our fallen 
heroes shall be crumbled in the dust, and 
when the very names which grace our 
military annals shall be consigned to 
oblivion, that document, the Declaration 
of Independence, will still be preserved, 
strong in its eternal youth, pure as the 
principles upon which it is based, and 
glorious as has been the history of the 
Nation that accepted its teachings. The 
greatest achievement of the American stu- 
dent was not, however, the Declaration of 
Independence, nor yet the successful con- 
clusion of the war. It was achieved when 
the din of battle had ceased, and when the 
foreign armies had departed from our 
shores. But it was when the public credit 
was ruined, when confidence in the future 
of the youthful Nation was destroyed, 
when neighbor began to distrust his 
neighbor, when the National ties possessed 
no power, and when the entire fabric of 
government tottered upon its foundation 
as an unwieldy edifice constructed before 
itsproper time, and was ready to crumble 
into anarchy and confusion, or be the 
prey of some ambitious despot. . 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Then the American student began his 
stupendous task. Brushing away the 
surface rubbish until the foundation 
rested upon the hearts of the American 
people, laboring for months to lay that 
foundation broad and firm, engaging in 
the most heated contests in the selection 
of its material, making advances and 
accepting compromises to satisfy the 
varied interests of the countiy, and upon 
that foundation when it was finally com- 
pleted the fabric of statistics was firmly 
placed. That fabric has been swept by 
storms of opposition. The waves of 
fury have attempted its destruction, and 
the hurricane's wrath has swept it with its 
accumulated power. The storms have 
spent their force in vain, the waves have 
clashed to no purpose, and the hurricane's 
fury has been of no avail. That structure, 
our national fabric, is established upon a 
foundation of adamant, a foundation 
cemented by the heart's blood of a people 
and as ending almost as time itself — the 
constitution of the United States 

A nation never developes her power by 
military conquests, nor by the aggrandize- 
ment of alien territory, but only by 
strengthening the patriotism of her own 
people. In the binding closer of national 
ties, in perfecting a government which is 
the pride of her people, and in fostering 
those principles of reform which advance 
humanity, and which have been the glory 
of the Republic. No greater triumph of 
statesmanship exists on histoiy's pages 
than that great moral reform which de- 
stroyed forever that inhuman traffic of 
human blood. Athens, with his poetry, 
music, oratory and art was destroyed be- 
cause four-fifths of her inhabitants were 
slaves. Rome, with her military power, 
her martial fame and her laws, was over- 
thrown in the question of slavery, and in 
no country where that damnable institu- 
tion was finall}- planted was it ever re- 
moved by the nation whose institutions 
fostered its growth and whose laws per- 
mitted its development. 

America, alone, succeeded after a most 
determined contest in wiping out, not only 
the very foundation of this evil, but even 
in healing the deepest wounds that insti- 
tution left in its wake, and in causing the 
shouts of praise to ascend from the North 
and South alike at the nation's deliverance. 
In recording the accomplishments of this 
great achievement, history places another 
crown of laurels on the temple of the 



American student. The result of two 
schools, both containing America's most 
earnest students. The one was radical and 
aggressive, exposing the failures of a peo- 
pie and testing the government of the na- 
tion before the tribunal of Eternal Justice. 

The other was conservative, compromis- 
ing, covering a nation's faults, hiding her 
failures, conciliating the extremes in nat- 
ional affairs and postponing the solution 
of the contest at stake to another genera- 
tion. The one was founded on the princi- 
ple that a nation can only be saved hy the 
removal of evil, and to remove that evil 
were willing to enter into a contest in which 
the nation's very existence trembled in the 
balance. The other believed that evil 
will always exist in nations ; that while 
evil should be removed, it is a serious mis- 
take to risk a nation's very existence for 
the removal of that evil. Those two 
schools continually opposed each other in 
the public arena, and yet strangely enough 
had nothing foreign to each other, but 
both were, striving to accomplish the same 
result through different channels. 

Both had its leaders. Great national 
lights they were, whose brilliancy will 
radiate throughout all ages. One was 
largely led by the eloquent Wendell 
Philips, the logical William Lloycl Garri- 
son, and the sublime John Gr. Whittier. 
The other was most largely influenced by 
the oratory of Daniel Webster and the 
political sagacity of Heniy Clay. The 
one was taxing all its energies to prepare 
the country for the final struggle, the 
other exhausting all its resources to con- 
tinue at peace until the forces for right 
and justice could be properly concentrated. 
The conservative school passed the diffi- 
culties [of the Missouri agitation; pre- 
served peace b}^ the Compromise of 1850, 
and rather than hazzard civil war adhered 
to the Kansas and Nebraska Bill. Their 
have been few persons more unjustly ac- 
cused than have been the bodies of that 
conservative school. They are accused 
even at the present time of sacrificing the 
interest of the country to the interest of 
party, and of fostering an arch-enemy ot 
mankind in our very midst. The criti- 
cism is however unjust. 

Their conservative policy saved tn 
country from dismembevment. Had t 
war occurred during the period of t 
Missouri Compromise it would have w| 
membered the country. Had it ocCl " r< L 
in 1850 the opponents of slavery could n 




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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



two 
nost 
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peo- 
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Jtice, 
nnis- 
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i nat- 
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. The 
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to con- 
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ie diffi- 
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have mustered sufficient strength to de- 
stroy its power. But every year of peace 
was building up a strong abolition party 
in the entire North, and the Northwest was 
rapidly developing, and from that develop- 
ment was issuing a power decidedly op- 
posed to the institution of slavery. 
Throughout those years of peace, the 
aggressive school had effected a marked 
change in the opinions of the people. It 
had compelled the leading Christian 
churches to take a strong position against 
slavery, and had caused a religious division 
to be made of the country. 

By their strong appeals the forces of 
opposition were marshalled from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific. The combatants 
for and against this giant evil laid aside 
the pen and grasped the sword. The 
gladiators of the political arena sought 
the field of battle. The two schools 
united for the advancement of political 
freedom and the rights of humanity and 
their well marshalled forces met those of 
class distinction and human degradation, 
on the field of battle. The mutterings 
of the desperate combat were wafted from 
the banks of the Rappahannock and the 
wilds of Missouri. The roar of battle 
swept back and forth like the surges of 
the sea over the blue grass hills of Ken- 
tucky and Tennessee and the swamps of 
Virginia. 

Its wave of advancing terror rolled 
back upon the North. The forces for 
human rights concentrated their powers 
for a final desperate struggle. A fiendish 
yell of triumph startled the nations of the 
earth, the stars and bars were planted 
on Cemetery Hill. There but a moment, 
and they were buried in the dust, and 
over them waved the silken folds of the 
stars and stripes, and that shout 
of triumph, the outburst of a generous 
nation's heart, rolled in one continuous 
volume from the Atlantic to the Pacific. 
*he nations of the world caught up the 
chorus, hundreds of millions of the lovers 
°t humanity swelled its glorious strains 
Un til they reverberated and re-reverber- 
ated throughout the entire world, and 
Proclaimed in unmistaken terms that free- 
om had triumphed over oppression, and 
s ice had crushed aggravated crime, 
badies and gentlemen, through the ages 
, °ur past history, the American student 
e J s c °ntrolled an ddirected the important 
ents of the nation's history in the 
'sive stages of the nation's develop- 



ment until the present time, and 
has won the applause of a genererous 
people. In times of greatest clanger 
his powerful statesmanship was most felt, 
during periods of deepest gloom he led 
the way to the brightness of future suc- 
cess. During the periods of rest aud 
prosperity he has perhaps not figured so 
prominently in the national arena, but 
during those times he has originated those 
reforms which have elevated the nation to 
higher and nobler attainments. The 
overthrow of Polygamy and the destruc- 
tion of that infamous gambling institution, 
" The Louisiana Lottery," are his latest 
triumphs. Students of Lebanon Yalley 
College, to-day the nation needs the in- 
fluence of the student, as she has not for 
the last thirtj^ years. Its social organi- 
zation is undergoing a mighty revolution, 
and it is a question whether that revolu- 
tion will be bloodless. During the last 
year the troops have been called out in 
three States at the same time to suppress 
violence, and no attempt has been made 
to remove the cause for that violence. 

The political phase of our country is a 
menace to our free institutions. Jay 
Gould accumulated his millions by his 
ability to bribe juries and legislators. 
We need not go far to find men standing 
high in political favor who should be in- 
mates of our penitentiares. The frequent 
miscarriage of justice has bred contempt 
for the civil authorities, and our judicial 
machinery is becoming more and more a 
complicated and expensive device for the 
protection of villainy; while the New York 
Times in a recent article declared that 
the liquor power exerts more influence in 
our politics than the combined influence 
of the churches, colleges, public schools, 
ministers, teachers and students com- 
bined. The Nation is looking for strength 
to support her in this hour of trial. She 
knows with many regrets that one-seventh 
of her children were born on foreign 
shores. She knows that those who con- 
trol the intricate features of monied poli- 
tics regard her interests as secondary and 
their private gain of prime importance, 
and from those gloomy features she turns 
to you and leads you out before the world 
saying, " These are my jewels." She does 
not call upon you young men to give the 
power of reason that you have had the 
opportunity to develop, into other hands 
and permit it to be fashioned by influence 
and led in paths where conscience is 



8 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



stifled and reason objects to control, nor 
to take those paths of ease and indolence 
which fashion modern social life and to 
withwraw from the social problem for 
fear of being contaminated by the associa- 
tions of active life. 

But as men of energy, men with earnest 
convictions, men with the national wel- 
fare first in all actions and willing to 
make all sacrifices to advance the welfare 
of a people, she looks to you and asks you 
to assist to rid herself of those dangers 
which threaten to destroy her very exis- 
tence. She does not call upon you young 
ladies to merely pass amid the bustle and 
glitter of social life, as the butterfly pass- 
ing pleasure to pleasure, not living real 
life but merely an existence, but for the 
purpose of casting sunshine in some 
gloomy pathwa} r , of making some life 
better by worthy actions she calls upon 
you to assist in making the nation better 
and causing its purpose to be more ele- 
vating. True manhood alone can not 
guide the ship of state through the pres- 
ent trials, but true manhood united with 
worthy womanhood is the country's 
present hope. 

May you be determined as never before 
to live for your country and for her 
people. Whatever favorite motto may be 
yours, whatever sentiment you may have 
chosen for your guide in life, never forget 
that motto emblazoned on yonder escutch- 
eon, that motto bore on the principle of 
the eternal honesty of the human soul, 
and portraying a power which will sup- 
port true manhood and womanhood in-an}' 
period of life, " Esse Quam Videri." - 

Be rather than seem, but act also your 
part as a man and woman. And amid 
the varied scenes which may characterize 
life's actions, may you so live and may 
your influence be so exerted that when 
you pass from the narrow limits of this 
life to the boundless extent of an immor- 
tality, and you take a last lingering 
glance at those scenes which are so dear, 
may you see the nation in whose institu- 
tions fostered 3'our developements, and 
for whose welfare the most active years 
of your life were spent, and purified from 
those stains which tarnish her reputation, 
freed from those associations which she 
loathes and disgusts. May 3-our ears not 
be filled with those sad strains of sorrow 
and grief occasioned by outraged justice, 
but wafted on the breathings of life's 
evening, may you catch those glorious 



strains of rejoicing and praise, the over- 
flowing of a prosperous nation's heart 
the rejoicings of a people among whose 
concerns are the affairs of state, where 
justice fails not to the least of the citizen 
and where the welfare of all is the national 
creed. 



Our Inheritance. 



The material that the bygone centuries 
have accumulated in behalf of the general 
welfare may be properly called our in- 
heritance or the acquirements we have in 
store for the twentieth century. 

This bequeathment is the great instru- 
ment whereby we must shape the destiny 
of the new born monarch of time. 

No event has ever yet taken place or 
anything great been accomplished that 
time did not prove the chief factor for 
bringing about the highest attainments of 
our expectations. 

When Columbus first beheld the land of 
the new continent he little thought that 
this should some day become a nation so 
powerful that the great European despots 
should for once lay aside the sway of 
power over the whole world and bow in 
humble recognition to her majesty. 

But the exiled fugitives who first sought 
refuge in her fold did not live to witness 
any such achievements, nevertheless it 
gradually sought development under their 
fostering care. 

The first inheritance to be acquired was 
nothing but the country in a wild and dis- 
orderly condition; this, although no great 
compensation, was highly prized by those 
who were suffering the bitter pangs of per- 
secution, and in the short time of two cen- 
turies they were enabled to sound the 
trumpet proclaiming their liberty and in- 
dependence to all quarters of the globe. 

All this they did not accomplish by each 
succeeding generation folding their hands 
in idleness after they were once given the 
guardianship of the nation's interest as an 
attempt to check time in making a succes- 
sion. What had been already accom- 
plished only proved a stronger desire W r 
the eager hands to hasten upon gi' eate 
achievements. 

All things were developed in a V r 
gressive ratio as they were handed do 
from one generation to another. 

The defects that so frequently accoj 
pany these transpositions could 



ii 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Lands 
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not 



detract any of the energy which was 
struggling that the right should win. 

The days we so often meet that are 
dark and dreary are all a necessity to 
have us appreciate all the more the sun- 
shine that lights upon the true pathway 
of happiness. 

The gloom that at times threatens to 
overshodow the country is a manifesta- 
tion of the dangers that are maturing in 
our midst. 

The greatest trial that has yet been 
witnessed we passed through in our late 
civil war when one of the worst evils that 
had left a stain on history was totally 
blotted out of existence. It had flour- 
ished with the country and had grown 
almost as stable in its power. Its 
abolishment could only be brought about 
by the sacrifice of many useful lives. 

We can well pride ourselves in the loss 
we sustain, to be made heirs of a country 
in which all men are recognized as free 
and equal to the one great end towards 
which divine authority legislates. 

When the smoke of this terrific battle 
has passed away, the intense feeling of 
enmity that has been aroused between the 
North and the South will fast vanish, and 
they will all the more fully realize the 
needs of a mutual dependence, and be- 
fore the next century shall dawn this 
distinct dividing line shall be no more, 
that the interests of one may become the 
treasured hopes of the other. 

Woman is not among the least that has 
made a great stride forward in the present 
century for personal liberty. Although 
she does not yet enjoy the freedom uni- 
versally that is granted her in our own 
country, but at the rapid pace civilization 
w spreading itself to all the people we 
can feel assured that the day is not far 
distant when we shall be heir to the uni- 
versal recognition of woman while she 
pursues the duties of her exalted position. 

Chief among all that has tended to 
wing about our present high attainments 
ail u upon which we must rely for all our 
achievements is education. It is the 
great promulgator of all pure, true and 
j= r »ncl ethics, teaching us in the highest 
ei jse the duty to ourselves and to others. 

Education has ever been given the 

5> s t careful attention, save in times 

ne & personal safety was at stake. No 
m 0ner than some of the colonies had per- 

anentjy ^ established themselves they 

0; uled institutions of learning, several 



of which to this day rank among the first 
of their contemporaries. 

Education has been most especially pro- 
gressive in the past century. The system 
has been entirely renovated by the estab- 
lishing of schools throughout the land and 
creating a greater interest for investiga- 
tion among the masses. Christianity, of 
which we enjoy the most perfect of type, 
is handed down in the most flourishing 
condition, for which we must be especially 
proud, since so much of the nation's wel- 
fare depends upon it for proper direction. 
The natural resources and inventive genius 
in which this country stands unsurpassed 
will also prove a great instigator for sub- 
stantiating its acquirements. America is 
undoubtedly destined to be the great 
centre of civilization ; it has never had an 
equal and as there are no more new worlds 
it can have no parallel. 

When the reigns of this great country 
with all its gains is bequeathed to us, we 
are not only responsible for the nation's 
welfare, but that of the entire world. 

Social progress knows no bound save 
its perfection. The greatest portion that 
has ever flourished is among the fruits of 
the nineteenth century. 

S. P. Bacastoe, '93. 



Oratorical Contest. 



The " Lebanon Daily Report " of May 
19 gives the following account. 

The oratorical contest held last evening 
in the chapel of Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, under the auspices of the Prohi- 
bition club, was in every way successful 
and creditable alike to the participants, 
the institution, as well as the cause that 
they represent. The exercises opened at 
7:30 o'clock, and there was a fair attend- 
ance. The musical selections included 
quartettes by Messrs. C rider, Meese, 
Huber and Good ; Solos by Messrs. 
Crider and Eshleman, and a duet by 
Prof. J. E. Lehman and Mr. D. S. Eshle- 
man. The orators and their subjects 
were as follows : 

A. S. Bomberger, " Foreign Immigra- 
tion ; " E. J. Meese, " The Dominant 
Issue ; " G. K. Hartman, " Sabbath Ob- 
servance ; " J. R. Wallace, " Woman's 
Suffrage;" N. C. Schlechter, " A Threat- 
ening Danger;" 0. E. Good, " War and 
International Arbitration ; " S. F. Huber, 
" The Foe to Civilization." 



10 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



These contests are arranged under a 
plan projected by the State and National 
organizations of the Prohibition party. 
In nearly every college in the country has 
been organized a Prohibition club among 
the students. Among their purposes is 
that of holding these oratorical contests 
upon the various subjects as advocated by 
the National Prohibition platform. There 
is a committee of judges appointed to pass 
upon the merits of the speakers and their 
productions, who select one speaker from 
each college in the State for a similar State 
contest ; while the successful participants 
in the various State contests will again 
engage in a National contest. The judges 
last evening were Rev. W. H. Lewars, of 
Annville, and Rev. P. C. Croll and Lee 
L. Grumbine, of Lebanon. They consid- 
ered the speech on "War and Interna- 
tional Arbitration," by 0. E. Good, as 
wortl^ of the first place on general merits. 
The contest was open to all students irre- 
tive of class rank. All the productions 
were carefully prepared and most of them 
were well delivered. They showed the 
young men to be possessed of the ele- 
ments of good speaking, needing only 
practice and training to make them good 
public speakers, reflecting credit upon 
their college. 



Xiterars Societies. 



Won a Prize. 



Mr. D. Albert Kreider, son of our edi- 
torial confrere, Mr. Joseph H. Kreider of 
the Anville Journal, and a member of last 
years' class of Lebanon Valley College, we 
are pleased to state, was recently awarded 
a scholarship prize of one hundred dollars 
by the Faculty of Yale University for meri- 
torious work done during the past year in 
the post-graduate department of that insti- 
tution. Mr. Kreider entered Yale Uni- 
versity last September^ and this success re- 
flects great credit upon him and upon Leba- 
non Valley College, where he received his 
college training. Lebanon Courier. 



Alumni Reunion. 

The alumni exercises on Tuesday even- 
ing, June 13, promises to be the best they 
have had for years. The programme is 
an especially interesting one, and one 
that will inspire and awaken interest. 
The annual banquet will be held after the 
exercises. 



Kalozetean Literary Society. 

Palma non sine Pulvere. 



For several evenings we have had n 
regular sessions of society, because of the 
entertainment given us by the Clionians 
and Philokosmians. 

On Friday evening, May 5, we attended 
the anniversary exercises of the P. L. S.; 
on May 12 we were very pleasantly enter- 
tained by the Clionians, who rendered 
very successfully the drama, " The Chape- 
ron." We congratulate the societ}' and 
the members who took part. 

We miss our brother, Rev. J. G. "W. 
Herold, who has finished his work and re- 
turned home until commencement. 

Because of the oratorical contest on 
Friday evening, May 19, we will have no 
society ; yet three sessions, and our work 
for the year is over. 

We are very glad to hear of some, of 
our ex-members, of their success, and 
their manifestation of continued interest 
in us. Some of the friends we have heard 
from are : Profs. W. S. Ebersole, J. F. 
Spangler, and E. 0. Burtner; Messrs. D. 
N. Scott, S. J. Evers. H. B. Yohn; Revs, 
J. A. Styter, J. H. Von Neida and H. T. 
Denlinger. May we not hear from others 
before the year passes ? 



Philokosniian Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 



On the eve of May 5, the society cele- 
brated its 26th anniversary. Notwith- 
standing the unfavorable condition of the 
weather, a large audience greeted the 
speakers as they were ushered to the 
rostrum. The Orpheus Club of Lebanon 
furnished the music, which, it is needless 
to say, was very ably rendered. 

The literary part of the program^ 
sustained the reputation for thoroughness 
which the society has gained for itsel* 
The Ex-Philo oration by Prof. GerbericB 
was unusually interesting and instructive, 
and was delivered in fine oratorical stj _ 

A fair representation of the ex-member 
was present on the occasion. As a 1 
account of the exercises will be gi ven 



another column, suffice is to say, 
occasion was a success in every 



that the 
respec 1 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



11 



-ad that it caused every Philo to feel 
t na t another milestone on our literary 
journey as a society has been successfully 
passed. 

On the 22nd ult. Messrs. Kreider, 
Backastoe, Rudy , Good and Hoerner, as 
a delegation from the society, attended 
the funeral of Mr. Hoverter in Hunimels- 
town. Mr. Hovetre was an ex-member of 
the society. 

Rev. D. S. Eshleman visited the Naval 
Review at New York. Mr. Eshleman hav- 
ing remained in New York over the Sab- 
bath, his pulpit in Paradise was filled by 
the Rev. Meese. G. K. Hartman attended 
the conference of Y. M. C. A. presidents, 
held at Carlisle, April 2 nil to 30th. On 
account of illness Mr. Hartman was de- 
tained at his home for several days before 
returning to school. J. P. Wallace still 
makes occasional trips to Harrisburg. 
Among our visitors during the month 
were Messrs. Weaver, Henry, Smith, Herr 
and Gingrich. On the eve of the 12th 
fast, we were invited by the ladies to meet 
at their hall. 

We were promptly on hand at the ap- 
pointed time. The ladies then marched 
us, together with the faculty and Kalos, 
to the Chapel, where an excellent literary 
treat, in the form of a drama, was given 
for our entertainment. 

The play was a good one ; some parts 
being very pathetic, while others were ex- 
ceedingly ludicrous ; and the ladies per- 
formed their respective parts admirably 
well. The boys were so highly pleased that 
they could not refrain from expressing 
their appreciation of the ladies' efforts in 
some way. They did so in a song at the 
close of the exercises, tendering their 
thanks and closing with a " good night," 
to the ladies. 



Philokosmian Anniversary. 

Notwithstanding the disagreeable weath- 
er on Friday evening, May 5, the friends 
° l the Philo! tosmian Literary Society 
Jwned out en masse to hear their favor- 
J es celebrate their twenty-sixth anniver- 
* r Y- The chapel was well filled, and the 
uuience showed its appreciation of the 
'ercises by the applause that greeted 
* er y speaker at the close of his produc- 

n - The rostrum presented a beautiful 
y arance a nd was decorated very taste- 
t , V under the direction of Miss Dittmar, 
ue teacher of Art. 



The music was furnished by the famous 
Orpheus Club of Lebanon, and it was 
very much appreciated by the audience. 

The president of the society, W. H. 
Kreider, extended a cordial welcome to 
the audience and spoke of the work of 
the society clone during the } r ear. 

After which the programme was car- 
ried out as follows : 

March Becker 

Orpheus Club. 
Invocation, by Rev. H. B. Spayd. 

Quartette— "The Tear," Witt 

Messrs. Barr, Williams, J. Will, McAdams 

and Lineaweaver. 
Oration, "The Perils of American Liberty," 
by J. L. Meyer. 

Among the things he said : 

The American Nation, though founded 
on the grandest principles of liberty, is 
subjected to internal perils. 

Liberty of ballot is denied to the voter 
by the politician. 

Politicians ask for candidates rather 
than great, and good men. 

Since the dominating political parties 
are so nearly equal, the politician appeals 
to the foreigner so as to secure the bal- 
ance of power in the election, thus secur- 
ing foreign instead of American liberty. 

Love of money has led to the formation 
of rings and trusts, creating monopolies 
and thereby denying the liberty of com- 
petition. 

Combinations try to regulate wages 
which results in labor agitation, and the 
laborer is obliged to join one of these or- 
ganizations and surrenders his privileges 
to the dictates of labor agitators 

The politician, major capitalist and 
labor agitators with their attending 
satellites form an oligarchal rule of our 
government. 

To remedy these evils the sanction of 
public sentiment is required. It cannot 
be led by the politician. When this is 
acquired then will the prosperity of the 
individual depend on his own enterprise. 
Then will a new epoch in the history of 
American liberty be formed. 
Oration, "Conservatism in Education," by 
Simon P. Bacastow. 

The general welfare is exposed to great 
danger in any delay to enthuse a more 
progressive spirit in education. The 
erection of school houses and higher 
institutions of learning throughout the 
land are no evidence that education is in 
the most flourishing condition. Thor- 
ough information is too much the aim of 



12 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



so many of the higher institutions of 
learning. 

The age does not so much demand a 
well informed man as it needs an ably 
trained man. 

The determining of the destiny of 
society depends upon the educating of the 
individual to maintain its interests. The 
perpetuating of universal happiness de- 
mands a revolutionizing of the entire 
system of education. 

Solo and Chorus (selected), 

Mr. Lineaweaver. 

Eulogy, "This was a Man," by Horace W. 
C rider. 

He gave a brief description of his life, 
showing that in all his life work he was 
a a man " much admired and much beloved 
by all. In all his undertakings he always 
took a pronounced part. He was not only 
a brilliant, loyal and influential member 
of his own church, but did more to further 
the cause of Christian unity and a com- 
mon understanding among Christian men 
than any man of his time. He was a firm 
believer in a United Church. His motto 
through life was " Love thy neighbor as 
thyself." It was because he literally 
loved his neighbor as himself, that this 
man has the love of his neighbor this wide 
world over. He was a great bishop, a 
greater preacher and greatest of all a man. 

The Critique, by 0. E. Good, brought 
forth the merits and demerits of "The 
Critical Period of American History," a 
recent work written by Mr. Fiske, a promi- 
nent lecturer on American Revolutionary 
History. After briefly noticing the con- 
dition of affairs during the period which 
the author regarded as the most critical 
in American History, the speaker pointed 
out some of the prominent characteristics 
of the work. Among these were mentioned 
his care in weighing the results of his ex- 
tensive research; his keen ability to in- 
vestigate character as shown in accounting 
for the actions of statesmen ; the clearness 
with which he has described the causes of 
events, both remote and direct; the able 
manner in which he has described how 
different conditions, such as educational 
advantages, moral ideas, local prejudices, 
and industrial pursuits, — influence the peo- 
ple ; and the mathematical accuracy of his 
language. 

The speaker closed by referring to 
several qualities of the author which might 
not be universally approved, yet as a whole, 



he spoke of the work as a model of his. 
torical excellence. 



Solo, . 



.Murdoch 



Mr. Geo. B. Freist. 
Ex-Philo— Oration, "The American Student 
in the Nation's History," by Prof. A. H 
Gerberich, of "Williamstown, Pa. [p rof ' 
Gerberich's address is given in full j 
another page. ] 

Waltz, Vogel. 

Orpheus Club. W. E. H, 



Board of Education. 

The late General Conference elected 
the following members of the Board of 
Education for the coming four years : 
E. B. Kephart, D. D., LL. D. 
Thos. J. Sanders, Ph. D. 
Geo. A. Funkhouser, D. I). 
Robert J. White, A. M. 
E. Benj. Bierman, Ph. D. 
L. Bookwalter, D. D. 
Henry Garst, D. D. 
Robert Cowden, Litt. D. 
J. W. Etter, D. D. 
Wm. M. Beardshear, D. D. LL. D., 
Eight of these have been or are now at 
the head of educational institutions, and 
we look for the inauguration of wise and 
effective measures for the future. 



Commencement Week. 

The following is the programme for 
Commencement Week : 

Sunday, June 11, 1893, 10 a. ni.— Baccalau- 
reate Sermon by Rev. Bishop J . Weaver, V, 
D.; 2 p. m.— Bible Normal Union Exercises; 
7 p . m. —Annual Sermon by Rev. M. B. Spaya. 

Monday, June 12, 7:30 p. m.— Commence- 
ment Exercises of the Music Department. 

Tuesday, June 13, 9 a. m.— Annual Meeting 
of the Board of Trustees ; 7:30 p. m.— Alumni 
Association Exercises. _ 

Wednesday, June 14, 2:30 p. m.— Class JJJ 
Exercises ; 7:30 p. m.— Address before «» 
Literary Societies by General D. H. Hastily • 

Thursday, June 15, 9 a. m.— Commencemeu 
Exercises. Orations, Conferring of Degree 
etc. 



Athletics. 

The athletic spirit of the school fotj 
every way becoming a college. Sincfi 
ground west of the campus hfis . tjc 
opened, the students are very enthustfj^J 
over sports. Two beautiful tennis com- 
have been made on the brow of the inc i 
A new ball ground has been made on 
northwest. The diamond has been scW 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



13 



and leveled, which make the grounds one of 
jjje best in the State. A number of games 
tove been played by visiting clubs. L. 
y C. thus far has not lost a game on the 
home grounds, and only one away. The 
boys lmve done good work, }<et are capable 
by better training of even excelling their 
already enviable record. New suits of 
special design are needed. It is proposed 
by the ladies (L. V. C. maidens are alwa}^s 
ready to lend a helping hand and to aid 
in a worthy cause) to make the suits. 



EARN IT. 

Of course you are proud that your fathers 
were good ; 

'Tis a pleasure to know they were great 
In the field, on the bench, or in science or art, 

Or as leaders in matters of state. 

But we all should remember our ancestors' 
fame, 

Is not for their children to wear ; 
To the fame of the great man the family name 
Is the only legitimate heir. 

The fame that is yours is the fame you have 
won ; 

If you've not won it yet, look ahead, 
But don't claim the honor because you're the 
son, 

Of ancestors centuries dead. 

Of proud ones who live on the fame of their 
sires 

Examples in plenty are found : 
Like the turnip and parsnip, they seem not to 
know 

That the best of them lies underground. 

Look ahead to the future — the past is not yours; 

For your prize trust the future alone, 
The fame of the past is another's reward, 

Make the yield of the present your own. 

Inherited titles of honor are vain, 
In the heat of fame's handicap chase 

The plain man looks forward, the noble man 
looks back, 
And oftentimes loses the race. 

Look forward, toil onward, and when in the 
end, 

Well merited honors you've won, 
" e proud that vour claim to the prize did not 
lie 

In being somebody's son. 

— Harper'' s Young People. 



Our Exchanges. 

^oun£ St. Joseph Collegian, Baltimore, 
Muemosyneau, Decatur, Ga.; High 
Wool Register, Hyde Park, Mass.; The 
*W School Student, Pittsburgh, N. Y.; 
W The College Mercury, Gettysburg, 

• a re some of our new exchanges. 

■^e last issue of The Pioneer styled 



our paper The College Town. That is a 
new name but it does not suit us as well 
as The College Forum. 

" My Trip to Mars and What I Saw " is 
an interesting serial which appeared in 
the recent issues of The Living Stone. 

"Milton as a Poet," is an excellent 
article in the last issue of The Color ndo 
Collegian. 

Some writer who has given careful con- 
sideration to his subject, gives some good 
suggestions to those who enjoy a game of 
tennis. They appear in the Washington 
Jeffersonian, entitled " Practical Points 
in Tennis Plajdng." 

The Student makes its appearance in a 
new dress which is very becoming. The 
entire make up of the paper is greatly 
improved by the change. 

The sum of the salaries of college pro- 
fessors is annually $80,000,000. 

A young colored lady took the first 
prize for the best entrance examintion to 
Chicago University. 

Princeton authorities will not allow a 
student to bring a watch into the room at 
the coming examinations. — The Muhlen- 
berg. 

The companions chosen by a young man 
at the beginning of his battle in life, de- 
termine for him what he will accomplish 
in his after life. — Exchange. 



Christians on Sunday Trains. 

Among those who fill the trains, that 
do not rest on the Sabbath, are many who 
confess that the day is given to God, and 
should be kept sacred to Him. They are 
absent from home, it may be, and are so- 
licitous to return. The Saturday evening 
train is a strong temptation ; they take it, 
and are in their places at the church at 
the next morning service. But in the 
meantime they have lost the Sabbath 
morning, and have given their influence to 
those who desecrate the holy day. In the 
same way it is not an uncommon thing 
for business men to leave home on the 
evening of the Sabbath, to be ready for 
their work in a distant city on the fol- 
lowing morning. They have "gained a 
day," and so satify their conscience that 
they are justified in what they have done. 
Thev would not open their places of busi- 
ness on Sabbath evening, but in another 
way they give so much of the day to ex- 



14 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



clusively secular and worldly interests. 
The desecration of the Sabbath by the 
railroad companies is protected by the use 
Christians make of the trains on that day. 
Among those in the service of corpora- 
tions which, in whole or in part, continue 
their worldly work on the Sabbath, are 
many who would gladly rest according to 
the Scriptures, but they cannot without 
losing their situations. Their compro- 
mise weakens the regard of others for the 
sacreclness of the day. When appealed 
to, their answer is that some of the mana- 
gers for whom they work are church 
members. — The Central Baptist. 



While we may rejoice in the strong 
and growing tendency of the church to 
apply Christian principles to social and 
economic life, we may also note with 
satisfaction that co-incidentally with this 
tendency, a marked change has taken 
place in some of the ethical conceptions 
of the economists. The day when politi- 
cal economy, regarding man as a mere 
thing, a dumb factor in an industrial pro- 
cess, was not altogether unjustly termed 
" the dismal science," has passed, we may 
hope, never to return. It is acknowledged 
by all leading thinkers that all economic 
theories which fail of an ethical concep- 
tion of man, must be misleading and land 
one in false conclusions, that all efforts to 
sever economics entirely from ethics must 
be futile. The laborer is not a thing, but 
a man. And just because he is a man, 
having volition, feeling, conscience, we 
cannot correctly estimate the efficiency of 
his labor without remembering that he is 
a self-determining sentient, sensitive be- 
ing. Nor can we have any healthy and 
durable organization of industrial society 
without considering his rights and duties 
as a man. — President Angel. 



The New England Magazine for June opens 
with an interesting paper dealing with the men 
and times of the "The Boston Tea Party." 
It is fully illustrated with reproductions of old 
and scarce engravings of the period and is 
written by Francis E. Abbot. Price Collier 
gives the history of "The Old Meeting House 
in Hingham, Mass.," the first church organized 
in America. The article is finely illustrated 
by M. Lamont Brown. Katharine Lee Bates 
contributes a long poem on "The Funeral of 
Phillips Brooks." Charlotte Fo.rten Grimke 
gives a pleasant chapter of her "Personal 
Recollections of the poet Whittier." Ralph 
Adams Cram writes a fine sonnet, "Dante in 
Exile." John Albee, the author of "Prose 
Idyls," contributes a sketch, "A Mountain 



Maid." There is an instalment of Benjamin 
Penhallow Shillaber's autobiography, 
periences during many Years." Charles Fred" 
erick Danforth writes a paper on "Trout Fish 
ing in New England," which is seasonable at 
this time, and is filled with useful information 
for the lovers of the fly and rod. It is 
trated by Jo. H. Hatfield and H. Martin Bea'l 
Richard Burton has some pretty lines, "From 
a City Window." Albert Hardy tells of the 
delights of June in delicate verse, "Jvm^a 
Noonday." Prof. Julius E. Olson, of the 
University of Wisconsin, contributes an able 
judicial account of "Norway's Struggle f or 
Political Liberty." Mrs. Helen Campbell's 
serial, "John Ballantyne, American" is con- 
tinued. Edith M. Thomas is represented by a 
strong poem called "The Fugitive," based 
upon Heine's line, "I shall return to God." 
Edith Mary Norris, the poet and story writer, 
conducts a department of Household Science 
and Art, of interest to the lady readers of the 
Magazine. 



QUMBERLAND VALLEY RAILROAD. 

TIME TABLE— Dec. 18, 1892. 



Down Trains. 



Lv. Winchester 

" Marthvburg ..... 

" Hagerstown 

" Greencastle 

" Cliambersburg .. 

" Shippensburg 

" Newvi le 

" Carlisle. 

" Mechauicsburg.. 
Ar. Dillsburg 

" Harrisburg 



Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Baltimore 



6 15 
6 35 

6 55 

7 20 
7 44 



8 05 



Ky'e 


Mr'g 


Day 


Ev'g 


5* 


Exp 


Mail 


Exp 


Mail 


Exp 


No. 2 


No. 4 No. 6 


No. 8 


Xo.10 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


p. «. 


6 20 






2 20 


500 


7 03 






310 


710 


7 42 


8 25 


11 45 


400 


1005 


8 06 




12 09 


4 26 


1025 


8 30 


9 02 


12 32 


506 


10 40 


8 52 




12 53 


5 20 


1107 


912 




1 10 


5 41 


112; 


9 35 


9 51 


1 35 


6 07 


1145 


10 00 




12 55 


6 34 


1204 






4 43 


7 05 




10 20 


10 25 


218 


715 


1220 










A.M. 


1 25 


1 25 


6 50 


10 55 


425 


4 00 


4 00 


9 35 


3 50 


710 


1 25 


1 25 


6 45 


10 40 


620 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5:55 a. m., 12:30 p. m., 3:45 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 1:15 p. m.,4:33 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cliam- 
bersburg. 



Lv. Baltimore 

" New York.. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



" Harrisburg 

" Dillsburg 

" Mechanicsburg . 

" Carlisle 

" Newvilie 

" Shippensburg .... 
" Chambersburg.. 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 




Additional trains will leave Harrisburg daily except s 
at 8:25 a. m., 10:35 a. m.. 5:15 p. m., arriving at Carlisle *■ 
a. m., 11:20 a. m., 6:00 p. m., stopping at all in« r f" isbur g 
stations ; on Saturday additional train will leave ^LpniaS 
at 6:20 p. m., arriving at Mechauicsburg 6:41 p. m..Bi r" 
at all intermediate stations. „ndS e * 

Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hagerstown au <■ oB 
York on Keystone Express and Night Express easi, »" 
Memphis Express and New OrleanH Express wt-st.^ nr]ei$ 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New " 
Express between Philadelphia and Ntw Orleans. 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



15 



Ex- 
rei 
ish- 
e at 
tion 
lug- 
teal, 
rom 

the 
ne's 

the 
able 

for 
ell's 
con- 
by a 
ased 
od." 
•iter, 
ence 

the 



N'gt 
Exp 

No.10 

P.M. 

500 
710 
10 05 
1025 
1046 
1107 
1127 
1145 
1204 

1220 
A.M. 
425 
710 



nday at 
nediate 
m.,4:33 



N.O. 



I No. 9 

P.M. 
425 
500 
740 

P.M. 

1025 



10 « 
, 1053 

8 

" 1 1225 



stopP inS 



^ w>n wish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
T write to GEO. P. ROWELL & Co., No. 10 Bpruoe Street, 

l«*W*.___ 

^TT^jTr^ne^n need if information on the subject of ad- 

E vprtising will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
. i Jrtisers. ' ' 368 p;iges, pri. e one dollar. Mailed, postage 
•inn receipt of price. Contains a careful compilation from 
h American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
a (•lass journals: gives the circulation rating of every one, 
i aiiood ileal of information about rates and other matters 
ratiilnK to the business of advertising. Address ROW- 



EL'S ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, Mew 
York. 

"Everybody's Law Book," 

T8 the title of the new 768 page work now in press, 
m-enared by J. Alexander Koones, L L. B., member 
of the New York Bar. 

It enables every man and woman to be their own 
lawyer. It teaches what are your rights and how to 
maintain them. When to begin a law suit and when 
to shun one. It contains the useful information 
every business man needs in every State in the Un- 
ion It contains business forms of every variety 
useful to the lawyer as well as to all who have legal 
business to transact. 

Inclose two dollars for a copy, or Inclose two-cent 
nn«ta se stamp for a table of contents and terms to 
went!. Address BENJ. W. HITCHCOCK, Pub- 
lisher, 385 Sixth Avenue, New York. 




REED'S 
ROSES 



AND SEED never fail 
to give satisfaction to all wh« 
follow his cultural directions, 
, which are sent with ever yorder. 
" ' ""■":"« . .Here is an offer: Best trial 
pkg. of Roses in America— 16 fine pi ants, all differ- 
ent, good kinds, strong growers, splendid roots, all for 
!* I .OO. 7 for oOc. Sample Rose or 3 pkts. flower seed 
Kith catalogue for luc. Order at once. Mention paper 
WJi. B. REED Florist. Chainbersburg, Pa7 



W, F. BECKER. 



J. P. BKUGGER. 



~% THE 



Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Special Kates to Students. 

^Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 

T L. SAYLOR & SONS, 

J" MANUFACTURERS OF 

carriages, 

LIGHT BUGGIES, PONY PHAETONS, ETC. 
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS. 

Shops Opposite Eagle Hotel, ANNVILLE, PA. 

£ B. MARSHALL, M. L\, 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLE. PA. 

ISAAC MANN & SON, 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, I? A. 

E Bfi ST GOODS FOR THE LEAST MONEY. 



T R. McCAULY, 
DAILY MEAT MARKET. 

GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. ANNVILLE. FA. 



J 



OHN TRUMP, 
BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 

ANNVILL E, PA. 

WS. SEABOLD, 
. DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumery and Toilet Articles, 



J. 

w 



No. a East Main St., Annville, Pa. 

S. KENDIG, 

BAKERY, 

Next Door to Eag le Hotel, Annville, Pa. 

J. KIEFER, M. D., 

HOMEOPATHIC PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON. 

76 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 

D~ EXTER LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLE 
RAILROAD ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 

R. A. MAULFAIR, - PROP'R. 

GOOD TEAMS AT REASONABLE BATES. 

^yiLLIAM KIEBLER^ 

SHA VING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

ADAM B. HESST^ 
OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE. 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 
ANNVILLE. FA. 

JACOB SARGENT, 
^FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 Main St., Annville, Pa. 

R Y GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 



D 



GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 
J. S. SHOPB, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

A C. M. HEISTER, 
rl« STATIONERY JOB PRINTER, 

Visiting Cards a Specialty. 
35 S. White Oak Str eet - - Amvrile, Pa. 

W"lLLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 
HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KBEIDEB. JNO. E. HE BR. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 



r-pHE BEST 



STOCK, THE 

PRICES IN 



LOWEST 



FURNITURE, 



AT 

Joseph Miller's. 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



ft 



16 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



HVC. H. SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS- 
TERS AND CREAM. ANICYILLE, PA. 

S. M. SHENK S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Ann Vi lie. 

St. IB. WAGNER, 

— Headquarters f or -v- — 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 

Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



If yon want to Bny a Hat right, and a right Hat, or anything in 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

successors to RAITT d, Co., 

708 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa. 

KinpQirt^ & Shenk 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 



THE 

U.B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March H, i&gg 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $3.f 0. 

Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $146,809.94 

Contingent Assets 116.970.00 

Assessment Basis 5,295,uoo.oo 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,123.01 

THE PLAN. 

Thepayment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for four years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, with 
peo rata mortality assessments for each death of a 
member insured tor $1000, is as follows: 



AGE. 


Ass't 


Age. 


ASS'MT 


Agk. 


Ass'mt 


Age. 


Assm't 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


50 


1 30 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


9J 


51 


140 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


52 


i m 


23 


68 


33 


81 


43 


96 


53 


1 60 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


54 


1 70 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 01) 


55 


1 80 


26 


71 


36 


86 


46 


1 06 


56 


192 


27 


72 


37 


87 


47 


1 12 






28 
29 


73 
74 


38 
39 


88 
89 


48 
49 


1 18 
1 24 











This will entitle a member to a certificate of $1000 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, when- 
ever such death may occur. 

Reliable Agents Wanted Everywhere. 

CHOICE BEEF, LAMB, VEAL, PORK AND 
TONGUES at 

Maulfair's Daily Meat Market, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 




things. 
Sent 



Vick's Floral Guide. 

"" F or !8o3 we have combined a most novel and charming feature in the way of hun- 
dreds of beautiful and appropriate poetical quotations from the best authors, making 
The Poets' Number Of ViCk'S Floral Guide a source of interest and pleasure 
the whole year. The practical part contains Colored Plates of Alpine Aster, 
Begonia, Dahlias, Dutchman's Pipe, Clematis, Pansies, Cannas, Corn and 
Potatoes, hundreds of Engravings ; descriptions of the sweetest and most prolific 
Pea— The Charmer, The Golden Nugget Corn, which was such a favorite last 
summer, new Roses, new Chrysanthemums, and scores of other grand and good 
Names and prices of everything one could desire in way of Flowers, Vegetables, Plants, Bulbs 
for only io cents, which can be deducted from the first order, thus it costs nothing. Cash pri 

JAMES VICK'S SONS, Rochester, N. Y.' 



etc. 
zes. 



THE 



lar. 
9.9< 
0,00 
O.00 
3.01 



ere- 
nth 
Jf a 



College Forum 



•hen- 



AND 



JUNE, 1893. 



f CONTENTS: + . 



PAGE 

Editorials .... 17 

Commencement Week 17-19 

Commencement Day 19-21 

Board of Trustees 21-23 

Gen. Hastings at Annville 23, 24 

The Junior Banquet 24, 25 

War and International Arbitration. . . .25-27 
Pennsylvania Chautauqua 27, 28 



PAGE 

Honored 28 

A Well-Merited Honor 28 

Athletics ^ 28, 29 

State Inter-collegiate Prohibition Associ- 
ation 29, 30 

Philokosmian Literary Society 30 

College Day Collections 30 

Advertisements. 31,32 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE, 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



MOOR'S CAFE, 115 AND 117 NORT H NINTH S TREET, LEBANON, PA. 

HARRY LIGHT, 

BOORS AND STATIONERY, 



22 EAST MAIN ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 



w 
o 

SB 

< 

o 
X 
w 

l Q 
SB 
< 

►J 
>— J 

w 

CQ 
W 



Our shelves are constantly filled with 
New, Second-Hand and Shelf-Worn 



Together with a Complete Assortment of 



O 

© 

) > 

O 

SB 
W 

3 



STATIONERY, 

Wall Paper and Window Shades, s 



ON MAKKET ST., AT THE RIVER BRIDGE, 

HAERISBURG, PA. 

CARPETS, OIL CLOTHS, ETC. 



A Selected Stock of the 

LATEST STYLES OF WALL PAPER 

AND 

DECORATIONS. 



CO 
O 
O 

00 




SCHOOL AND COLLEGE TEXT BOOKS A SPECIALTY. 
C- SMITH, 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



HEADQUARTERS FOR 

COLLEGE AND SCHOOL SUPPLIES, 

INCLUDING 
NORMAL DEPARTMENT. 
OLD BOOKS. NEW BOOKS. 

Cheapest place in the Lebanon Valley to buy your 
Books. «S=- New and Old Books Bought, 
Sold and Exchanged. 

WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JEWELRY, 

SILVER PL ATE D WARE, 

Spectacles a Specialty. ritted %t?^ n Gold ' 

PERFECT FOCUS AND FIT GUARANTEED. 

ISAAC WOLF, 

JftN 'S 



Always sold at the Lowest Cash Prices. All Goods 
Guaranteed to be as represe ted. Rag and Ingrain 
Carpets 35 cents per yard up. Floor and Table Oil 
Cloths 25 cents per yard up. 

F RED. W. YINGST, on Market St, at the Bridge. 



t -- 



When you need Books or Stationery of any kiiui 
correspond wi h or call on us. By so doing you will 
secure the Best Goods at the most Favorable Prloeft 

Stock always New and Fresh. Assortment Large. 
Prices the Lowest. Whether you intend to buy». 
or $25.00 worth, it will pay you to call to see us. 

Bagster's and Oxford Teachers' Bibles a Specialty. 
We carry in stock the publications of the U.B. 
Publishing House, such as Otterbein Hymnals, 
Hymns of the Sanctuary, the Books used in the 
three years' course of study, S. S. Music Books. 

AGKNTS WANTED to sell the best and niost 
popular Lord's Prayer published. Send 75 cents for 
sample copy, worth $2.00. Address plainly 

CBIDER & BROTHER,, 

PUBLISHERS OF 

Photograph MarriageCertiflcate 

Photograph Family Records, Etc, Etc., 



YORK, PA. 



ONE PRICE ONLY . 

SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 

SSS CUMBERLAND STREET. 

PLEASE MENTION "THE COLLEGE FORUM." ^ 

B p WY NINGS, Florist, Rose9 ' Carna ^l^ ut n °* e ' 

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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE. 



Vol. VI. No. 6. 



ANNVILLE, PA., JUNE, 1893. 



Whole No. 62. 



EDITORS. 



EDITOR IN CHIEF. 
H. Clay Deaner, A. M., 

Professor of Latin and Astronomy. 

FACULTY. 

E. Benj. Bierman, A. M., Ph. D., President. 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 
John E. Lehman, A. M., Professor of Mathematics. 
Rev. Jno. A. McDermad, A. M., Professor of Greek. 
John A. Shott, Ph. B. B., Ped., 

Professor of Natural Science. 
Maey E. Sleichter, A. B., 

Professor of English and Modern Languages. 
Cakrie M. Flint, Professor of Piano and Voice. 
Alice K. Gingrich, M. A., Professor of Harmony. 
Emma A. Dittmar, Teacher of the Fine Arts. 

SOCIETY EDITORS. 
Clionian Society— Miss Maggie Strickxer, '94. 
PMlokosmian Society— Oscar E. Good, '94. 
Kalozetean Society— C. B. Pennypacker, '96. 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS. 
John H. Maysilles, '95. D. S. Eshelman, '94. 

William H. Kreider, '94. 



PUBLISHING AG EM. 
H. Clay Deaner. 



All communications or items of news should be sent to 
the Editor in Chief. Subscriptions should be sent to the 
Publishing Agent. 

THE COLLEGE FORUM will be sent monthly for one 
school year on receipt of twenty-flye cents. Subscriptions 
weired at any time. 

For terms of advertising, address the Publishing Agent. 

J^ 1- ^ at the Post ° fflce at Annville, Pa., as 
second-class mail matter. 



Editorial. 



The fall term opens September 4th. 



Mr. G. K. Hartman, '94, will spend 
I several weeks at the World's Conference 
of Workers at Northfield, Mass. 



Although students were glad to return 
^qiy home at the close of the past 
J®*, the parting caused many a tear to 
* ealth % glide down the cheek. The as- 
tt ° lations were so pleasant and joys so 

ani fold that the thought of a possible 



never meeting, or at least, not to meet as 
during the past year, brought solemn 
thoughts. Student life is distinctly form- 
ative. As the student life is to a great 
extent, will be the life when school clays 
are over. 



The reunion of Maryland students will 
be held at Frederick City, Md., July 28. 
The speakers for the occasion are Misses 
Anna Wilson and Anna Keedy, and 
Messrs. Maysilles and Meese and Rev. B. 
F. Daugherty. The music will be a 
special feature. 



Canvassing for students has already 
begun. The President spent several days 
last week in the northern section of this 
county and reports favorable. Others 
interested in our work write to us of 
young people in their neighborhood who 
speak of coming. Applications for the 
new catalogue are coming in daily. Let 
all our friends who read these lines con- 
stitute themselves agents to find students 
for the College. We want to begin the 
fall term with not less than one hundred 
young men and women on our roll. Our 
ministers are usually among our most 
successful agents. Brethren, if you learn 
of any one contemplating going to col- 
lege, drop our President a line. Let us 
enter upon a vigorons campaign at once. 



Commencement Week. 

SUNDAY MORNING. 

The morning dawned bright and clear. 
A refreshing breeze made it very pleasant 
and refreshing. The chapel was tastily 
decorated with flowers and ferns. The 
rostrum was occupied by Bishop Weaver, 



r 



18 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



President Bierrnan, the College pastor, 
Rev. Mr. Spayd, Ex-President C. J. Kep- 
hart, and Rev. H. P. Isett, of Strouds- 
bursj, Pa. 

The Bishop took for his theme " Christi- 
anity—Its Origin, Ethics and Triumphs," 
as based on Matt. 1:12, and 1 Cor. 15:25. 
The following is a succinct synopsis : 

1. The "old story," hence it's the 
crowning glory of our religion. 

2. Can such a religion be the natural 
development of the human intellect ? 

3. Could it be the confluence of various 
religions of antiquity, or arisen from 
Greek and Roman philosophy ? 

4. Christianity has no development. 

5. One who proclaimed such a system 
could not be an imposter. 

6. Men in all ages cared for the good 
and beautiful, but Christ took the refuse 
of society and raised them out of their 
degradation. 

T. Graduates, quit yourselves like men. 
Put on the whole armor. Your safeguard 
is Christianity. Avoid the rocks of infi- 
delity. Until something better than the 
Sermon on the Mount is presented you, 
stand courageously by your convictions. 

SUNDAY AFTERNOON. 

At 2:30 the graduating exercises of the 
Bible Normal Union were held. 

Bishop Weaver and Prof. Deaner oc- 
cupied the rostrum. Rev. J. B. Daugherty, 
of Cressona, Pa., led in prayer. 

G. A. L. Kindt, of Annville, Pa., re- 
viewed the life of " Abraham, The Friend 
of God." J. R. Wallace, of Norfolk, Ya., 
spoke on " The Greatness of Moses." 
" The Needs of the Sunday School " were 
presented by H. H. Sloat, of Manchester, 
Pa. Sheridan Garman had for his sub- 
ject, " God's Chosen Yessels." 

Bishop Weaver, in very appropriate re- 
marks, presented the diplomas. The 
motto of the class was " Live to Do." The 
pansy was the class flower, a cluster of 
which each wore. 

SUNDAY EVENING. 

The annual sermon was preached by 
Rev. M. B. Spayd, of Halifax, Pa., from 
Heb. 12: 1,2. Following is the outline: 

1. The end of life is to be like unto God. 

2. Human life is a race, which character 
is the goal. 

3. The teachings of Christ are essen- 
tially associated with his life. 

4. His was an immutable purpose. 



5. His acts were local,but motives which 
prompted the acts were universal. 

MONDAY EVENING. 

The musical commencement was the 
only event of the day. The rostrum was 
handsomely decorated. The chapel was 
crowded to overflowing. The rostrum 
was occupied by the performers, Presi- 
dent Bierrnan, Misses Flint and Gingrich, 
and Dr. C. A. Burtner, of York, Pa., who 
led in invocation. 

The following programme was ren- 
dered : 

FART I. 

Chorus. "Soldiers' Chorus,". .. .Gounod's "Faust." 
Piano Quartette/'Mazurka Des Traineaux," BisseU, 
Misss Stehman, Batdoif, Loose and Pennypacker. 

Vocal Solo, "Angel's Serenade," Braga. 

Miss Momma. 
„. „, S a. Adagio op., 27, No. 2,.... Beethoven. 

liano&oio. ^ b> Die Taubenpost, Schubert. 

MiS3 Batdorf. 

Ladies' Quartette, " Lady Bind," Cowen. 

Misses Sleichter, Flint, Forney and Gingrich. 

PART II. 

Vocal Solo, "Magnetic Waltz," Arditi. 

Miss Wilson. 

Piano Solo, *' Fantasie in C," Mozart. 

Miss Stehman. 
Violin Solo, Selected, 

Mr. Miller. 

Vocal Duet, " The Crimson Glow," Koot. 

Misses Wilson and Mumma. 
Conferring of Deplomas. 
Chorus, "Alone," Swiss Melody 

The rendition of the selections was 
done with consummate skill and ease. 
The prolonged applause after each per- 
formance was a proof of the approbation 
of the audience. The three graduate? 
were Misses Mary Batdorf, Anna Wilson 
and Katie Mumma. 

TUESDAY EVENING. 

'The Alumni exercises always attract 
large crowds, yet this year's seemed even 
larger. The following most unique ami 
interesting programme was rendered : 

Master of Ceremonies, Rev. B. F. Daugherty, '89. 
Baltimore, Md. p PP thoTen. 

Piano Duet V.'^fti ,11 

Misses Elvire Stehman and Anna BrigntDi" 

Invocation Rev. J. E KleffBWȣ 

Song, "Auld Lang Syne," ....... • — •^^JB 

Greeting Master of Ceiem"' 

Poem, " The Man of God," , T rnnn . 

Rev. John L. Keedv, '89, New Haven, tu« 
(Read by Reno S. Harp, '89.) zie , 

Quintette, "Hunter's Call, ~""~v Prof' 

Misses Pennypacker, Mumma and J ornej, * 
Lehman and Prof. W. H. Kindt. 
"The Alumni and L. V. C," pa. 

Rev. W. H. Washinger, '91, Bax™S^3P» 
"Our Ministers.".. Rev. 1. H. Albright, 7b /,\^ ae rtS' 
Piano Solo— "Harmony Divine,*' . . • ^ uu 

Miss Anna Brightbill. 
"Our Lawye™."^ p> ^ ^ ^ LeWrt »* 

"Our Doctors^ r ^ ^ d ^ 

Vocal Solo—" Silken Bands," Valse de conce^j. 

Miss Minnie Speck, Carlisle, Pa- 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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»Oar Women," . Mrs Alice Hagey, '77, Steelton, Pa. 
"Our Teachers," 

Prof. John E. Lehman, '74, Annville Pa 

Duet-" The Sinking Ship," White 

Prof. Lehman and Miss Anna R. Forney. 
"Our Wives," . Mr. A. L. Groff, '79, Hanisburg, Pa. 
Song-L- V. C. Song, The Audience. 

Our lawyers and doctors were absent 
oaavoidably. In the absence of Mr. Groff, 
the Master of Ceremonies called up Prof. 
Deaner to respond to " Our Wives." 

The L. V. C. Song was sung to the 
tune of "Marching Through Georgia." 
Words are given below : 

Sing a song together, boys. We'll sing it loud 
and clear. 

Sing it with a hearty will, and voices full of 
cheer ; 

Sing it as we used to sing it way back in Fresh- 
man year. 
While we were students at L. V. C. 

CHORUS. 

Hurrah! Hurrah ! Ring out the chorus free. 
Hurrah ! Hurrah ! For grand old L. V. C. 
Cares shall be forgotten and our sorrows flung 
away, 

When we are students at L. V. C. 

How we made the campus ring and echo to our 
tread, 

How the peaceful President would tremble in 
his bed, 

How the gates were left unhinged, the lamps 
without a head, 
When we were students at L. V. C. — Cho. 

Yes, and there were maidens, too, that heard 
our footsteps beat, 

When the moonlight shone along the still de- 
serted street, 

We woke for them the echoes with our sere- 
nading sweet, 
When we were students at L. V. C. — Cho. 

Arm in arm together, boys, we've wandered 
. _ :? through the night, 

"tep and song in unison and every heart was 
light, 

Ready for a serenade, a jubilee or fight, 
When we were students at L. V. (J. —Cho. 

When we took our final walk through this old 

classic town, 
How our voices trembled and our spirits were 
fi way down, 

°»H this sounding chorus every thought of 
grief would drown, 
When we are students at L. V. C.—Cho. 

The addresses were applauded through- 
out. It was universal verdict that 
exercises were the best the Alumni 
ever had. 

jplnimediateby after adjournment the an- 
Lad ^A min ^ banquet was served in the 



«es' Hall. 



WEDNESDAY. 



Tli 

*i v? annua l business meeting of Alumni 
s held in the mathematical room of the 
» 



College, President Daugherty in the chair. 
After the regular routine business the fol- 
lowing officers were elected: President, 
Miss Josie Kreider; Vice President, John 
W. Owen; Secretary, Anna Brightbill; 
Corresponding Secretary, Miss Anna 
Forney; Antiquarian, Hiram Steinmetz, 
and Treasurer, I. H. Albright. The ap- 
pointments for June, 1894, are as follows: 
Orator, Rev. J. G. Johnston ; Alternate 
Orator, Clayton H. Backenstoe; Essayist, 
Miss Mary M. Shenk ; Alternate Essayist, 
Miss Minnie Weinman ; Poet, Professor 
John E. Lehman; Alternate Poet, Miss 
Lillie Quigley. 

It was decided to have a grand rally 
meeting and banquet in Harrisburg on 
December 28, 1893. Committee of Ar- 
rangements, R. S. Harp, W. H. Hain and 
W H. Washinger. The ex-committee 
was reappointed. 

CLASS DAY. 

At 2:30 " Class Day " exercises were 
held. In the centre of the rostrum stood 
two rustic gates, open wide with the motto 
in the arch, " Honor Waits at Labor's 
Gate." The president, John L. Meyer, 
stated that the entertainment would be on 
fun and wit, but at no one's expense, save 
the class. The programme is to be loyal 
to faculty, to the trustees and to common 
sense. His introduction of the class was 
most happy and enjoyable. Mr. Bacastow 
was historian ; Miss Weinman, prophetess; 
Mr. Sloat, orator ; and Miss Stehman made 
the presentation. The president, in be- 
half of the class, for her liberality, pre- 
sented Miss Stehman with four photo- 
graphs of a gentleman once her ideal. 
The presentation of the Senior mantle to 
the Juniors was indeed a pleasant innova- 
tion by Horace Crider. The mantle was re- 
ceived by Miss Maggie Strickler, who re- 
sponded in most fitting words. The class 
song then followed. 

LECTURE. 

The annual lecture before the Literary 
Society was delivered by Gen. D. H. 
Hastings. An abstract of this eloquent 
address appears in another column. 



Commencement Bay. 

The day was delightfulty pleasant, and 
the large College Chapel was filled to its 
utmost capacity at an early hour. Music 
was furnished hy the Apollo Mandolin 



A 



20 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Orchestra, of Reading. A neat piece of 
rustic woodwork in the form of an arch 
occupied the front part of the stage and 
bore the class motto " Honor Waits at 
Labor's Gate." President Bierman opened 
the exercises in words of kindly welcome, 
and the Rev. C. I. B. Brane, of Washing- 
ton, D. C, offered prayer. The orations 
of the graduates then followed : 

The first speaker was S. P. Bacastow on 
the subject, "Political Difference." He 
said that the dominant political parties of 
the nation grew out of certain specific 
phases of belief relative to the ends to be 
accomplished by a free government admin- 
istered by the people. The fact that we 
have different parties arises from the fact 
that men have different views and methods 
relative to accomplishing the same great 
ends. Different parties are not therefore 
in themselves a menace to our free insti- 
tutions, but if proper ends are kept in 
view tend to promote a healthy and en- 
thusiastic rivalry, in which each tries to 
• surpass the other in the great contest for 
political preferment. 

The next speaker was Miss Elvire Steh- 
man on the subject, " American Aristo- 
cracy." She said we rejoice in the fact 
that the American people in theory 
stand on a political and ethical basis of 
equality and unity. Yet, notwithstanding 
this fact, the progress of our history 
shows that some dangerous features of 
aristocracy are making progress among 
us. Especially is this the case of the 
aristocracy of capital, by which the wealth 
of our nation is coming into the hands of 
a few millionaires, who hoard it and use 
it solely for personal aggrandizement and 
influence. 

Harry H. Sloat spoke on the subject of 
" Master and Men." He referred to the 
importance of an individual's mastering 
one subject and doing it well. The range 
of knowledge is too wide and the realm of 
discovery too diversified for a scholar to 
become proficient in more than one branch 
of knowledge. So in practical life few 
persons can follow more than one pursuit 
successfully. 

Next was H. W. Crider on the subject, 
" An Important Question." He spoke of 
the duty of the freed negro of the United 
States to help to elevate and Christianize 
his brothers in Africa. He said that it 
is an important question that while the ne- 
groes have been emancipated from slavery 
and given the privileges of civilization 



and Christianity that they are not more 
eager to Christianize and elevate their 
race elsewhere. 

The next speaker was Joseph G. W. 
Herold on the subject, " Luther." He 
said that we regard civil and religious 
liberty as the greatest material blessings 
that we enjoy. These, however, have an 
important relation to the work which 
Luther did 400 years ago. Europe was 
under the domination of the papacy. It 
had supreme authority in church and 
state; but Luther was the first one to 
break these ecclesiastical shackles. He 
was mighty because he had found the 
truth and dared to proclaim it. Through 
him liberty of mind and conscience 
dawned upon Europe, The people read 
and studied the Bible for themselves, and 
thus imbibed the spirit of emancipation 
which was destined to bloom in its fullest 
lustre on the American continent. 

This was followed by Miss Minnie 
Weinman on the subject, "Isabella.". She 
spoke of the generous nature of Isahella, 
and her convictions of national and reli- 
gious duty as some of the greatest prob- 
lems of history and religion confronted 
her. She was true to her convictions, 
generous in her nature, courageous in her 
efforts and firm in her principles. She 
lifted Spain to the greatest epoch of her 
history, and led the way to her greatest 
achievements. 

The next speaker was J. L. Meyer, on 
the subject, " The State and the Individ- 
ual." Individuals have an important re- 
lation to the state, and also the state to 
the individual. This is especially true 
with a free government like that under 
which we live. The sovereign power is 
vested in the people, and as the individual 
is trained so the state will be. It is im- 
portant, therefore, that we seek to tram 
to principles of true and loyal citizenship. 
It is important that the state furnish to 
the young the means of education, anfl 
that the young be required to avail them- 
selves of the opportuuities furnished. 

The last speaker was S. T. Meyer, upon 
the subject, " Public Sentiment. a . 
showed the might of public sentiment 1 
controlling the affairs of the in^T 
and nation. It has been effectual in 
riding the influence of factional con K 
tion and party rings and unwholeso _ 
legislation. It is the great factor m sn»jj 
ing our national h. story and progress, 
has emancipated us from slavery, has g 



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THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



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ns higher standards of national ethics and 
morals, and has been the safeguard against 
injustice, vice and demagogism. 

President Bierman then stepped for- 
ward, and after appropriate remarks, con- 
ferred the degrees and presented the 
diplomas to the graduates. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science was 
conferred on Misses Elvire C. Stehman 
and Minnie E. Weinman, and on Messrs. 
Simon P. Bacastow, Horace W. Crider and 
Joseph G. W. Herold. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts on 
Messrs. John L. Meyer and Samuel T. 
Meyer. 

Mr. Henry H. Sloat received a diploma 
certifying that he has completed the Aca- 
demic course. 

The degree of Master of Arts, in course, 
was conferred upon Rev. Sylvester K. 
Wine, A. B., class of 1882, and upon Prof. 
William H. Kindt, A. B., class of 1889. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy, in 
post-graduate course, was conferred on 
Rev. Isaac H. Albright, A. M., class of 
1876, and upon Rev. Benjamin P. Fritz, 
an alumnus of Union Biblical Seminary, 
class of 1884. 

The President also announced that the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Divinity was 
conferred upon Rev. Charles T. Stearn, 
of Chambersburg, Pa., and upon Rev. 
Ezekiel Light, editor of the " Froeliche 
Botschafter," of Dayton, Ohio, at yester- 
day's session of the Board of Trustees. 

The Rev. Mr. Brane pronounced the 
benediction, and congratulations and fare- 
wells followed. 



Board of Trustees. 

The Trustees of the College met in 
annual session on Tuesday morning, June 
13, 1893, at 9 o'clock. The Devotional 
Exercises were conducted by Mr. S. W. 
Clippinger. The following members were 
Presentyiz.: D. W. Crider, I. H.Albright, 
h A. Mutch, Isaac B. Haak, Cyrus F. 
{(ook, D. D. Keedy, Reno S. Harp, N. B. 

Solomon L. Swartz, A. H. Rice, 
J- H. Kreider, S. W. Clippinger, A. R. 
*omey } H . Wagner, Wm. H. ITlrich, 
; no - B. Stehman, Dan'l. Eberly, C. I. B. 
Br ane and Wm. H. TJhler. 

u - W. Crider, Esq., of York, Pa., was 
^ected President ; Wm. H. TJlrich, Vice- 
r ^sident, Isaac H. Albright, Secretary. 

*he following committees were ap- 
1JOl Qted by the President : 



Endowment— Messrs. Rice, Light, Steh- 
man, Deaner and Harp. 

Faculty— Messrs. Kreider, Keedy, Harp 
Mutch and Albright. 

Library and Ajyparatus—Fvofs. Deaner 
and Shott and Mr. Brane. 

Finance — Messrs. Swartz, Haak. 
Kreider, Eberly and Clippinger. 

Grounds and Buildings — Messrs. For- 
ney, TJhler, Flook, Wagner and TJlrich. 

Auditors — Profs. McDermad and 
Deaner and Dr. Burtner. 

The Financial Secretary presented the 
following report for the past year, which 
was adopted : 

INCOME. 

Boarding and Tuition, $5,850.75 

Music, etc., 103.75 

Art, 136.00 

College Day, 241.66 

Endowment Interest, 762.50 

Room Rent, 6.75 

Post-graduate, 25.00 

Rent for House, 120.00 

Donations, 81.98 

Old Account, 255.63 

Total, $8,184.02 

PAID OUT. 

Domestic Department, $1,741.12 

Teachers' Salaries, 3,670.00 

Insurance, 123.41 

College Association, 14.00 

Interest and Discounts, 1,205.97 

Old Claims, , 483.70 

Janitor's Services, 192.00 

Repairs, 206.00 

Steward's Salary, 340.00 

Traveling Expenses, 68.87 

Advertising, 35.00 

Postage, etc., 7.05 

Total, $8,087.12 

Balance in hand, 96.90 

Respectfully submitted, 
Isaac B. Haak, 

Financial Secretary. 

H. H. Kreider, the treasurer of the Col- 
lege, submitted his report, and it was 
approved. 

Balance in hand, $24.73 

Received during the year, 8,049.67 

$8,074.40 

Paid on orders , 8,074.40 

Respectfully submitted, 

H. H. Kreider, Treasurer. 



22 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Professor Deaner, the librarian of the 
College, made his report, which was 
adopted. There are now 3,200 volumes in 
the library, in addition to a large number 
of magazines, pamphlets, etc. The inter- 
est in this department is growing. 

President Bierman presented his annual 
report, in which he expresses gratitude to 
God for health enjoyed during the year, 
and for the successful work accomplished. 
There were one hundred and twelve stu- 
dents in attendance. The College came 
into possession of part of the Mrs. Dodge 
Scholarship Fund ($8,500) during the year, 
and also of five hundred dollars ($500) 
willed to the College Endowment Fund by 
the late Jonas Garber, of Lancaster county. 
The interest of these funds will materially 
assist us in carrying forward our work 
hereafter. The various departments of 
the College were considered, and their 
wants discussed. 

The following ladies and gentlemen 
were recommended for graduation : 

In Music: Misses Anna E. Wilson, 
Katie P. Mumma, and Mary C. Batdorf. 
Academic Course : Harry H. Sloat. 
Bachelor of Science : Misses Elvire C. 
Stehman and Minnie E. Weinman, and 
Messrs. Simon P. Bacastow, Horace W. 
Crider and Joseph G. W. Herold. 

Bachelor of Arts : Messrs. John L. 
Meyer and Samuel T. Mej^er. 

Master of Arts, in cursu : Rev. Syl- 
vester K. Wine, class of '82, of Chicago, 
Ohio ; Prof. William H. Kindt, class of 
'89, of Annville, Pa. 

Doctor of Philosophy, in Post-gradu- 
ate course : Rev. Isaac H. Albright, A. 
M., class of 1876, York, Pa.; RevrBenja- 
min F. Fritz, Union Biblical Seminary, 
class of '84, Greenwich, Ohio. 

Report s was received and various items 
referred to the proper standing committees. 

On motion the following were elected 
members of the Executive Committee for 
the coming year, viz.: Isaac H. Albright, 
A. H. Rice, H. H. Kreider, William H. 
Uhler, Isaac B. Haak, A. R. Forney and 
Cyrus F. Flook. President Bierman is 
member ex-officio of this committee. 

Henry H. Kreider was reelected treas- 
urer of the College. 

Isaac B. Haak was reelected financial 
agent for the year. Adjourned. 

Wednesday's session. 

The devotional exercises were conduc- 
ted this morning by Rev. Wm. H. Uhler. 



The Committee on Faculty recom- 
mended the reelection of the entire board 
of instruction, and the report was adopted. 
Miss Emma A. Dittmar's resignation as 
teacher of art was accepted. The Execu- 
tive Committee was instructed to supply 
the place. 

Jno. H. Maulfair was reelected steward 
of the College. 

The Auditing Committee reported that 
the accounts of the College were correctly 
kept, and the report was approved. 

The Committee on Endowment reported 
the following : 

assets. 

Josephine Bittinger Eberly Farm, . $40,000 

Bonds, notes, etc., 20,000 

Alumni Fund, 2,500 

$62^500 



,$8,500 



Mrs. Dodge Scholarship 

They also recommend that the cooper- 
ating Conferences make special efforts to 
raise the Endowment Fund to $100,000. 
Also that a more general observance of 
" College Day " be insisted upon by those 
in authority. 

A resolution was adopted that the hon- 
orary degree of Doctor of Divinity be 
conferred on the Rev. Charles T. Stearn 
of Chambersburg, Pa., and on the Rev. 
Ezekiel Light, editor of "Der Froeliche 
Botschafter" of Dayton, Ohio. 

The Committee on Grounds and Build- 
ings made an interesting report recom- 
mending the removal of several outbuild- 
ings and the transfer of a number of trees 
on the campus, and the report was adopted. 

H. H. Kreider, the treasurer, made a . 
statement relative to the purchase of addi- 
tional ground to the College campus, the 
amount of money, received on the same 
and how it was paid out, names of donors, 
etc., and the statement was ordered to be 
spread on the minutes. 

The Committee on Finance made the 
following report which was adopted, viz: 

I. We recommend that the Executive 
Committee be instructed to secure a 
financial agent who shall collect monej 
and attend to all the duties usually as- ( 
sociated with such office, and who is ^ 
enter upon his duties at as early a perio 
as possible. 

2. If the Executive Committee can 
any time during the ensuing year fi' lC ^ 
man whose ability for this work is u 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



23 



30 

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doubted and whose experience is ample, 
an d who has given evidence of success in 
the collection of money and in securing 
donations and bequests, and who may be 
w illin°" to serve the College for a number 
f years, then it shall be reported to the 
president of the Board of Trustees, who 
shall call a special meeting for the pur- 
pose of electing such agent at a stipulated 
salary for the time agreed upon. 
' 3. That S. W. Clippinger be appointed 
to secure a loan of five thousand ($5,000) 
dollars for the College. 

The Committee on Library and Appa- 
paratus recommended the purchase of a 
heliostat rotator, a mounted glass prism, 
a convex mirror, a specific gravity bal- 
ance and several other articles, and the 
report was adopted. 

The Board did all its business in less 
than two days, and its purpose is to make 
Lebanon Valley College what it ought to 
he, namely, first-class in all its appoint- 
, ments. Its members merit the thanks of 
the patrons and friends of the institution. 



General Hastings at Annville. 



Delivers an Address Before the Literary Exercises 
of Lebanon Valley Societies. 



MANY GOOD THOUGHTS ADVANCED. 



The College Chapel Crowded With Citizens From 
Annville and Lebanon — Speaker Introduced 
by William H. Kreider, President of the 
Meeting — The Address Abounds 
With Eloquent Passages and 
Hu-norous Sketches. 




From the Lebanon News. 

As per announcement Gen. D. H. Hast- 
ings appeared before the literary societies 
of Lebanon Yalley College last evening 
and delivered an address to them in the 
Chapel, which was well filled with stu- 
dents, citizens of Annville and a consider- 
able number from this city. Mr. William 
2- Kreider, son of H. H. Kreider, esq., 
*as presiding officer. The meeting was 
opened with a lady quartet singing by re- 
quest " Annie Laurie " with variations, an 
entirely new arrangement of the old popu- 
song. Mr. Kreider then in a neat 
?Peech introduced the speaker of the even- 
ts as the one who would be the leader in 
jhe campaign of 1894, the man who will 
5? the next Governor of the grand old 
Hvstone State. The introductory speech 



was w r ell received, and amid cheers and 
loud applause Gen. Hastings came forward 
and began his address. 

The speaker said he could not help but 
feel honored with the allusions the young 
presiding officer had made about himself, 
and briefly referred to the evidence of 
taste, culture and refinement he had met 
with at this institution of learning. His 
speech, he said, had no title : it is an or- 
phan wandering up and down the State, 
intended mainly for the benefit of young 
men and women. It is sometimes diffi- 
cult to know what to say to students, 
who for some years have been engaged in 
studying and reading and storing their 
minds with useful knowledge. The Ger- 
man statesman, Bismarck, once said, there 
is too much education in Germany and 
Russia ; too much higher culture and too 
few positions to be filled by the many 
who have prepared themselves for filling 
them, and this causes unrest and Social- 
ism. No utterance like that could have 
been truthfully been made in this country, 
where there are no classes, no distinction, 
and where all stand on the same level. 
This shows the difference in the forms of 
our government — ours by and from the 
people ; theirs from the single individual. 
There it is crowns, blood and royalty ; 
here it is moral worth and loyalty to the 
government. There seems to be some- 
thing in our very climate and soil that 
makes us a nation of freemen. Graduates 
live in a peculiar atmosphere. Behind 
them is the dreamy past, when they were 
cared for and nurtured ; soon you will be 
measured by a different standard, by cold 
and unfeeling business rules ; you will be 
gauged by what you accomplish your- 
selves, by what you are. There is no dis- 
tinction here but that which each one 
makes for himself. Opportunities also 
are afforded here that are not to be found 
in any other country. Founded on the 
rock of freedom, it* is far greater and 
better than any other ; there is more of 
everything and it is better. 

A' serious question to the young man 
entering life is : How are you going to 
fit yourself in some useful niche in this 
busy world? Whatever you may select, 
the question will arise, are you sure you 
are right, is it best suited to your taste 
and education? Opportunities for get- 
ting into position are not so numerous as 
forlnstance in such stirring times as dur- 
ing the Revolution or the Rebellion. In 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



that respect we are living in a mediocre 
period. No opportunities now for mili- 
tary men or statesmen as then existed. 
The great thought to be kept in mind is : 
Prepare yourself for the emergencies of 
the future. If they never come y ou have 
the benefit and satisfaction of having been 
ready. This is more a time of study and 
thought, and people do not follow leaders 
with a blind zeal as thej^ did years ago. 
The people are educated to think for 
themselves. If years ago men were taken 
from the professions — lawyers, doctors, 
and so on — now they are taken from 
among business men. It is not necessary 
to be a lawj-er, or doctor, or preacher, to 
do good; great men are found on the 
farm, in the mines and workshops, and 
among business men. Be sure you start 
right. Many a man is wrecked because 
he failed to start right. Better be a suc- 
cessful farmer than a bankrupt banker; 
better break stones and make an honest 
living than to be a preacher with no 
hearers, or a lawyer loafing around the 
Court House waiting for a chance to 
swindle his neighbors. This is an age of 
specialties. No one can prepare himself 
for all things. Have one purpose in view 
and prepare yourself well for that. 

Mankind may be divided into two 
classes, the worker and the loafer. The 
one is a curse, the other a blessing. Every 
day one works, the country is so much 
richer; every daj r he loafs, it is so much 
poorer. Everyone who possess anything 
has earned more than he expended. 
Young man, when will you begin to have 
a surplus? Let me impress these thoughts 
upon your mind : Support yourself. Live 
honestly and render to every man his due. 
No man can live to himself. Really 
speaking there are no classes in this 
country. The so-called common people 
are the conservative power of this coun- 
try, the class upon which this country en- 
tirely depends for all its needs, the class 
which sprang to the country's call in 1861. 
Spencer's human vegetation — a class 
found in Europe which is born, lives a 
short time and then disappears; which 
exerts no force or influence — is unknown 
in this country. The speaker here turned 
about and said : I am sorry there is not a 
flag in this room on this day. He then 
gave a brief history of Betsy Ross, and 
paid an eloquent tribute to the Stars and 
Stripes, the emblem of this country, the 
emblem of true manhood, of loj'alty and 



patriotism — the emblem that stands f 0r 
the American Christian Sabbath. 

In conclusion : Prepare for the emer- 
gencies of this country ; you are the kind 
of people the country needs ; 3 r ou belong 
to the class from which the great men 
have always been taken. Lincoln came 
from that class; John Marshall, the first 
Chief Justice ; General Grant, the Illinois 
tanner, and his lieutenants, Sherman and 
Sheridan, the son of an Irish laborer, and 
many others. Make use of the capabili. 
ties Gocl has given } t ou ; take advantage 
of the opportunities afforded. He was 
a good man, a good citizen, a good 
neighbor, is the best monument anyone 
can have. There are no classes here. 
We are all a common people, having a 
common object, a common patriotism, a 
common Bible, a common brotherhood 
of peace and joy. 

For one hour the speaker held the at- 
tention of his audience closely. His lead- 
ing thoughts were impressed with strong 
illustrations. Many of his passages were 
really eloquent and he was frequently 
heartily applauded. There was just enough 
humor to keep everybody in a good mood 
all the way through. Gen. Hastings is a 
man of commanding presence on the plat- 
form. He has an excellent physique, and 
his manner of speaking is cool, dignified 
and measured. After his address he was 
heartily greeted by his numerous admirers 
in this city and Annville. 

The Junior Banquet. 

On Saturday evening, June 10, oc- 
curred an event the first of its kind in the 
history of Lebanon Valley College. A 
banquet was given by the Juniors in honor 
of the Seniors. Seniors and Juniors met 
at the Ladies' Building, where they were 
received by Mr. Huber and Miss Saylor, 
who acted as host and hostess. All then 
repaired to the parlor of the Eagle Hotel 
After a short time, during which social 
games of various kinds were indulged ity 
the party was directed to a bountiful re- 
past, which contained a variety of t ue 
delicacies of the season, and which r e ' 
fleeted great credit upon those who h*" 
provided it. , 

After all were comfortably seated 
around the table, D. S. Eshleman, J 
Toastmaster, in a few appropriate wotfw 
extended a cordial welcome to the class 
'93, to which S. P. Backastoe, as represen- 
tative for the Seniors, responded. 



•r 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



25 



en 



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ted 
94, 
rd» 
ss of 
esen- 



Toasts were then responded to by the 
bllowing persons : " A Retrospect," by 
g T. Meyer, '93 ; " The Future," by H. 
H Sloat,*'93; " Our Alma Mater," by J. 
a W. Herold, '93, and "The Class of 
'93," by S. F. Huber, '94. 

After the banquet games and social con- 
versation again formed the order of exer- 
cises for some time, after which the board- 
ing students returned to the College and 
the day students to their respective homes. 
The occasion was a delightful one for all 
present and indicated friendly relations 
between the classes. 

At a time when society has attained 
such an advanced state of progress as at 
the present, the barbarism practised by 
the different classes of some of our Ameri- 
can institutions of learning, is a disgrace 
to our advanced state of civilization. 

On this occasion, the classes of '93 and 
'94 of Lebanon Yalley College showed 
that they have risen far above such silli- 
ness, and that they are capable of enter- 
taining such feelings toward one another 
as are creditable to a Christian institution 
of learning, to members of College classes 
and to ladies and gentlemen. 



War and International Arbitration. 



Nature has implanted within man the 
ambition to succeed in the work of life. 
This ambition, bj r reason of conflicting 
interests, frequently involves him in con- 
troversies with his fellowman. What is 
true of individuals is equally true of na- 
tions. The ambition for glorj^, the desire 
to hold a high position among the nations 
of i he world, is universal. It is the desire 
of the weakest, as well as of the most 
powerful nations. 

The struggle for supremacy has already 
Jed to a diversity of conflicting claims, and 
is still continually producing disputes, for 
^hicli some means of settlement must be 
provided. What these means shall be is 
the question which presents itself for solu- 
* 10 n. Shall it be war or arbitration ? 

comparison of the two, taken from 
history, must result overwhelmingly in 
&vor of the latter. It is unnecessary to 
ref er to the terrible destruction of life and 
F°perty,and the general ruin, occasioned 
the ravages of war. These are indeed 
]! ei ghty arguments against it ; but in past 
lm es they were undoubtedly less so than 
J 1 Present. The grandest struggles of his- 
0r 3'— Judaism against Paganism, Greek 

h 



Civilization against Persian Barbarism, 
Christianity against Mohammedanism, 
Royal Authority against Feudalism, Pro- 
testantism against Catholicism, and Free- 
dom against Despotism — while they were 
achieved at a terrible cost of life and 
treasure, yet the sacrifice, terrible as it 
may seem, was demanded by the interests 
of humanity. 

Nevertheless, if the state of civilization 
rendered such violent remedies necessary 
in past ages, we are not in need of them 
to-da} r . Civilization has reached a higher 
plane than it ever before attained, and 
arbitration, as we shall attempt to show, 
will fully answer the needs of modern 
times. After all the terrible ravages of 
war, its most ardent advocate must admit 
that it is largely a failure. It must neces- 
sarily fail for one of the disputants. Us- 
ually it fails for both, neither accomplish- 
ing his ends. 

And what losses, in addition to this 
failure, it brings upon the contending 
parties ! High military authority tells us 
that " A war, in order to be just, must be 
undertaken either to repel an inj ury or to 
secure a righteous demand." But the 
question arises, who shall determine whe- 
ther national disputes are of such a char- 
acter or not ? In case of war, each nation 
decides this question for itself. But is 
this just? In our courts the judge must 
be a disinterested person : should not 
disinterested persons likewise be the arbi- 
ters of national disputes ? War does not 
properly distribute punishment. It often 
makes innocence the heavier sufferer. It 
legalizes might as right, fails to remove 
the cause of disputes, leaves a pretext for 
future wars, and is dictated by passion 
instead of reason. 

Can we then regard it as satisfactory ? 
Let us now consider arbitration. This 
means of settlement is based upon justice, 
economy and humanity. It is not an en- 
tirely new scheme. It has alreay been 
tried in some form among all nations. In 
early times kings and chiefs acted as arbi- 
ters between their subjects in their indi- 
vidual disputes. As society progressed 
more perfect means of arbitration were 
devised, until the courts of the present 
day, with their various gradations, have 
come into existence and have wellnigh 
ended the reign of force among individuals. 
The Supreme Court of the nation settles 
interstate difficulties. Increasing civiliza- 
tion has gradually extended the principle 



2G 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



of arbitration. Why not take one step 
farther in advance, extend it to the settle- 
ment of national disputes, and add an- 
other laurel to the civilization of the 
nineteenth century ? In the settlement 
of national differences arbitration has, 
wherever tried, given perfect satisfaction. 
The dispute with reference to the Alabama 
Claims would have produced a terrible 
war between Great Britain and the United 
States if the difficulty had not been ad- 
justed b}' arbitration. Each nation would 
have expended a far greater sum of money 
than was involved in the claim, slaughtered 
thousands of men, crippled as many more 
for life, rather than yield to the demands 
of the other. Yet terms which neither 
would have received from the other were 
willingly accepted by both at the decision 
of the arbiters. The dispute was settled, 
no lives were lost, and comparatively little 
expense incurred. 

What better settlement could be de- 
sired ? "Arbitration is excellent in theory, 
but will fail in practice," say its opponents. 
Nevertheless, various plans of arbitration 
have been suggested, which we believe 
could not fail of success, if given a fair 
trial. The following plan is a combina- 
tion of several plans proposed by able 
advocates of arbitration. This plan is, 
that the nations accepting the principle 
form an International Arbitration Court, 
to be composed of members appointed by 
the legislatures of the various nations to 
be represented ; the com't itself niay de- 
termine its place of sitting. The whole 
court need not be assembled in order to 
transact business. Any portion of it, as 
the court may determine, may be given 
full authority to arbitrate disputes. The 
disputants, however, may appeal to the 
entire court, its decision to be final ; but 
the representatives of disputing nations 
can have no voice in matters concerning 
their respective governments. 

The proper authorities of interested na- 
tions shall be well informed by the court 
with reference to the development of facts 
which have led to its decision. Any na- 
tion disregarding the decisions of the 
court can be deprived of its representation 
there, the ports of the remaining nations 
may be closed against the offender, all 
commercial intercourse with him pro- 
hibited, any of his property in the posses- 
sion of the represented nations confiscated, 
until the decisions of the court are com- 
plied with. 



Place men of lofty character in such a 
court, and very little dissatisfaction with 
its decisions will be manifested. And 
should there be dissatisfaction, no wa| 
will result, for no nation can prosper when 
deprived of all intercourse with other na- 
tions ; neither can one nation resist such 
a combination. Too great a degree of 
success should not at first be expected- 
all reforms have had modest beginnings 
and experience in this case, as in all 
others, would soon prove an able teacher. 
Doubtless it would be necessary that 
some system of representation should be 
determined upon and many minor details 
arranged before such a plan could he 
adopted. But further argument is un- 
necessary. Some successful plan of arbi- 
tration can easily be adopted if once na- 
tions are inclined to do so. It has been 
well said that " Nations agree upon rules 
and regulations of Avar, and can the}- not 
equally well agree upon means of preserv- 
ing peace ?" Does not reason compel us 
to admit that " arbitration is the wisest, 
most economical and humane method of 
settling national differences?" — wisest in, 
that it promotes justice, most economical 
in that it saves the countless millions re- 
quired by war, most humane in that it 
averts the terrible destruction of human 
life. 

We do not by any means believe that 
arbitration would end all international 
broils. Our most stringent laws some- 
times fail to prevent violence, yet we do 
not advocate anarchy as a proper regula- 
tion for society. Neither should we reject 
the principle of arbitration, though some 
half-civilized nation should refuse to listen 
to the voice of reason. Arbitration is one 
of the great reforms which the present 
demands. The nation that leads in this 
movement will place herself at the head of 
modern civilization. What position sba| 
our own glorious nation assume ? Shall 
she continue to worship at the bloody 
shrine of Mars, upon whose altar millio" 8 
of human victims have already been sacri- 
ficed, or shall she become the champion 



among the advocates of peace . 
question must be answered by the voteso 
her patriotic citizens. Therefore, let tM 
friends of arbitration be aroused ; «* 
them be active and zealous in advocating 
the cause of the Prohibition party: ^ 
them step boldly into the arena of con _. 
hurl war from the throne which he has 
long and so defiantly occupied, and co 



? This 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



•27 



11 

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tend manfully for the cause of justice ; 
nd may they * nus con ti'ibute their full 
share toward hastening that grand and 
irlorious epoch when might must submit 
to right, when a Christian spirit shall be 
exercised in the settlement of national 
disputes, and when peace shall reign over 
all the earth. 0. E. Good, '94. 

Pennsylvania Chautauqua. 

Believing it may be of interest to our 
readers we give the programme of Public 
Entertainments of Pennsylvania Chau- 
tauqua at Mt. Gretna, Pa. Manj T of our 
readers doubtless will attend. A grand 
opportunity is given at a minimum price, 
SI. 00 a week or $3.50 for season. 

June 29. — Opening Day. — 10 a.m., Con- 
cert by Perseverance Band; 3 p. m., 
Opening Exercises, with addresses by the 
Chancellor, President and others; 8 p. 
m.. Address by Dr. E. J. James, of the 
University of Pennsylvania. 

July 30. — 10 a. m., Perseverance Or- 
chestra; p. m.,the "Boston Stars;" 8 p. m., 
best musical and other talent of Harris- 
burg. 

July 1. — 10 a. in., " Hygiene," by Dr. 
M. Gr. Motter; 3 p. m., the "Boston 
Stars ;■' 8 p. m., " Before the Mast," by 
Win. M. Breslin, Esq. 

July 3. — 10 a. m., Officers' Reception ; 
3 p.m., Rev. Theo. E. Schmauk; 8 p. m., 
" Power Through Repose and Activity, " 
by Miss Lyclia J. Newcomb. 

July 4. — Independence Day. — Iroquois 
Band ; patriotic choral singing ; devo- 
tional exercises ; reading the Declaration 
of Independence; address by Governor 
Pattison ; Iroquois Band ; phonographic 
entertainment ; oration by Hon. Chas. A. 
Stone ; addresses by Hon. M. Brosius, 
Hon. W. IT. Hensel ; grand illumination 
of the grounds ; patriotic singing and 
Persevrance Band. 

July 5.— Band; 10:30 a. m., Dr. Willis 
{• Beecher ; 3 p. m., Hon. S. J. McCarrel; 
PP- m., Dr. R, E. Thompson. 

July 6.— Band; 10:30 a. m., Dr. G. T. 
Utinger; 3 p. m., Dr. R. E. Thompson; 
£P- m., " The Voice," by Miss Lydia J. 
• Ne ^comb. 

July 7.—W. C. T. IT. Day.— Music; 
Umference of Workers, with address by 
State President, Mrs. Anna M. Hammer ; 
jLPj m., addresses by Mrs. Hammer, Mrs. 
ele n Gougar, Mrs. Rebecca Chambers 
1(1 others; 8 p. m., Bell Ringers' Con- 



cert and Legerdemain Entertainment by 
Messrs Ransom and Robertson. 

July 8.— Band ; 10:30 a. m., Rev. M. H. 
Williams; 3 p. m., Ransom-Robertson 
Entertainment; 8 p. m., Bible reading by 
Dr. Willis J. Beecher. 

July 10-15.— Teachers' Week.— Two 
full concerts by Thorbahn's Orchestra 
every day. 

July 10— Orchestral Concert; 10:30a. 
m., Superintendent McGinnes ; 3 p. m., 
Dr. G. M. Philips; 8 p. m., Miss New- 
comb, " Dress." 

July 11.— Concert; 10:30 a. m., Bible 
reading by Dr. Beecher; 3 p. m., State 
Superintendent N. C. Schaeffer; 8 p. m., 
Dr. G. M. Philips. 

July 12.— Orchestra ; 10:30 a. m., Su- 
perintendent McNeal ; 3 p. m., "Colum- 
bus," with rare charts and maps, by John 
Fiske; 8 p. m., Dr. N. C. Schaeffer. 

July 13.— Concert ; 10:30 a. m., Dr. E. 
O. Lyte ; 3 p. m., " Yespucius," by John 
Fiske ; 8 p. m.,Euterpean Mandolin Club. 

July 14.—" Brotherhood Day."— Hum- 
melstown Band ; 10:30 a. m., Superinten- 
dent M. J. Brecht; Convention of Broth- 
erhood of Andrew and Philip, with 
addresses by prominent speakers, field 
sports, etc., afternoon and evening. 

July 15. — Orchestra; 10:30 a. m., 
" Foods," by Dr. Adelaide M. Underwood ; 
3 p. m., Mecklem Harp and Saxophone 
Concert; 8p.m., "Some First Steps in 
Human Progress," by Dr. Fred'k. Starr. 

July 17. — Pennsvlvania German Day. — 
Band; 10:30 a. m., Dr. Starr on " Race 
Characteristics of the Pennsylvania Ger- 
man," with measurement and photograph- 
ing of types, etc. ; 3 p. m., Col. T. C. 
Zimmerman ; 7:30 p. m., " Men and Things 
at the World's Fair," by Dr. Starr ; 8 p. 
m., Piano Recital by Mr. D. Crozier, as- 
sisted by Mrs. Chas. HorTmeier in vocal 
selections. 

July 18.-10:30 a. m.. Dr. Thompson; 
3 p. m., " Scott Recital," readings and 
impersonations by Prof, and Mrs. John 
R. Scott; 7:30 p. m., Dr. Starr on the 
World's Fair; 8 p. m., "Ancient Rome 
and the Cresars," illustrated, by Percy M. 

July 19. — Recognition Day.— Band ; 
10:30 a. m., Dr. Thompson; 3 p. m., 
Recognition Day exercises, with address 
by Bev. H. Pardoe, Dr. Jas. Morrow and 
others; 7:30 p. in., Dr. Starr on the 
World's Fair; 8 p.m., "Christian Romeancl 
the Catacombs," illustrated, by Mr. Reese. 



1 



« 



28 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



July 20. — Christian Endeavor Day. — 
Band; District Convention of Y. P. S. 
C. E., with addresses, music, etc., presided 
over by State President Rev. Chas. 
Rhoads; 1:30 p. m., Dr. Starr on the 
World's Fair; 8 p. m., " Medieval Rome 
and St. Peter's," illustrated, by Mr. Reese. 

July 21. — Lebanon Alumni Day. — Or- 
chestra ; 10-30 a. m., Dr. Ettinger ; 3 p. m., 
piano recital by Mr. Crozier, assisted by 
Miss Marguerite Potts, soprano ; 4:30 p. 
m.,Dr. Starr on the World's Fair; 7:30 
p. m., Alumni Day exercises of Lebanon 
High School Alumni. 

July 22.— Band ; 10:30 a. m., Dr. Starr 
on the World's Fair; 3 p. m., "Some 
Steps in Human Progress," by Dr. Starr; 
8 p. m., " Scott Recital." 

July 24.-10:30 a. m., Prof. W. J. Balt- 
zell ; 3 p. m., Dr. Starr on the World's 
Fair ; 8 p. m., " Steps in Human Pro- 
gress," by Dr. Starr. 

July 25. — 10:30 a. m., Kindergarten 
Work, with exercises, by Miss S. K. Lip- 
pincott; 3 p.m., Luttman Swedish Sex- 
tette; 4:30 p. m., Dr. Starr on the World's 
Fair; 8 p. m., "Steps in Human Pro- 
gress," by Dr. Starr. 

July 26.-10:30 a. m., Dr. Starr on 
" Steps in Human Progress," illustrated ; 
3 p. m., Swedish Sextette; 1:30 p. m., Dr. 
Starr on the World's Fair; 8 p. m., "The 
Oarden of Eden of To-day," by George 
Donaldson, assisted by Mrs. Donaldson, 
with illustrative costumes, etc. 

July 21.— Band ; 10:30 a. m., " Sights 
and Scenes on a Trip from Persia to 
Japan," by Mr. and Mrs. Donaldson; 3 p. 
m., Swedish Sextette ; 1;30 p. m., Dr. Starr 
on the World's Fair; 8 p. m., Farewell 
Exercises. 



of Dayton, Ohio. Mr. Light is a sound 
theologian, an accurate scholar, and an 
able writer, and the institution in honoring 
him no less honors itself. Hereafter | 
will be the Rev. Ezekiel Light, D. D.,and 
we tender our congratulations. — Lebanon 
Courier. 



Honored. 

Among the degrees conferred by Leb- 
anon Yalley College at its recent com- 
mencement was that of Doctor of Divinity 
upon Rev. C. T. Stearn, the able and ener- 
getic pastor of the First TJ. B. Church 
•of this place. — Chambersburg Public 
Opinion. 

A Well-Merited Honor. 

It will be noticed in our account of the 
commencement exercises of Lebanon Yal- 
ley College that the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon 
the Rev. Ezekiel Light, the recently 
elected editor of the Froeliche Botschafter, 



Athletics. 

WILL H. KREIDER, '94. 

Athletic sports at colleges are consid- 
ered by some colleges as a ruination to 
student life. This once all prevailing 
idea is being recorded in the annals of 
history as a thing of the past, and our 
games are becoming more popular each 
year. Such is the case at the L. V. C. 
The students are beginning to see into the 
wise words quoted from Lord Bacon : "To 
cultivate our mental faculties and to neg- 
lect the physical condition of our body is 
a poor education." 

During the past year intense interest 
has been manifested in our games. Two 
beautiful tennis courts have been con- 
structed and a tennis club of twenty 
members has been organized. 

A beautiful croquet ground has been 
made on the east side of the main build- 
ing. In the new addition to the campus 
one of the finest ball grounds in the 
country has been constructed. The dia- 
mond is scraped, and all the latest rules 
in regard to the ground have been pro- 
vided. 

The financial support which the base 
ball club has received, was excellent, al- 
though it was not what it should have 
been on account of the heav} r expenses of 
the club. The club won the champion- 
ship of the Schuylkill Seminary. This is 
the third year she holds the champion- 
ship, hence she is to be congratulated on 
her success. The club lost one game, the 
reason being lack of practice in fielding' 
The club as a whole has done excellent 
batting, and this accounts for the winning 
of a number of the games. In some o 
the games the fielding was of a high orW 
while in other games it was the oppos )te ' 

L. Y. C. should be able to put a stron» 
foot ball team in the field next fall. 
material is here, and all we need is som 
one to train this material, which I h°l 
can be accomplished. ^ 

The following are the scores ot 
principal games played this season: 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



29 



L . v. C. VS. SCHUYLKILL SEMINARY. 

May 20, at Anriville. 



SCHUYLKILL SEM. 
D R H O A E 

2 1 1 10 
3 
1 3 



Maimer, p 
Kobn, 3b. ^ 
Krecker, ss...i 
M cHose.2b...l 
Stanford, c... J 
Huber, 

Kelchner lb. 2 



2 

4 3 



1 
1 4 
1 
2 



.2 



L. V. C. 
R H 

Sperrow, c....l 

Sloa*,3b 

Sheffey,2b....l 

Crider, p 3 5 

Gable, cf 3 

Brightbi]l,lb.2 2 11 

Henry, If. 2 10 1 

Herr, rf 2 

Bair, SS 



O A E 

5 
2 2 4 
5 2 1 
8 
1 
1 

1 
i 



Sanders, ss ..1 
Total 15 8 24 12 12 



Total 12 7 27 16 12 

^IkiU _Seminary. ::::; .0 | 1 7 0-12 

Famed runs— Sch. Sem., 2; L. V. C. 7. Home run 
Prifler Three-base bits— Crider, McHose. Two- 
kow hits— Brigbtbill, 2; Crider. S:olen bases— Sch. 
S 7- L. V. C, 12. Double plays-Sheffey to 
RrHitbill, 2. Struck out— Crider, 4; Walmer, 7. 
Passe i balls— Sperrow, 3; Stanford, 4. Left on bases 
_L. V C, 2; Sch. Sem., 7. Umpire— Longsdorf. 
Time of game— 1:59. 



L. V. C. VS. SCHUYLKILL SEMINARY. 

Mar 27, at Fredericksburg, Pa. 



L. V. C. 

R 

Sperrow, c . . . 2 

Sloat, 3b 5 

Sleichter, ss..4 
Crider, p. .,'..4 

Gable, cf 2 

Waltz, lb 1 

Sheffey, 2b.... 1 
Henry, If. ....0 
Huber, rf 



OAS 

3 10 

3 2 1 

3 3 

8 



7 

6 11 

2 

13 



SCHUYLKILL SEM. 

R H O 

McIIose,2b, p.5 2 3 



A E 

7 1 



Walmer, p, It. 4 3 3 8 

Mohn,3b 5 2 2 1 2 

Kelchner, lb. .2 1 14 1 

Stanfd, c. 2b..O 13 2 

Deck, If, C...1 1 1 1 

Sellers, cf 2 1 1 

Krecker, ss...2 10 2 

Huber, rf 5 2 1 

Total .19 19 24 13 8 Total 26 13 27 20 7 

LV. C 5 7 3 3 1 0—19 

Schuyikill Seminary 3 2 7 4 5 2 3 x— 26 

Earned runs— L. V. C, 2. Two-base bits— Kelch- 
ner. Stolen bases— L. V. C, 13; Sch. Sem., 7. Bases 
on balls— L. V. C, 7; Sch. Sem., 5. Struck out— Cri- 
der^; Walmer, 3. Passed balls— Stanford, 8; Sper- 
row, 3. Hit by pitched ball— Sloat. Double plays— 
Shelley to Waltz; Sheffey. Wild pitches— Crider, 2. 
Umpire— Longsdorf. Time of game— 2: L0. 

CHAMPIONSHIP GAME. 

L. V. C. VS. SCHUYLKILL SEMINARY. 



June 3, at Annville. 



SCHUYLKILL SEM. 

II r, R H O A E 

McHose, 2b.. 113 10 

"aimer, p....i \ in 2 

M °bn, 3b 2 12 2 

kelchner, lb..l 1 8 

S&nford, c...i o 10 

Strauss, If .. i 2 1 

S ub «\ rl o 

pecker, ss... 4 

Sell ers,cf o 

Total. 



7 6 25 13 8 



L. V. C. 

R H O A E 

Sperrow, c I 16 

Sheffev,2b....2 2 5 

Lauser, p 1 13 9 

Crider, cf 1 2 3 1 

Henry, If 1 1 1 

Sleichter, ss..O 2 5 3 

Herr, rf 1 

Brightbill.lb.l 16 2 

Sloat, 3b 1 2 114 

Total 8 10 27 18 8 



? ch ujikill Semi nary 1 1 2 3 0—7 

^•C (j 2 1 1 3 1-8* 

Earned runs-L V. C, 2; Sch. Sem., 1. Stolen 
ter i v - c -< 13 ! Scn - Sem - 5 - Triple play— Sleich- 
Sh P fT u 'ider to Sheffey. Double play— Sliechter to 
I ^"7. Hit by pitched ball— Mohn. Struck out— 
Cim r ' 6; Calmer, 6. Bases on balls-Lauser, 2; 

a mer 2. Passed balls— Stanford, 4; Sperrow. 4. 
ait lL T °n bases— L. V. C-, 8; Sch. Sem., 8. Sacrifice 
139? user - Umpire— Longsdorf. Time of game— 

*°Wy one man out. 



L. V. C. VS. DERRY. 

June 3, at Annville. 



DERRT. 

R H O 

Yingst, lb....l 2 

Peffer,ct 1 1 

W.Weltm'r.lfl 

D. Moyer, 2b.. 111 

A.Weltm'r,3b0 10 

Shirk, c.ss.... 1 18 1 

M. Moyer, rf. .0 1 

Z'm'r'n,ss, c.O 1612 

Sanders, p.... 1 3 11 



8 3 
1 



l. v. c. 

Sperr'w, c, cf.3 13 

Sheffey, 2b.... 5 4 2 1 1 

Lauser, lb... 4 4 12 1 

Crider, p 1 2 1 9 

Henry, If 1 1 

Sleichter, ss..l 1 

Herr, rf 1 2 1 1 

Brightbill,3b.2 12 4 1 

Sloat, cf, C...2 2 6 2 



Total.. 4 6 27 13 9 Total 20 1 7 27 1 8 3 

Derry 4 0—4 

L. V. C 2 1 1 4 1 9 2—20 

Earned runs— L. V. C., 6. Home runs— Lauser. 
Three-base hit— Crider. Stolen bases— L. V. C, 11; 
Derry, 1. Double plays— Lauser to Brightbill; Shef- 
fey to Brigbtbill; Sanders to A. Weltmer. Struck 
out— Crider, 6; Sanders, 5. Bases on balls— Crider, 
6; Sanders, 3. Passed balls— Sperrow, 3: Sloat, 1; 
Shirk, 4; Zimmerman, 2. Hit by pitched ball— Shef- 
fey, Peffer. Left on basts— L. V. C, 9; Derry, 6. 
Umpire— Shenk. Time of game— 1:55. 



State Inter-collegiate Prohibition As- 
sociation. 

Representatives of the Prohibition clubs 
of the various colleges of the State, met 
in convention at Harrisburg, June 6, for 
the purpose of forming a permanent or- 
ganization. Mr. Ernest, of Pennsylvania 
College, Gettysburg, who has accepted 
the presidency of the Association, pre- 
sided. The following officers w r ere then 
elected : Mr. Colestock, of Bucknell Uni- 
versity, Lewisburg,w T as chosen Vice Presi- 
dent; Mr.Baily, of Wyoming Seminary, 
Kingston, Secretary, and Mr. Messier, of 
Dickinson College, Carlisle, Treasurer. A 
constitution was next adopted. 

Among the prominent features of the 
Association are the students' oratorical 
contests and the lecture bureau. 

The object of the former is to agitate 
the cause of Prohibition among the stu- 
dents of our colleges, and that of the lat- 
ter is to secure able and active college 
men who will take the lecture field and 
endeavor to spread a Prohibition senti- 
ment among the people of our State. 

The convention was an enthusiastic 
one ; and after all business was transacted 
the meeting was thrown open for all pres- 
ent to participate. Remarks were then 
made by some of the prominent Prohibi- 
tionists present. In the evening the State 
oratorical contest was held. The Court 
House was filled with a very enthusiastic 
audience. The occasion was enlivened by 
excellent music furnished by Mr. and Mrs. 
Bailey, of Minnesota ; the Williamsport 
Quartet, and one of the Harrisburg bands. 



so 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



Each of the contestants did very well, 
and it required careful discrimination on 
the part of the judges to decide who 
should be the National contestant for the 
Keystone State. The report of the j udges 
showed that they considered the oration 
by Mr. Connelly , of Dickinson Collegers 
worthy of first place, and that of Mr. 
Colestock, of Bucknell University, the 
second place. 

0. E. Good was our representative at 
the contest. As far as thought and com- 
position are concerned his oration was 
equal to that of any of the other contest- 
ants. His effort reflected credit upon him- 
self as well as the institution which he rep- 
resented. The general verdict was that 
■our first State contest was a decided suc- 
cess. 

Xtterar^ Societies, 

Philokosmiaii Literary Society. 

Esse Quam Videri. 

Another year of our college life has 
passed into history. We, as a society, 
met for the last time in regular session 
on Friday evening, June 9th. 

The programme consisted of extempo- 
raneous addresses. Some of the thoughts 
expressed were humorous, while others 
were of a more solid character. 

The Seniors took their leave of the so- 
ciety with some veiy appropriate and im- 
pressive remarks. All seemed loathe to 
leave us, and were profuse in their wishes 
for our future success. We shall miss 
them greatly. Duties which they per- 
formed will now devolve upon those of us 
who remain. 

And the loss of these members reminds 
us of the fact that we must endeavor to 
secure new members, in order that we 
may maintain that activity and enterprise 
which has always been characteristic of 
the society. 

J. H. Maj^silles was chosen to fill the 
place on the editorial staff vacated by H. 
W. Crider. The other editors remain un- 
changed. Among the visitors present at 
our last few sessions were Profs. Shott 
and Lehman, Misses Sleichter, Flint, 
Dittmar, Reist, Spayd, Sherrick, Strick- 
ler, Stehman, Pennypacker and C linger, 
Messrs. Warren and Howard Henry, 
Hoverter and Ilomig, of Allentown. Mr. 
Romig is an ex-member. He was a dele- 
gate to the Sunday-school Convention 




which convened at Lebanon, and takincr 
advantage of his opportunity, he callejj 
to see us and gave us some very encour. 
aging remarks. 

Messrs. Hartman, Huber and Good wen 
among the delegates to the State Prolii. 
bition Convention of College Clubs. 

The Convention met at Harrisburg 
June 6. Among our ex-members who 
were present at the commencement exer- 
cises, we were pleased to see the smilina 
countenances of Messrs. A. R. and $ 
A. Kreider, H. TJ. and H. B. Roop, Owen, 
Herr, Washinger, Hain, Backenstoe, Enck, 
Harp, Flook, Daugkert}?-, Kleffman, Keller, 
Miller and others. 

Such a representation of ex-Philos in- 
dicates that our ex-members have neither 
forgotten us nor the College, and this is a 
source of encouragement to us as students 
and as Philokosmians. 

"College Day" Collections. 

EAST PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE. 

East Harrisburg (1892), $3 66 

Shaefferstown (1892), 50 

Paradise, 16 46 

Litiz 2 50 

Lancaster, 6 51 

Steelton, 4 00 

Mountville, 20 06 

Annville, 40 81 

Lebanon, 9 95 

$ioTli 

PENNSYLVANIA CONFERENCE. 

Manchester (1892), $3 00 

Salem, Baltimore (1892), 38 oS 

Dallastown (1892), 5 00 

Fifth Church, Baltimore, 4 o 

Shippensburg, ^ oO 

Shoop's Station, 8 f 

Second Church, York 1° J 

New Cumberland, ^ 

Salem, Baltimore (1893), 40 00 

Mechanicsburg, ^ ' 

TT 3 00 

Hanover, 

First Church, York, 1° J 

Scott Street, Baltimore, ^ j| 

Waynesboro, J ^ 

Duncannon, 

$15T W 

EAST GERMAN CONFERENCE. 

Myerst S,::::::;::::::::-:::J 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



31 



kin* 
ailed 

were 
rohi. 

burg, 
who 
exer- 

lilillcr 

d i 

)wen, 
Enek, 
lellei, 

os in- 
either 
is is a 
idents 



16 « 
2 50 
6 51 
4 00 
20 00 
40 81 
9 95 

ioTTs 







L -}1BERLAND VALLEY 11 AILROAD. 
TIME TABLE-Dec. 18, 1892. 



T V Winchester 

..' Martin- burg . ... 

ii Hagerstown 

H Greencastle 

ii ctiambersburg .. 

" SWppensburg 

Newvi le 

» Carlisle 

■I Mechaniosburg., 
^r. Dillsburg 

" Harrisburg 



Philadelphia.. 

New York 

Baltimore 



C'bg | Ky'e Mr'g Day Ev'g N'gt 
Acc. I Exp Mail Exp Mail I Exp 



No.12 No. 2 No. 4 No. 6 No. 8 No.lO 



6 15 
6 35 

6 55 

7 20 
7 44 



A. M. 

6 20 

7 03 

7 42 

8 06 
8 30 

8 52 

9 12 
9 35 

10 00 



8 05 I 10 20 



1 25 
4 00 
1 25 



8 25 
'902 



1 25 
4 00 
1 25 



11 45 

12 09 
12 32 
12 53 

1 10 

1 35 
12 55 

4 43 

2 18 

6 50 
9 35 
6 45 

P. M. 



P. M. 

2 20 

3 10 

4 00 

4 26 

5 06 
5 20 

5 41 

6 07 

6 34 

7 05 
715 

10 55 
3 50 
10 40 
P. M. 



P. M. 

500 
7 10 
10 05 
10 25 

10 46 

11 07 
11 27 

11 45 

12 04 

12 20 

A. M. 

4 25 
7 10 
6 20 

AM. 



Additional trains will leave Carlisle daily except Sunday at 
5.55 a. m.. 12:30 p. m., 3:45 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations, arriving at Harrisburg at 6:40 a. m., 1:15 p. m., 4:33 
p. m. 

Evening Mail runs daily between Harrisburg and Cham- 
bersburg. 



Up Trains. 



Lv. Baltimore 

" New York .. .. 
" Philadelphia.. 



" Harrisburg 

» Dillsburg 

* Mechanicsburg . 

" Carlisle 

" Newviile 

" Shippensburg.... 
" Chambersburg.. 

" Greencastle 

" Hagerstown 

" Martinsburg 

Ar. Winchester 



Win 


Me's 


Hag 


Ev'g 


C'bg 


N. O. 


Acc. 


Exp 


ACC. 


Mail 


Acc. 


Exp 


No. 1 


No. 3 


No. 5 


No. 7 


No.19 


No. 9 


P. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


11 30 


4 45 


8 53 


11 20 


4 25 


4 25 


8 00 


12 15 




9 00 


200 


5 00 


11 20 


4 30 


8 50 


11 40 


4 35 


7 40 


A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


612 


7 55 


12 30 


3 45 


8 00 


10 25 




715 


12 10 




8 10 




627 


8 11 


12 51 


4 06 


8 20 


10 41 


6 57 


8 31 


1 15 


4 30 


8 44 


10 58 


7 21 


8 53 


1 42 


4 55 


9 08 


11 14 


7 40 


9 15 


2 02 


5 16 


9 29 


11 38 


8 03 


9 40 


2 30 


5 42 


9 50 


11 29 


8 24 


10 10 


2 52 


6 03 




11 47 


8 55 


10 20 


3 15 


6 30 




12 25 


9 40 






712 






10 30 






8 00 






A. M. 


A. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


P. M. 


A. M. 



Additional trains will leave Harrisburg daily except Sunday 
at 8:25 a. m., 10:35 a. m.. 5:15 p. m., arriving at Carlisle at 9:10 
a. m., 11:20 a. m., 6:00 p. m., stopping at all intermediate 
stations; on Saturday additional train will leave Harrisburg 
at 6:20 p. m., arriving at Mechanicsburg 6:41 p. m., stopping 
at all intermediate stations. 

Pullman Palace Sleeping Cars between Hagerstown and New 
York on Keystone Express and Night Express east, and on 
Memphis Express and New Orleans Express w< st. 

Pullman Sleeping Cars on Night Express and New Orleans 
Express between Philadelphia and New Orleans. 



p you wish to advertise anything anywhere at any time, 
1. write to GEO. P. HOWELL & Co., No. 10 Spruce Street, 
New York. 

pVERy one in need if information on the subject of ad- 
s'; vertisiug will do well to obtain a copy of "Book for 
Aiivertisers, " 3(i8 pages, prK-e one dollar. Mailed, postage 
.on receipt of price. Contains a careful compilation from 
gj American Newspaper Directory of all the best papers 
«(j class journals: gives the circulation rating of every one, 
Jjuagood deal of information about rates and other matters 
wumiing to the business of advertising. Address KOW- 



pnanimg to the business of advertising. Address HO 
^-L is ADVERTISING BUREAU, 10 Spruce Street, N 



'Everybody's Law Book," 

J* the title of the new 768 page work now in press, 
' J e Pared by J. Alexander Koones, L L. B., member 
CI the New York Bar. 

l„" en ables every man and woman to be their own 
«yer. it teaches what are your rights and how to 
10 i?, 1 n tllen i- When to begin a law suit and when 
evpt i one - 11 contains the useful information 
J" business man needs in every State in the Un- 
Wft 1 cont ains business forms of every variety 
biui, to the lawyer as well as to all who have legal 
In?. 688 to transact. 

'Close two dollars for a copy, or inclose two-cent 
Crlge stamp for a table of contents and terms to 
Address BEN J. W. HITCHCOCK, Pub- 
uer ,385 Sixth Avenue, New York. 




W. F. BECKER. j. P . BRCGGER. 

-~>-S-* THE 

Eastern Book Store, 

315 Market St., Harrisburg, Pa. 
BOOKS AND STATIONERY. 

Special Rates to Students. 

W Second-Hand School Books a Specialty. 

WRITE FOU PRICES. 



J 



L. SAYLOR & SOXS, 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

CARRIAGES, 

LIGHT BUGGIES. PONY PHAETONS, ETC. 
STRICTLY FIRST CLASS. 

hops Opposite Eagle Hotel, ANNVILLE, PA 

7 B. MARSHALL, M. D., 

No. 34 East Main Street, 

ANNVILLfl, PA. 



ISAAC MANN & SON, 

LARGEST CLOTHIERS, 

834 Cumberland Street, 

LEBANON, JPA. 

THE B£ST GOODS FOR THE LEAST MONEY. 



T R. McCAULY, 




DAILY MEAT 


MARKET. 


GOOD MEAT. LOW PRICES. 


ANNVILLE, FA. 


JOHN TRUMP, 




J BOOT AND SHOE 3XAJLEB, 


ANNVILLE, 


PA. 



WS. SEABOLD, 
t DEALER IN 

Drugs, Medicines, Perfumer; and Toilet Articles, 

No. 2 East Alain St., Annville, Pa. 



S. KENDIG, 

BAKERY, 

Next Door to Eagle Hotel, Annville, Pa. 



w 



J. KIEFER, M. D., 
'homeopathic physician and surgeon. 

76 West Main St., Annville, Pa. 



DEXTER LIVERY AND BOARDING STABLE 
RAILROAD ST., ANNVILLE, PA. 

R. A. MAULFAIR, - PROP'R. 

GOOD TEAMS AT REASONABLE BATES. 



82 



THE COLLEGE FORUM. 



D' 



^yiLLIAM KIEBLER, 
SHAVING AND HAIR DRESSING, 

Eagle Hotel Barber Shop, Annville, Pa. 

ADAM B. HESS, 
OFFICE AT THE HOTEL EAGLE. 
OMNIBUS TO ALL TRAINS. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

JACOB SARGENT, 

^ FASHIONABLE TAILOR, 

18 and 20 Main St., Annville, Pa. 

k RY GOODS, NOTIONS, GRO- 
CERIES, BOOTS and SHOES, 

—AND— 

GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS. 

J". S. SHOE'S, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

AC. M. HEISTER, 
• STATIONERY JOB PRINTER, 

Visiting Cards a Specialty. 

35 S. White Oak Street - - Ann v Hie, Pa. 

WILLIAM WALTZ, 
FASHIONABLE 
HAIR CUTTING AND SHAVING SALOON, 

West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 
H. H. KKEIDEK. JSC E. HERB. 

KREIDER & CO., 
DEALEKS IN ALL KINDS OF 

Hard & Soft Coal, Grain, Seeds Salt & Feed. 

Office : Railroad Street, near Depot, 
Telephone Connection. ANNVILLE, PA. 

THE BEST STOCK, THE LOWEST 
PRICES IN 

FURNITURE, jose^TTlers. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

M. 3EE. SHAUD, 

DEALER IN 

Gold Watches and Jewelry, 

Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 
FINE CANDIES AND FRUITS. 

Families and Entertainments Supplied with OYS- 
TERS and CREAM. AlttNYILLE, PA. 

S. M. SHENK S BAKERY, 

HAS ALWAYS ON HAND 

FRESH BREAD, CAKES AND ROLLS, 

One Door West Penn'a House, Annville. 



II you want to Buy a Hat right, and a riglit Hat, or anything 15 
Men's Furnishings, 

GO TO 

Successors to RAITT & Co., 

708 Cumberland Street, Lebanon, Pa, 

mimpmtm & Wkmk 

ANNVILLE, PA., 

Dealers in Dry Goods, Notions 

and Ladies' Dress Goods. 

Men's Suitings we make a Specialty. Home-made, 
Ingrain and Brussels Carpets. You buy Cheaper 
from us than away from home, and have a large 
stock to select from. 

THE 

U.B. MUTUAL AID SOCIETY 

OF PENNSYLVANIA. 

HOME OFFICE, LEBANON, PENNA. 

Chartered by the State Legislature, March 11, 1869. 
Positive amounts guaranteed and claims paid in 
full. 

Benefits of $1000 insurance secured for $S.< 0. 
Reciprocal Circle Insurance,new and very popular. 

Invested Assets $146,809.94 

Contingent Assets llfi '?fSS 

Assessment Basis 5 W*!'! 

Death Losses Paid 6,774,raffl 

THE PLAN. 

The payment of EIGHT DOLLARS on application, 
FIVE DOLLARS annually for four years, and there- 
after TWO DOLLARS annually during life, witn 
pro eata mortality assessments for each death of a 
member insured for $1000, is as follows: 



£». IB. WAGNER, 

r~*~r Headquarters t or 

GROCERIES, CONFECTIONERIES 

OYSTERS, FRUITS AND NUTS. 

Restaurant Attached. Meals at All Hours. 

12 West Main Street, Annville, Pa. 



AGE. 


Ass'T 


Age. 


ASS'MT 


Age. 


Ass'mt 


20 


65 


30 


75 


40 


90 


21 


66 


31 


77 


41 


93 


22 


67 


32 


79 


42 


94 


23 


68 


33 


81 


43 


96 


24 


69 


34 


83 


44 


98 


25 


70 


35 


85 


45 


1 01) 


26 


71 


36 


86 


46 


1 06 


27 


72 


37 


87 


47 


1 12 


28 


73 


38 


88 


48 


1 18 


29 


74 


39 


89 


49 


1 24 



130 
1 40 
1 50 
1 60 
1 70 
1 80 
1 92 



This will entitle a member to a certificate of i ~ 
to be paid after death to the legal beneficiary, « 
ever such death may occur. 



c 



Reliable Agents "Wanted Everywhere. 

HOICK BKEP, LAMB, VEAL, PORK 
TONGUES at 

Maulfair's Daily Meat Market, 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



STOLL & FUNCK, JEWELERS, 20 NORTH NINTH ST., LEBANON, PA. 



IS 



48, 

per 
ige 



869. 
ill 



iular. 



97U-00 
000.00 
,123.01 



ition, 
there- 

Uof» 



TV 

1 40 
159 
1 60 
1 70 



of II"* 
wlien- 



0» 



et, 



DON'T DO IT. 



non't suffer with aCOUGH.OOLD, SORE THROAT, 
ASTHMA, or any LUNG or THROAT trouble, 
when you can be cured by using 

DR. ROSS' COUGH BALSAM. 

It ii ever falls to core the worst cases. 

One or two doses give immediate relief. Read 
what Mr. Adam Rise, the well-known hatter, of 
Lebanon, says: 

» I have used DR. ROSS' COUGH BALSAM for 
Cough and Sore Throat, and it has done me more 
good than anything I ever used." ADAM RISE. 

PREPARED ONLY BY 

Dr. Geo. Ross & Co., 

U3FITJC3-C3HSTJS, 

Opposite Court House, LEBANON, PA. 

TRIAL SIZE, 35 CENTS. 
REG-TrXj-AulK. SIZE, $1.00. 

"seltzer brothers, 

Wholesale and Retail Sealers in 




HARDWARE, HOUSEFURNISHING GOODS. 

Manufacturers of Tin and Sheet Iron Ware ; Plumb- 
ing, Tinsmithing, Roofing. A full line of Stoves, 
Heaters, Ranges and Furnaces, Steam and Water 
Heating. 43 N. 3th St., Seltzer's Bldg., Lebanon, Pa. 

LEMBERGER'S COMPOUND TAR LOZENGES. 

Read this good endorsement by Rev. A. Lehman. 

Ebenezer, Pa., January 4, 1892. 
I have much pleasure in recommending Dr. Lem- 
oerger's Compound Tar Lozenges, having used them 
very irequently during the past two years — they 
have always relieved a tickling in the throat and 
hoarseness. I think they are invaluable for Public 
speakers and Singers. (Signed) 

A. LEHMAN, 
Pastor U. U. Church. 
Sent by Mail on Receipt of Price. 

25 Cents a Box. 5, 10 and 15 Cents Packages. 

PREPARED ONLY AT 

Jos, L, Lemberger's Drug Store, Lebanon, fa, 



1680. 



1885. 



J. ZEE. MILLER, 



1W. Comer 8th and Willow Sts, 

LEBANON, PA. 

ALL COMPANIES FIRST-CLASS. 




Wil 1 be fou nd the Largest and Best Stock of PI ANOS 
AND MUSICAL MERCHANDISE found anywhere 
in Central Pennsylvania. Prices and Terms will be 
made satisfactory. Call and See. 

MILLER ORGAN CO. 

First-Class Work. Satisfaction Guaranteed 

Moderate Prices. 

Tie New Era Printing House. 

Ovr establishment is fully equipped with 
Material and Printing Machinery with spe 
cial regard to the prompt execution, in any 
style, of all orders for books, newspaper 
work, catalogues, price-lists, and every style 
of commercial printing. Sale bills and post- 
ers a specialty. We have just added num- 
bering, perforating, eyeleting and other 
machinery, as well as a number of new type 
faces, which, together with our large variety 
of different qualities of paper, give us un- 
surpassed lacilities. Estimates furnished. 
Orders will receive prompt attention. 

REMOVED TO OUR NEW BUILDING, 

39 AND 41 N. QUEEN STREET, 

LA1TCASTEE, F-A— 

WARFE L & GEIST, - Proprietors- 

BOOTS, SHOES QD RUBBERS, 

TRUNKS AND SAT CHELS. 

The Largest Assortment, 

The Latest Styles, 

The Lowest Prices. 

You Are Invited to Give Me a Call. 

Miller's Eagle Shoe Store, 

846 Cumberland Street. 



JfLEA.SE MENTION " THE COLLEGE FORUM." 



SCHMIDT &FEINSTEIN, THE LEADING JEWELERS, 731 Cumberland St. 



■ 



Graduate Optician. 



Eyes Examined and Refracted. Fit Guaranteed or no Pay. 
Glasses as Cheap as the Cheapest. 



Lebanon Valley College, 



rHIS INSTITUTION was organized in 1866, and chartered with full col- 
legiate powers by the State Legislature in 1867. Its first class was 
graduated in 1870. Since then it has sent out nearly two hundred graduates, 
many of whom occupy positions of honor in Church and State. 

The buildings, three in number, are large and commodious, and the students' 
rooms are neatly furnished and well heated. The grounds surrounding the build- 
ings are large, beautiful and attractive, with abundant shade and excellent op- 
portunities for recreation and exercise. There are but few colleges that have 
finer locations. 

The College offers two courses of studies that lead to degrees. 
The Music Department is well equipped, maintains a graduating course and 
is under the direction of professors trained in the Boston Conservatory of MusiQ. 



PROFESSORS AND INSTRUCTORS: 



E. BENJ. BIERMAN, A. M., Ph. D., 

PRESIDENT, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

H. CLAY DEANER, A. M., 
Professor of the Latin Language. 

JOHN E. LEHMAN, A. M., 
Professor of Mathematics. 

Rev. JNO. A. McDERMAD, A. M., 
Professor of the Greek Language. 

JOHN A. SHOTT, Ph. B., 
Professor of Natural Science. 



MARY E. SLEICHTER, A. B., 
Professor of English Literature. 

CARRIE M. FLINT, 
Professor of Instrumental Music. 

ALICE K. GINGRICH, M. A., 
Professor of Harmony. 

EMMA A. DITTMAR, 
Teacher of Fine Art. 

HARVEY D. MILLER, A. B., 
Teacher of Violin. 



MEN AND WOMEN ADMITTED- 

RATES REASONABLE. 

Address the President for Information.